Wild horse

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chloe

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Wild horse
« on: September 02, 2010, 15:33 »
I brought a wild foal (colt) off the New Forest and i have had him for three years, he is now 5 and still currently on the New Forest. But i would love to bring him in and ride him.. But he has only ever had a headcolar on. Would i still be able to break him in?

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tosca100

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2010, 16:24 »
You might, depending on a lot of factors.
Do you have the facilities to keep him? As an Entire, used to living on the forest, it would need to be very secure.
Do you have the experience(honestly) and the help of another experienced person. Maybe not if you are asking on a non equine site.
Do you want to keep him entire? At his age that will take an awful lot of work.
Do you have the time to put the work in, and are you confident around nervous animals?
Do you have plenty of pennies to pay for vets/professional help if needed?

Only you know the answers, and you need to be honest with yourself. It can be done, but it would take time and patience and experience. If you really want to ride him, the first thing you need to do is get him gelded.

Good luck, let us know what you decide. :)

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chloe

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2010, 17:03 »
He is already gelded, and i have a place to keep him and i have my own money to give him and i would give him all the care in the world. I am confident round him as i have known him since he was 2 months old  :blush: and he follows me everywhere! lol, But im just worried out friendship would be ruined if i broke him in?

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tosca100

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2010, 17:16 »
Excellent...go for it then. Your relationship will be greatly enhanced by the time he is backed, there is nothing like the thrill of sitting on your own trained horse for the first time. I still remember the feeling when I first sat on my mare after "playing" with her for six months....and that was 30 years ago. We had a very special relationship till she died at 28, but that doesn't mean she wasn't a real nightmare at times....comes with the territory.

Get me, I'm all excited at the thought of someone else doing what I can't do any more. :lol:

Wish you all the luck in the world, it will be worth the traumas that will come! :D

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chloe

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2010, 17:48 »
Thank you, the only thing is...
he is 5 years old, and he has never had a anything on him apart from a numnah once and a headcolar... he doesn't know how to move on the headcolar so will this effect being broken in?

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tosca100

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2010, 20:04 »
If he will follow you, you can start to put words to actions, so if you are standing still and walk forward, just say "walk on" as he moves and praise, and if he will stop, say "whoa". Do this every time he walks/stops, then the next step, when he knows that, is to give a short tug on the lead rope and say the same. Don't pull though, he's stronger than you! Time and patience. :)

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wighty

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2010, 20:44 »
Tosca is giving you the same advice I would.  It is going to take a lot longer than it would have taken if started a few years ago. It takes a lot of patience to back a pony and you should never really do it on your own.  I had my Dad's help.

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chloe

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2010, 09:56 »
Okay thank you  :)

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Foghorn-Leghorn

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2010, 10:02 »
Do you know anyone local who has had experience of breaking horses?  They could then offer guidance and even that other pair of hands which are essential when doing something like this.

All I would say is take baby steps with him, be very, very patient and praise every step in the right direction - no matter how small.  Acknowledge when you both have had enough for the day and leave things on a high note.  We all have bad days and animals are no exception; it's days like this when you have to leave the training alone and possibly just enjoy some bonding time over an apple and a bit of a neck scratch!

Has he ever had experience of being in a stable and/or relatively confined space that a yard entails?  He may just need a few weeks of settling in to his new environment before moving on to the backing and breaking stage.

Good luck with your endeavour and I'd love to see some pictures of him.  :)
"The chicken came firstóGod would look silly sitting on an egg."

ó Author Unknown

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chloe

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2010, 12:54 »
He's naver been in a stable, but i put him in a field on the forest which took him a few days to adjust to but he loves going in there now as there is more grass! But i'm worried about taking him away from his mum. They have been together for 5 years and i would hate to separte them as the mum isn't mine.. :(

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Foghorn-Leghorn

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2010, 13:05 »
Horses do adjust to leaving their established herd and coming into new ones - it can just take a bit of time for them to settle.  I presume he won't be alone where you plan to keep him as horses are gregarious animals by nature.  If you could keep him with an older, sensible horse they could actually help "show him the ropes" and he'll come to realise that being led in from the field, stabled and being handled is all part of normal life.  Like I said before, all changes take time to adjust and you shouldn't rush them through each change.

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chloe

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2010, 13:53 »
Yes he would have company there :) thank you :D

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penninehillbilly

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2010, 00:01 »
How exciting, I feel quite envious, a whole new life beginning for both of you, looking forward to hear how you go on.

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Wild Pony

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Re: Wild horse
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2010, 13:53 »
I'm envious too, its been 17 years since I backed my fella. Lots of patience and remember to breathe!! Sounds silly, but you hold your breath you transfer mixed messages to him.
Good luck and never be too proud to shout help.



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