Disposal

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SnooziSuzi

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Disposal
« Reply #30 on: September 25, 2008, 23:04 »
Henny Penny is currently in a 2' deep hole in a quiet part of my allotment where no crops would ever be grown.   I thought I was doing the right thing  :roll:

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poultrygeist

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« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2008, 23:07 »
I've buried plenty of pets over the years in our back garden (different one).

Don't see a problem unless she had a transmittable disease.

Rob 8)

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Bodger

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Disposal
« Reply #32 on: September 26, 2008, 07:03 »
Our council refuse department answered the question of the disposal of dead wild animals and they said that they were happy to accept such offerings in their bins. It seems to me that they might draw a line if it came to a full sized stag of course. :D

Wild animals, for obvious reasons don't come under the Animal By Product Regulations.

Don't forget the trouble that Fred West and his Mrs got themselves into. :shock:  :shock:  :shock:

Seriously though, small scale poultry keepers like ourselves are probably being perfectly sensible in our approach to the disposal of dead poultry, but as we all know, common sense, doesn't wash when it comes to dealing with officialdom. Consequently, we must all have the correct answers at the ready, should we ever be called upon to give them.

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Aunt Sally

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« Reply #33 on: September 26, 2008, 08:02 »
A little off topic but just an interesting theoretical thought.

I buy a chicken from tesco or the local free range farm and put it in my fridge.  Now for many reasons said dead chicken does not get cooked and a week or so later I chuck it in the bin.   How is this different to putting a dead pet hen in the bin  :?:
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Bodger

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« Reply #34 on: September 26, 2008, 08:05 »
I checked this as well, and its food, so you are OK.

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Aunt Sally

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« Reply #35 on: September 26, 2008, 08:13 »
Quote from: "Bodger"
I checked this as well, and its food, so you are OK.


 :?  But my dead hen could be food.  I just choose not to eat it  :wink:

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Bodger

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« Reply #36 on: September 26, 2008, 08:23 »
I'm not defending the law, I'm simply trying to point out what it is.
These laws are designed in the main, to apply to farmers who may have large numbers of dead bodies to dispose of but they are still applicable to poultry keepers.

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Aunt Sally

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« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2008, 08:27 »
Yes, I understand that Bodger. Crazy old world eh   :!:  

No one can be trusted us use any common sense nowadays  :wink:

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poultrygeist

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« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2008, 09:25 »
Fortunately, they must be kept quite busy and would have to be VERY bored to bother with the likes of us.  :)

Unless they suspected 'fowl' play of course  :lol:

 :oops: sorry

Rob 8)

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GrannieAnnie

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« Reply #39 on: September 26, 2008, 09:55 »
What gets me is, we have all these rules and regs going on.  then these TV programmes encourage to keep chickens so we can eat lovely fresh eggs, but no one comes along and says well, now you've got your hens, did you know that when it dies, you can't bury it as it isn't strictly a pet, and you can't put it in the bin as it could carry an awful diease and infect our lovely clean land fill site, but you can pay a man lots of money to come and take it away for you!!!!!    :x  :x

Also, when we clean out the chook sheds, most of the manure goes onto the compost heaps, but the other week, there was a lot of straw and shavings that was still very dry, so we decided to take it to landfill.  We wanted to put it in the green bins, as it would help their compst a lot and the council composting is very hot and will turn it into manure very quickly.

What have you got in those bags said the man at the gate.  straw and shavings from our chickens Brian said, can't go in the green waste, we aren't allowed animal by-products.  So we took it round to landfill.  What have you got in there??  another man said.  Brian told him the same thing.  Can't go in landfill, we are not licensed for animal by-products.  

Brian said what do I do with it then?  Our compost bins are full.  Oh you can bring in a carrier bag full a week, and you can't put it in your own rubbish bin as they are not allowed to take it either.  You have to make your own arrangements to dispose of it!!!

So we do, we have a lovely big fire each week, which with the shavings takes nearly a week to smoulder through, lovely and hot and whoops I dropped that dead chicken on the fire by mistake!!!!

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poultrygeist

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« Reply #40 on: September 26, 2008, 12:18 »
Quote from: "GrannieAnnie"

So we do, we have a lovely big fire each week, which with the shavings takes nearly a week to smoulder through, lovely and hot and whoops I dropped that dead chicken on the fire by mistake!!!!


If they ask, tell them it's a Bar-b-que !!  :D

Rob 8)

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woodburner

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« Reply #41 on: September 28, 2008, 10:21 »
I've put raw bones from supermarket chickens in my bokashi bin and they've disapeared quite nicely.
I was planning on doing the same with the guts and feathers as well from my own birds, when the time comes.
Hopefully I won't get too many birds up and die without my realising they are ailing, If I miss the odd one, I'd want to give it a pm, so it would end up being dismembered as well anyway so I figure it could go in the Bokashi bin too.
I hadn't thought much about what to do with the carcasses if a fox gox gets in, but having read this thread I think I'd have a nice hot bonfire; I wouldn't want to risk the fox digging up the bodies.
The only circumstance I can think of that I would call DEFRA is if a lot of birds die in one day or in quick succession hours after showing symptoms. i.e. in case it might be bird flu, so need a professional post mortem.
I demand the right to buy seed of varieties that are not "distinct, uniform and stable".

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ceri green

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« Reply #42 on: September 28, 2008, 21:15 »
whats a bokashi bin??????

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MontyTom

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« Reply #43 on: September 28, 2008, 21:48 »
Double bag and bin. Bury them and mr fox will come sniffing. Or give to very hungry ferrets.



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