Small Pond

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The Jones s

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Small Pond
« on: November 09, 2010, 18:47 »
We are thinking of putting a small pond on the allotment to hopefully attract frogs and other wildlife and were looking for some advice.  It would have to be small so is there a minimum size and would it help or hinder a boggy site?
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Y.E.A.H

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2010, 19:36 »
hello,
its good to know your making a pond, as one of my favorite insects, the dragonflies is in decline   :(

All wildlife ponds should have at least one side gently sloping up and out of the water creating a ‘beach’ effect. This is essential for small animals, allowing them easy and natural access and if anything falls in it can crawl out again. Its also an ideal damp ground area where bog plants and insects will thrive. Areas of direct sunlight should be avoided, you could have problems with green water & temperature fluctuations. Semi-shade is best, but if its too shady there will be no life. Always make your pond as large as you possibly can with a minimum depth of 18 inches (this is to stop if freezing completely in the winter) and as many sloping sides as possible! A rubber pond liner would be a good material to use in construction. this can be covered with pebbles or soil around the edges to create a very convincing natural look.
i hope that helps  :)

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digalotty

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2010, 23:18 »
if it is on a site that others can access then make sure you put something round it for safety ,
children will find it a play area otherwise
when im with my 9yr old she's the sensible one

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JayG

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2010, 09:17 »
If the water table is very high you may well have problems as the pressure from below can easily lift up a flexible or fibre-glass type, or crack a concrete structure.

If a hole dug to the depth you require (and it should be at least 18") fills up even partially with water then your only real alternative is to build up the soil so the bottom of the pond will be above the water table, which could well be a lot more work than you would be prepared to undertake.

How about a bog garden?  :unsure:
Sow your seeds, plant your plants. What's the difference? A couple of weeks or more when answering possible queries!

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compostqueen

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2010, 09:36 »
I have a really small one on my plot, it's quite deep though as I wanted to attract frogs.

Trouble is, mine is not level so I'd say if you make one do level it up.   

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savbo

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2010, 12:47 »
even a washing up bowl sunk in the ground (with a stone or wood to help creatures escape) is a worthwhile pond. We've got a 24"x18" moulded pond we inherited with the plot that is home to a dozen newts (we know cos wee girl caught them all twice every weekend..). We love it so much we're putting in a 4' pond over the winter...

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digalotty

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2010, 11:03 »
we have one on our plot that is a a plant pot sunk in the ground the pot is around 18" round and has stones in to let the frogs access it ,   and they love it  :)

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Haychee

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2010, 17:22 »
I had a big piece or folded upplastic in my garden over the summer, when I finally managed to get it shifted there were 4 big frogs living in it, in the little pools of water that collected in the folds.  There wasnt much water at all, but they seemed bery happy there.  I dont even know where they came from, but wanted them to stay so have put a plastic storage tub in the bushes, filled it with water and rocks and the frogs stayed happily for many weeks after, and I hope they will reappear in spring   :)

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8doubles

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2010, 17:30 »
If you do make the pond a good depth the frogs will overwinter in it. They just lay on the bottom immobile breathing through their skin. :blink:

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N.WalesIdealist

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Re: Small Pond
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2010, 20:01 »
My grandma has an old Bristol Sink sunk into the garden, bit of plank sloping into the water lets frogs, newts and all sorts of other things crawl in and out.  Does the job.



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