Outdoor tomatoes

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Totty

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Outdoor tomatoes
« on: February 12, 2011, 20:56 »
I have a really nice mixture of new F1s and heritage tomato seed for this year. Around six-8 will be greenhouse grown and another 10 grown on the plot.
 Is blight the ,main reason for more people not growing toms outside?
 I grew a couple of Gardeners delight last year in some spare room and thbey were fine, but have dedicated them their own bed this year.
 I saw in a recent mag a guy who covered his toms individually with dry cleaner bags, plastic ones, to keep blight off.
Any suggestions on what i can do to make things go smoothly?

Totty

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solway cropper

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2011, 21:19 »
I only grow tumbler type toms outside as they give a nice early crop and can be nearly done by the time blight strikes up here. The main tomato crop goes in the greenhouse which gives some protection against blight although, for the last four years we've not had much trouble with it.

I think if you live in a blight-prone area it is probably not a good idea to put too many toms outside unless you are going to spray at the first sign of it and I prefer to garden without chemicals if I can.

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shokkyy

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2011, 01:35 »
I never grow tomatoes anywhere else but outside, in baskets, pots and in a bed. I've only once ever had a problem with blight, and I'm pretty sure that came in on a plant I bought from a garden centre.

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DD.

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2011, 07:04 »
Not sure whether you grow on a plot or at home, shokkyy, but you're more liable to get blight on a plot where there's lots of other toms & spuds that can play host to it.

Two years ago was a bad year for blight in our area, I took the precautions I recommend in this thread in the FAQ's forum.

http://chat.allotment-garden.org/index.php?topic=56717.msg668473

Out of the 40 or so plot holders on out site, I was the only one not to have blight.

One regular said it was too expensive to spray, (as he tipped his plants into the skip),well 1/4 of a sachet per time out of a box of 10 of the product that costs 8.99 or there abouts, is not expensive in my book, (22.5p a time)when it's protecting 50 tomato plants.

Whether you spray or not is up to you. You pays your money and all that.
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shokkyy

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2011, 09:20 »
Not sure whether you grow on a plot or at home, shokkyy, but you're more liable to get blight on a plot where there's lots of other toms & spuds that can play host to it.


I grow at home, and I suspect that's why I've always done so well with blight. My house is on a country lane with very few houses nearby and I'm a couple of miles away from the nearest small town with allotments. I'm not sure I'd grow tomatoes if I had to battle blight every year, because I really don't like to use sprays or chemicals.

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JayG

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2011, 09:21 »
Yes, for blight to strike two things have to happen; there have to be airborne blight spores carried to your plants (more likely if there are a lot of potatoes and tomatoes being grown in your area), and then there also has to be a sustained period of high humidity for the spores to germinate on your plants (the Smith period.)

There's not a lot you can do about either of those but if you don't want to go down the spraying route you can try and tip the odds slightly in your favour by making sure you don't unintentionally create a microclimate which favours spore germination.

Don't crowd your plants, and avoid wetting the leaves when watering. I have usually just about got mine through the season in an open-topped cold frame by removing leaves which are touching each other or the sides of the frame (which traps water.) I also managed to save a plant which developed blight by removing the affected stem before it spread to the rest of the plant, but you have to be vigilant and quick (and wash your hands and the knife afterwards!)
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MoreWhisky

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2011, 11:09 »
I had blight in 2009 still got plenty of them before it struck tho.

 Last yr used Dithane and didnt get any blight. Is it right thats be taken of the market now? Glad i bought a box for this yr.

Hopefully will hear if the new stuff is any good for next yr.
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DD.

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011, 12:58 »
It's been replaced by the originally named "Bayer Fruit & Vegetable Disease Control". I've still got a stash of Dithane as well!

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strangerachael

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 13:05 »
There is a lot of work going on to develop blight resistant varieties at the moment. Last year I did Ferline F1 and Legend which both claimed to be blight resistant. I did get a tiny bit of blight but the fruits weren't really affected. There are quite a few other blight resistant varieties  around as well. Might be worth having a go with them?
Rachael

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DD.

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2011, 13:09 »
It's 4 or 5 years back now, but blight managed to totally wipe out my Ferline.

They're blight resistant,  not blight proof.

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Totty

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2011, 20:50 »
Ferline is one variety, along with gardeners delight, tumbling tom, tigerella, and a couple of others, we like to grow as organicaly as possible, but we also like tomatoes, therefore if i need a spray which will save a large amount of a favourite crop i will. There are suprisingly few people on site who grow toms and only a couple grow spuds as we are a very small community site (15 plots) with small plots and they take up lots of room. The site is surrounded by fields although im not sure if that bears any relevence to blight or not. Any further advice is much appreciated.

Totty

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MoreWhisky

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2011, 21:44 »
I try to be as organic as possible, but with outside toms its a must to spray if i want a decent crop im afraid. And I have tried a year without blight spray something i wont be trying again.

Oh and yes i do also use the more blight resistant varietys.

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Carollan

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 19:09 »
Does growing tomatoes organically mean you feed them with something you made yourself?or do you use the tomato feed in the bright red plastic bottles ?I haven`t got a bottle to hand so I don`t know what the magic ingredients are :)

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MoreWhisky

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2011, 19:15 »
I use my home made and grown comfrey tea  ;)

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prakash_mib

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Re: Outdoor tomatoes
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2011, 19:20 »
blight is always a problem with Toms as they mature late and run into potato harvest.
Last year we didnt had problem with blight (thats once in three years for me) mainly due to wet/very wet august. but we had to live with lots of green tomatoes at the end of the produce.
I dont want to use chemicals and am not taking toms to the plot. they will grow in garden and if they get blighted... well let them *** off  :)

on the feeds comfrey/nettle teas are good and last year I had considerable success with nettle teas (beware of the smell)
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