Wood burner

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Sparkyrog

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2013, 20:13 »
any soft wood will do to get it going ,but imho the best allround wood to burn is beech
I cook therefore I grow

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Griffete

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2013, 21:34 »
Thanks sparkyrog

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2013, 21:51 »
Our friend Harry in the village says ash is best!  We just burn anything we can get our hands on.

My old dining chairs went one year!   :lol:

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Sparkyrog

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2013, 21:55 »
Depends on what you want Grannie ! oak is the king of woods burning slow and hot ,Ash burns hot and fast Beech is somewhere in the middle  :D

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2013, 21:59 »
How do you feel about silver birch?  :)

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Sparkyrog

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2013, 22:02 »
one of the few I have never burnt or not knowingly  :) I was in the trade for a while so have burnt most types of wood in mine ,both native and otherwise .

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2013, 22:20 »
We buy our logs from the son of a tree surgeon, so we never know what we are getting, but there is a lot of ash at the moment, and silver birch. 

There is something else that when as dry as we get them is VERY light, not sure what it is, but it's almost as light as balsa wood!  This wood is barn dried for a year before we get it.

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compostqueen

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2013, 23:35 »
Woods have different qualities and some burn better than others. There is a rhyme on Google which explains all  :D

We have trees at home which get cut down and chopped up but if we do order a load I get mix of hard and soft wood logs.

The felled wood has to be allowed to dry out, it gets quartered and stacked and left to season.  If you bang the logs together they ring if they're dry enough. If you get a dull thud they need more seasoning (under cover in a log store)

Pallet wood burns extremely hot so you have to be careful.  I would use it just as kindling to get the logs going.  Treat yourself to a temperature gauge which fits onto the flue pipe with a magnet. This shows when the log burner is at the right temperature and alerts you if it's getting overheated.  I don't burn wood with paints or tars on it

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2013, 23:50 »
temperature gauge eh?   Mmm thanks will look at them.  We have an eco fan on top of our burner that helps distribute the heat quicker.  It does help heat the lounge quicker.

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Trillium

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2013, 15:08 »
Any of the properly dried hardwoods like oak, acer, elma, ironwood, etc.

Any wood will burn but you really want to avoid burning any quantities at a time of softwoods like evergreens, willow, etc because the creosote buildup is fast and heavy and dangerous. They're just good for starting up the daily fire or kicking wet hardwood into action.

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Starbee

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2013, 10:27 »
I see no reason whatsoever why you cannot burn dry wood pallets in a wood burner; indeed they make an excellent and cheap fuel source if you have access to them. Contrary to what others have said on here very few, if any, pallets are made from treated wood. Some have plastic parts, but these are obvious. The nails in them will need to be cleaned out of the ash.

So long as the wood you burn is properly seasoned and dried, is not treated and comes from a sustainable source then it is good wood to burn in a wood burner.

You can buy "logs" made from saw mill waste, these may seem expensive but per BTU/Kw they are actually very good value.

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The Silver Surfer

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2013, 18:19 »
I agree 100% with Trillium's post on page 1.  I'd add to that that have too-cool a fire will also create creosote.  Pallets are fine, but mix it up with other woods and don't use the painted or green stained ones.  We're lucky enough to have Almond and Olive wood on tap here, as well as Pine and other soft woods.  Normally I only use the softwood as kindling, then add the hard wood once you've got a blaze on.

Get a stove pipe thermometer too as it will tell you if the fire is hot enough, thus minimising creosote deposits.

Also worth an extra investment is something like the Caframo stove top fan. It works by metallic reaction which drives a motor and fan blades, thus circulating the warm air from around the stove.  We bought one a few months ago and it really does make a difference in warming those cold zones in a room.

Here's our stove (bought from fleabay), there's 2 cooking holes too, that's my rabbit casserole in there!


 

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2013, 21:11 »
We bought an Eco fan a few weeks back, and it really does make a difference in how quickly the lounge warms up!

But if anyone decides they want one.  Shop around.  they vary in price fom 58 to 120 for the identical fan!  :ohmy:
« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 21:20 by GrannieAnnie »

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3 allotments

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2013, 21:23 »
hello ive had quite a few agas/woodburners i find burning dry seasoned  ash wood will burn quick  giving lots of fast heat but burning seasoned oak will give you hot but longer burning , it will stay in all night.all that lovely wood ash for the garden.burning wet wood just cloggs the chimney up with tar with less heat,hope this helps. from 2 allotments ;)
diggity dig dig

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bravemurphy

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Re: Wood burner
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2013, 21:47 »
My father has just had a new property built and a chimney with the correct flue liners for a multi fuel wood burner.

there is alot of tar well thats what i think it is running out of the top of the chimney and also coming down the liners, it almost seems like as if the inside of the liners are condensating.

He has told me he has burned unseasoned timber on it and thought this is what it must be.

Its got that bad he has had another metal liner installed inside the other liner.

has anyone else come across this or does anyone know what this could be please?



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