meat from America

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Steveharford

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #30 on: November 05, 2020, 17:56 »
That’s very true.Although  I think our animal welfare is so much different to many of those abroad but I know that the ‘free range’ eggs I buy from the supermarket are anything but in reality. I know a farmer who supplies them. He’s got 60000 layers in a chicken house. If he keeps the door open at one end, they are free to range. In reality not many venture out as they are too frightened to, as they aren’t used to it.

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grinling

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #31 on: November 05, 2020, 20:47 »
1 farmer here did not count his chickens and 1 was walking up the road  :D

We are exporting beef to America.

Bird Flu has been confirmed twice in this country,2 different strains

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CHRISDONOHUE

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #32 on: November 06, 2020, 23:30 »
In an ideal world, retailers in this country can perhaps insist on high standards of production and may even be able to implement reliable checks to control whether the high standards are being met.   But in a world where supermarkets buy a very cheap product like garlic from China which is easily produced in this country or in Spain, there must be an even greater temptation for supermarkets to buy the much higher cost beef from America at the very cheapest price irrespective of the standards used to produce it.   How are consumers able to determine how beef from America has been produced without government-imposed classification they are extremely unlikely to implement?

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jezza

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2020, 11:46 »
Hello I've been chatting to a guy whose just taken on a contract to supply a large conglomerate with chickens,they have to be fresh so they're packed chilled into containers shipped to  Brazil processed into into various parts coated in spice mixes UK sourced  then shipped back deep frozen 3 weeks later and sold as fresh coated chicken  the supplier says he can have them processed in 4 hours and on the shelves the same day  and the  processing plant have the little red tractor badge farm assurance   jezza

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Subversive_plot

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2020, 22:18 »
In an ideal world, retailers in this country can perhaps insist on high standards of production and may even be able to implement reliable checks to control whether the high standards are being met.   

Exactly correct.  We agree.

But in a world where supermarkets buy a very cheap product like garlic from China which is easily produced in this country or in Spain, there must be an even greater temptation for supermarkets to buy the much higher cost beef from America at the very cheapest price irrespective of the standards used to produce it.   How are consumers able to determine how beef from America has been produced without government-imposed classification they are extremely unlikely to implement?

I'm not sure I follow the logic here.  Beef from America is much higher cost, so supermarkets are tempted to buy it because of it's very cheap price?

Importers in any country should be responsible for ensuring that imported products meet the standards of their country.  Food produced for import-export market is usually produced by larger commodity producers, typically the producer has many satellite farms, the producing company sets standards for the feed used, cleanliness standards, etc.  The producer wants very uniform quality, and can't work with farms that cannot meet production quality standards (if quality is excellent at 99% of farms but terrible at 1%, the 1% will drag down the price of the 99%). Any kind of meat production has very narrow profit margins, this dictates strict quality control by the producing company. 

The importer, as the customer, has a lot to say about the standards followed and quality of the product.  They can dictate that government-imposed production standards are met so that classification standards are attained, verified by inspections.
I know we are in a global economy because my favorite gardening hat, purchased in the United States, was made in China by a Swiss company and has a label in Spanish.  (They all deserve their piece of the pie, wouldn't you agree? We are all in this world together.)

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John

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2020, 00:17 »
Part of the problem here is that despite the UK government saying over and over they will not allow imports from the USA or anywhere else that fall outside of our standards some people in the media keep stating they will.
One of the unexpected consequences of government involvement in food standards is the imposition of rules that make little sense. But I'm getting perilously near to being political and we stick to dinner party rules here - no politics, religion or sex. :)
If nothing else, I think we've all had enough politics to last a while recently!
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Aunt Sally

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2020, 00:33 »
I’ve got my eye on you, John  :nowink:
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Subversive_plot

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2020, 19:31 »
Somewhat related from an animal welfare standpoint: I just saw that The Netherlands is culling all farm-raised mink due to coronavirus risks, unless I misunderstood the story. I do feel sorry for these intelligent animals living out their lives in tiny cages.  I thought that the fur industry was mostly a thing of the past.

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Aunt Sally

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #38 on: November 09, 2020, 23:21 »
Fur farming has been illegal in Britain since 2000 and it is illegal to trade any fur animal here too.  It’s illegal in many EU countries but it will take a long time to stop the practice in some other countries if ever.

All mink is being kulled  in  Denmark, so that’s probably the end of the fur industry there.

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rowlandwells

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2020, 17:59 »
I agree John to much politics makes me a dull boy we just need to suck it and see what happens across the big apple

that's a bit of good news Aunty I won't need to order the wife a fur coat now  :D

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John

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Re: meat from America
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2020, 19:12 »
I just watched an interesting video on YouTube about egg standards. The US & EU standards are opposite. Our eggs are illegal there and vice versa. Both make sense. Funny old world.



 

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