Apple tree from a pip

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vikingraider

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Apple tree from a pip
« on: May 18, 2023, 19:33 »
Around about 10 years ago my wife decided to plant a pip from an apple she'd eaten. We grew it on and planted it out and it's now 8-10ft tall. However in all that time it's only ever had one flower on it(which quickly dropped off). I know planting a pip like that is a risk to what apples you might get but will we ever get apples on it?

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Aunt Sally

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2023, 11:01 »
Around about 10 years ago my wife decided to plant a pip from an apple she'd eaten. We grew it on and planted it out and it's now 8-10ft tall. However in all that time it's only ever had one flower on it(which quickly dropped off). I know planting a pip like that is a risk to what apples you might get but will we ever get apples on it?

You probably won’t ever get much of a crop  :(

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steven c

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2023, 15:36 »
i think most fruit trees are grafted onto a different rootstock so the pip may grow different to your apple tree being now on standard rootstock??.   well done though.
from bow like to grow

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wighty

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2023, 17:00 »
I tried (long, long ago when I was a teenager(!) to plant a plum ,peach and lemon stone,pip) . They did germinate but never came to anything and I can't remember what happened to them.  They probably went to that great orchard in the sky!

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vikingraider

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2023, 19:29 »
Thanks for the replies. I thought it wouldnt produce the same as the variety it came from, but just expected some fruit, not it never to have apples on it.

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Nobbie

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2023, 20:27 »
I think one of the reasons to grow on rootstocks is to bring them into production earlier, so you may just have to wait longer and the tree may end up quite large. The original Bramley apple was grown from a pip and must have fruited OK without being on a rootstock. Seem to remember it was quite a large tree though.

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New shoot

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2023, 07:45 »
I think one of the reasons to grow on rootstocks is to bring them into production earlier, so you may just have to wait longer

That is true.  Root stocks do control the vigour and eventual height of fruit trees, but grafting also bring plants to maturity earlier.  Wisterias are normally sold as grafted plants to ensure they flower quickly and people are not waiting for years. 

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cc

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2023, 13:43 »
It should produce, although another tree near it will help.
It's now classed as feral Apple tree.
They normally produce apples which are large hard and tasteless.
But not always as granny smith and Blenheim orange are feral trees.
So you never know you may have .... You get to name it!
Yuch for instance!
There is ferel one near me with not a totally horrible taste but not worth the effort.
 Close to it is a feral pear tree.
Massive crop of massive flavourless pears. And they are rock hard and go from rock hard to rotten without the soft edible bit in-between. Definitely not worth picking.

To produce a none feral IE the same as the original they have to take a cutting from above the graft and graft to a rootstock. This is the only way of having the same apples.
Feral is more or less what you get when you use the seed from a f1 hybrid.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2023, 14:49 by cc »

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vikingraider

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2023, 18:17 »
There's a long established bramley apple tree about 15 metres away

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Subversive_plot

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2023, 19:39 »
I will always remember the huge old apple tree that grew behind my parent's property in Indiana, on the southern hedgerow bordering a field usually planted to soybeans and occasionally corn.  The tree was clearly feral, as you say, and huge, the forked trunk was at least a foot and a half across.  The apples were small, but edible when properly ripe. It never seemed to have been part of an orchard, so it likely came from a random pip.

As children, that tree was the focal point for a lot of our neighborhood childhood play.  We climbed it, made forts under it's shade, ate the apples (green or ripe), used the rotten, vinegary apples as ammunition in pretend war games. Every neighborhood child knew that tree, and if you said "meet me at the apple tree after lunch", they knew exactly where that was!  My mother would even humor us and make an apple pie from the apples (when ripe of course). When we were a little older, that came with "...if you help peel, core, and cut them up".  Most of the apples were no more than a couple inches across, ripened yellowish, with the occasional red streak.

I was sad when the old tree died, long after my childhood.  I still have a short cylinder of wood cut from one of the dead branches, I use it as a paperweight sometimes, but mostly it is just something to remember the tree by.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2023, 19:45 by Subversive_plot »
"Somewhere between right and wrong, there is a garden. I will meet you there."~ Rumi

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Yorkie

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2023, 22:14 »
What lovely memories  :D
I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days all attack me at once...

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Subversive_plot

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2023, 23:18 »
What lovely memories  :D

It's something I think children of the latest few generations have missed out on. Makes me sad for them.

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Anguswylie

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Re: Apple tree from a pip
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2023, 12:48 »
Hi,

I did the same a few years ago. I got a nice tree though never any blossom. I was later told by a friend that has an orchard, that it likely wont blossom because modern apple varieties are genetically altered not to produce. That way anybody who wants more, they have to go back to the original supplier. Thus keeping them in business.
I've only heard this from one source, others out there may know better.



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