Broad beans

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CHRISDONOHUE

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2020, 23:34 »
I grew Bunyard's Exhibition this spring which cropped well but would be loath to sow it in the Autumn as it is not known to be especially hardy.   Your location favours Autumn sowing and I would not want to discourage you from experimenting sowing BE this Autumn (either later this month or next month) if you have plenty of spare seed or would not be disappointed if you lose the whole crop.   Sowing Aquadulce or Aquadulce Claudia should be largely trouble free for Autumn sowing.   Sow 2" deep 6" apart in double rows 12" apart and transplant to 9" apart if too many come up.

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Blewit

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2020, 08:25 »
I grow autumn sown Aquadulce Claudia but with some wind protection as it's an exposed plot. (Aquadulce Claudia are sold as being slightly hardier than Aquadulce). I used to grow Sutton Dwarf but found they still did better behind the wind breaks so might as well have the higher yield of the taller variety.

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Dan1957

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2020, 21:54 »
I've been away so only just seen replies to the question about varieties for northern growers. Thanks to all: I haven't got a lot of space so I think I'll wait and start some off in the greenhouse in Feb.

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AnneB

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2020, 07:54 »
I've been away so only just seen replies to the question about varieties for northern growers. Thanks to all: I haven't got a lot of space so I think I'll wait and start some off in the greenhouse in Feb.
I too have had difficulties with standard broad beans in the north.   Instead, can I suggest growing "Wizard" Field beans, whether sown in the autumn, which I do, or in the spring.   I got mine from Real Seeds and also Tucker's Seeds but save my own - they do cross readily but not many people grow standard broad beans on our site, a lot of them grow field beans now.
They taste the same as broad beans, but are smaller in size.   They grow to the same height as standard broad beans but the overall yield is far higher with Wizard.   They are also less prone to chocolate spot and blackfly.  They are very hardy.
Do give them a try.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2020, 21:43 by AnneB »

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Pimento

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2020, 17:45 »
Im in the north (Yorkshire) and Ive had more success the last three years with De Monica than Ive ever had with Aquadulce, planting seeds straight into the ground as late as November. Having said that, a lot of seeds still fail and the difference in harvest time between autumn- and spring-sown crops is so small that it barely makes a difference. Not really worth it, in my opinion - I havent bothered this year.
I don't really look like my avatar.

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Pimento

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2020, 17:50 »
I agree with AnneB too, Wizard field beans are a great alternative/addition to broad beans. Ive had great yields and they taste just the same.

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bayleaf

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2020, 22:28 »
I agree about De Monica. I have grown these well in Lancashire but I will not be sowing until late February at the earliest.

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CHRISDONOHUE

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2020, 01:47 »
According to the RHS AGM list, de Monica , Masterpiece Green Longpod and The Sutton are hardy to 1C, while  Aquadulce and Aquadulce Claudia are hardy to -15C.   This may not change your mind in pursuing with de Monica if you have previously had success with it, but may influence others who might otherwise consider it winter-hardy.
The advantage of Autumn sowing in warmer climates is that the plants have much longer to develop and should produce a better crop, they tend to avoid blackfly and the earliness can be quite significant, cropping from mid May to mid June depending on the weather rather than the second week of July.

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New shoot

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2020, 08:01 »
According to the RHS AGM list, de Monica , Masterpiece Green Longpod and The Sutton are hardy to 1C, while  Aquadulce and Aquadulce Claudia are hardy to -15C.   This may not change your mind in pursuing with de Monica if you have previously had success with it, but may influence others who might otherwise consider it winter-hardy.

I think Pimento did say there were a lot of seed failures planting de Monica in autumn and the difference sowing early made was not worth it. Bayleaf also recommended waiting.  The one that was agreed on that would cope with northern winters was Wizard field beans.

I do well with those down here in the south as well and dont bother trying to overwinter standard broad beans any more.  If you start in pots under cover in February, you can catch a standard broad bean crop up down here, without the winter losses.

