Poly-tunnels, land use, planning permission, and a couple more questions

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John

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You'll find the language thing does come, I can usually read a signpost now without a second thought. Main thing is that f is v unless ff which is f. Think of and off (ov and off) Double ll is usually a throaty ch sound. Y and W seem to be vowels :)

Basic tools: Spade, fork, hand trowel, hoe. I love a Dutch hoe but swivel heads are good and many people swear by them. The tool you're thinking of is a mattock I think.

Rotovator - my 1976 Merry Tiller is the equal of any machine upto 500 and better than many of them. However, if you're going to be cultivating more than 1/2 acre, I'd take a look at 2 wheel tractors which can have various attachments like a rotovator

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ConfusedGardener

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It's not an asada, but I think I've found it - a "mattoc": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattock


Anyway, it looks like I've messed up. I was under the impression that there is another stage after "completion" which would be when we are given the keys to the property, but it is actually at completion.

We still have yet to start packing, and the move is in 4 or 5 days, so I probably won't have time to post on here till we have moved in.

Thanks again to all who have offered advice, and I'll see you on the other side!

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John

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Good Luck!!!  :D

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Fen

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When you have decided where you are going to have the polytunnel and preferably while things are a bit green I'd give the ground a good dose of Roundup. If you don't and once the tunnel is up you'll have a job to kill the grass and any perrenial weeds. If you get a rotovator consider rotavating the ground before you put the tunnel up. Much easier and almost impossible and dangerous 'Carb Mon.) when tunnel is up.

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snowdrops

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Finally, when dealing with Welsh farmers, keep in mind that they've bargaining skills that would make a hedge fund manager blush. After shaking hands with them, count your fingers!

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John

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If they sent Dafydd the farmer into the EU instead of Cameron things would change. The French and German premiers would be sitting there saying 'but why did we agree this? I'm sure we didn't mean that!'


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ConfusedGardener

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Hello all,

Thanks for the tips Fen.

We are now in our new home and I have finally got access to the internet again. There has been so much to do since we moved in about a week ago that we have not had time to do anything significant outdoors yet, although I did make sure to spend some time gathering fallen branches for kindling! As it's been raining so much I think the ground is too wet to work anyway. I think we will now have to wait till it gets warmer/drier.

We have met some of our neighbors, but only spoken to one regarding poly-tunnels. He seemed fine about them, and even the wind turbines that we mentioned we were thinking of putting in.

It looks like we will need to level out the ground where the poly-tunnels are to be sited, but I don't think it will need to be drained. It seems to be one of the best drained parts of our land. Apart from sourcing some compost so that we can dig it in in spring, clearing some of the trees/scrub, and measuring out the site, I'm not sure what else we can do in the mean time?

I'll also have to speak to our other neighbors as well as the local planning authority, and order the hardware if there are no objections.

The other thing I need to do is find a good chainsaw. I don't suppose anyone has any tips on what to look out for or could recommend a brand/saw?

I'm not 100% sure, but there are a couple of large jerry cans sitting outside near the car-port of what cold be diesel which the previous owners left behind. It would be nice to be able to use them if I could find out for sure what it is in those cans!


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arugula

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The other thing I need to do is find a good chainsaw. I don't suppose anyone has any tips on what to look out for or could recommend a brand/saw?

I'm not 100% sure, but there are a couple of large jerry cans sitting outside near the car-port of what cold be diesel which the previous owners left behind. It would be nice to be able to use them if I could find out for sure what it is in those cans!



Glad you have your move completed, nine years ago and it still fills me with horrors. :)
 
Chainsaw-wise, you'd never go far wrong with a Stihl. They make saws in quite a range of sizes designed for differing applications. They are dear, but they do last. If you can find a local-ish supplier, you can go and talk to them and see the machines. You need training and safety equipment too.

Regarding the fuel, you'll need to test that to find out if it is diesel or petrol or something else, but petrol should smell quite strong. You won't want to use the fuel if water has got into it.
"They say a snow year's a good year" -- Rutherford.

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John

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Couple of points for you -

Chainsaws - do get the protective gear. It's not cheap, you look a total wally dressed in it but it's a lot easier than hospital. If you're planning on tree surgery, it's worth getting on a course on how to use them. I only use my electric chainsaw for cutting up logs so haven't bothered with a course.

Old fuel goes off - according to some of the oil companies petrol stored in a tin might only last for 30 days! (Honest) Don't know about diesel but I do know getting the tank flushed etc is very costly. You're probably best off to dump the fuel. Don't pour it into a drain, the council should have a facility.

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ConfusedGardener

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Glad you have your move completed, nine years ago and it still fills me with horrors. :)

It's certainly not an experience I'd like to repeat. We hired a 7.5 tonne van for 4 days and moved all our stuff ourselves. It was backbreaking work to load/unload (it was literally packed to the rafters almost all the way to the back) and there were times when I wasn't sure we'd make it.

One of our neighbors had to pull us out with a tractor after I made the mistake of getting stuck in the mud at the side of the house where we had to unload, but somehow we managed not to break anything and get back in time, albeit the renal company had to stay open a little bit later than usual.


Thanks for the tips regarding chainsaws arugula and John.

There are a few medium sized trees (20-30 cm) as well as some scrub that I will have to clear so I guess that I'll have to get some training.

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John

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If you've only a little work to do, then it could be more economical to get someone in. However, if you have training then you can be the chap they call in and pay :)

When we moved here the removal firm got a 40' truck up the track and unloaded via the side gate. Since then we've had delivery men in transit vans deny it's possible to get up the track or the drive. Country delivery men come in 2 types. The first knock on your door, open it and start unloading into the house. Often the second thing they say after hello is two sugars, please.
The second sort ring you to say they can't find you, ring again from within sight of the house to say they're lost and then deny it's possible to get any sort of vehicle within 100 yards. They never say '2 sugars, please' for some reason :)

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ConfusedGardener

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Well there are quite a few mature trees on our property, and some will need trimming or felling as they are shading the area where I'd like to site the poly-tunnels, so I think it will make sense to do it myself. It would be a bonus if I could be paid for doing other people's trees too.

I have to admit that I wasn't sure if it'd be possible to get our van down drive. It can't have been far off 40'.

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joyfull

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I agree with Arugula Stihl chainsaws are the best. I used these when I did my chainsaw licence training (only got a couple of sections as I don't climb trees and the thought of dangling on a rope with a chainsaw in my hands fills me with horror).
For what you are hoping to do then make sure you do the maintenance section and the cross cut. If they are pine/fir trees then you will have to do another section which will cover snedding (removing the branches first before felling) as firs are very springy.
I still do though prefer to fell a tree the old fashioned way by using a bow saw - slower but very satisfying to do  :D
Staffies are softer than you think.

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ConfusedGardener

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I had a look, and the Stihl range does seem to be very comprehensive. I'm not sure which to go for though - I suppose the one that can cope with the largest trees we'd want to fell (there are a few with 40-60 cm trunks), but I guess I'll have to talk to a dealer. I don't really want to spend more than 4-500 on the saw alone if I can avoid it - ideally no more than 350, but I'm not sure that will buy me the saw that's suitable for my needs. Then there's the safety gear and course on top of that.

 Quite a few of our trees are firs so I guess I will have to do some snedding training.



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