show onions

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seedman

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show onions
« on: November 30, 2011, 08:02 »
Hi all has any one started there onions off yet just read an article in the gardening news about starting onions off in Oct/Nov it was talking about show onions i know they are normally started at Thewordwemustnotsay time just wondering if anyone has tried Oct/Nov Thanks
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yorky

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Re: show onions
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2011, 20:33 »
I think its only worth starting so early if you are aiming for a show in late June or July. You would also have to provide them with enough heat and light to keep them steadily growing through the winter. That would mean proper growlights for at least 12 hours per day untill about March.

My local show isnt untill September, so I will be starting at the traditional time at Thewordwemustnotsay.
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seedman

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Re: show onions
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2011, 20:41 »
Thanks Yorky, seems to much bother lights and heat  yes are show is not till September, it was something i seen in the paper garden news to much reading  :)
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 06:43 by seedman »

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Carrot Man

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Re: show onions
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2011, 19:28 »
If you are competing at National level, then you will need to start now and use grow lights and heating
If you are not competing at this level, then the expense of electric will not justify the competition at the lower levels and you should be able to get an onion up to 3lb which should be able to compete, without using heating and lights and sown later

« Last Edit: December 04, 2011, 19:55 by John »

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AlaninCarlisle

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Re: show onions
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2011, 19:52 »
I've never grown onion from seed before but would like to try and hopefully grow 3lb samples.

What variety do you recommend? I'm assuming you just start them off in trays in a heated propagator and then progress them through individual pots into the open ground?

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Carrot Man

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Re: show onions
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2011, 22:05 »
If you are going to go for an exhibition type onion, you have to go for a Kelsae Onion
I grow all onions from seed now as you get a stronger onion

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John

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Re: show onions
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 00:01 »
There's a series of articles on growing onions for show on the site by John Trim you might like to check out.

Growing Large Onions Guide
Check out our books - ideal presents

John and Val Harrison's Books
 

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Carrot Man

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Re: show onions
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2011, 18:21 »
I also recommend it
Also the long carrot one is pretty good also  :blink:

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sunshineband

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Re: show onions
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 19:52 »
I don't have any lights to use.

If I sow the seeds early in January, in  a propagator, will the little plants survive alright in a greenhouse that stays at about 10 deg C?
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Carrot Man

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Re: show onions
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2011, 22:10 »
It will be difficult without heat but it depends on the weather
What about a paraffin or gas bottle heater?
At least you know the price before hand rather than get an expensive surprising electric bill
Or, how about keeping them in the house in a spare room or conservatory?

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sunshineband

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Re: show onions
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2011, 22:13 »
It will be difficult without heat but it depends on the weather
What about a paraffin or gas bottle heater?
At least you know the price before hand rather than get an expensive surprising electric bill
Or, how about keeping them in the house in a spare room or conservatory?


Not really enough light in the house I'm sorry to say, even with a tinfoil reflector  :(

I was hoping that 10 deg would be OK, but maybe I'll have to think again. Not keen on paraffin -- had some bad experiences  :tongue2:

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John

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Re: show onions
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2011, 00:17 »
I think you have to accept that growing show vegetables often involves spending money on equipment and energy. It's really a different ball game to table growing.

By the time you get up to NVS branch and national championship level it's like the Olympics. Almost a full time job in itself - which is why, I suspect the retired feature strongly.

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sunshineband

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Re: show onions
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2011, 07:18 »
I was just wanting some big onions this year coming, so I will wait until a bit later to plant the seeds perhaps  :unsure:

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Carrot Man

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Re: show onions
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2011, 18:02 »
As John says, often there is money involved in growing for showing
Onions are probably the most costly Vegetable to grow due to the heat and lighting
When I started, I was going down the onion route until I had it pointed out to me that unless I could afford the set up and running costs to compete with the best, then it wasn't worth doing it half hearted, as it would still be expensive but would not get the rewards

This is why I went towards Carrots. Any set up for specialised vegetables will cost you to start but there is plenty of vegetables which don't need a lot of cost to set set up, such as Runner Beans, Cabage, Cauliflowers, Shallots, Cucumbers, Tomatoes and the list goes on

I grow my roots, celery, peas at home (peas as I have moth on my allotment)
And, cabbage, cauli, potatoes, cucumbers, shallots on my allotment

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yorky

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Re: show onions
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2011, 20:17 »
If you arent competing in a show and just want some big onions for the kitchen then 10 deg should be okay. As long as you keep them steadily growing so that you have good sized plants to put out in April they should get to about 3lbs. I grew them for years like that.

In more recent times I have invested in a grow light, and as far as I am concerned it is money well spent. To put it in perspective, as a birthday treat a neighbour took his young son and a friend to watch Leeds United. He said that he didnt get much change from 100. Thats just for 90 minuets of football. I doubt if my greenhouse power bills come to that all winter.



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