« Last Edit: October 20, 2020, 08:12 by New shoot »

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Pimento

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2020, 08:37 »
Thanks,  yes, I did indeed say that. As we all know, gardening is a serendipitous business with lots of local peculiarities - what works for one person wont necessarily work for another, and indeed it may not even work for the same person twice!  :D

However, lots of people do enjoy experimenting, and my own experience is that RHS recommendations are often not over-arching. any more than the instructions on the back of a seed packet apply to all conditions. If we all give honest feedback, then hopefully we  increase our shared knowledge and people can make up their own minds what theyd like to try.  :)

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New shoot

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2020, 12:34 »
Serendipitous is the word alright  :lol:

I have not grown de Monica at all, but I know at least 1 plot holder on our site overwintered Aquadulce successfully a year or so ago. Most of us have tried and failed a couple of times, then given up.

My old faithful Wizard are in the ground on the plot.  My broad bean experiment next year is to sow Karmazyn in Jan/Feb in the greenhouse to plant out. I read about these pink seeded beans in Johns diary and promptly nicked the idea, but will it work for me? Fingers crossed, but worth an experiment for sure  :)

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CHRISDONOHUE

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2020, 13:02 »
Notwithstanding Pimento's current position regarding Autumn sowing, her earlier statement that she has had more success with Autumn-sown de Monica than Aquadulce may lead the man on the Clapham omnibus to conclude that de Monica is at least equal to Aquadulce in hardiness.
I totally agree with her experiential approach, her slight scepticism of the views of august authorities and her willingness to acknowledge diversity of opinion.
Wizard beans seem indeed to be winter-hardy but they are much smaller than broad beans, most people have not yet tried them, they are more expensive to buy and are much less widely available to buy.

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AnneB

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2020, 17:05 »
Notwithstanding Pimento's current position regarding Autumn sowing, her earlier statement that she has had more success with Autumn-sown de Monica than Aquadulce may lead the man on the Clapham omnibus to conclude that de Monica is at least equal to Aquadulce in hardiness.
I totally agree with her experiential approach, her slight scepticism of the views of august authorities and her willingness to acknowledge diversity of opinion.
Wizard beans seem indeed to be winter-hardy but they are much smaller than broad beans, most people have not yet tried them, they are more expensive to buy and are much less widely available to buy.
The individual beans themselves maybe smaller but your overall yield will be many times greater than with standard broad beans and those that have tasted them can assure everyone the taste is very good indeed.  I don't think the price is much different to other types of standard broad bean seed from what I can see, although admittedly they are only available mainly from Real Seeds.  However, I got my first supply from Tucker's Seeds in Devon sold as a green manure, sadly they do not do mail order any more.   I haven't needed to order any more as I have saved seed every year for the next, so overall the cost has been extremely low.

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Pimento

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #28 on: October 20, 2020, 17:55 »
When Ive grown Wizard the beans have been maybe a bit smaller than standard broad beans, but not massively so. Theyre not dear to buy as green manure. One seller on Ebay (admittedly out of stock at the moment) has them for 1.95 for 250g. I dont think thats bad at all. Definitely worth a try.

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New shoot

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Re: Broad beans
« Reply #29 on: October 21, 2020, 09:22 »
I save seeds as well, so the cost has been minimal.  Even if you have to buy some to start, they are very hardy and just about every seed you sow grows away.   If you want to sow direct, that is quite a saving over sowing extras to allow for losses.

I agree with the comments about yield as well.  The pods may be smaller, as are the beans, but you get loads.  I like the no-faff aspect as well.  Shove in the soil and let them get on with it. I find they dont need supporting canes and strings and do shrug off aphid attack and chocolate spot to a large extent, much more so than normal broad beans  :)

I experiment with a few new crops every year, discard some and keep others. These are keepers. I find I can make my own mind up over such things, without worrying too much about what anyone else thinks  :lol:



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