Rhubarb chard

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rowlandwells

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Rhubarb chard
« on: July 30, 2020, 18:44 »
I was looking at something new to grow next year and I came across Rhubarb chard in my catalogue it says the leaves can be cooked like spinach and the ribs treated like asparagus after picking young stems it will produce new growth?

as I'm a bit unsure :unsure: if i should grow this variety or not i wondered if any of our members has grew Rhubarb chard and if it worth growing and cooking any info appreciated

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mumofstig

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2020, 19:02 »
I grow Rhubarb chard, and eat it just as chard (like spinach)
Quote
and the ribs treated like asparagus after picking young stems it will produce new growth?
likening the stems to asparagus is pushing it a bit, I just  cut the stems off of mine  :nowink:
but, yes, you can keep picking the new leaves for ages, when mine looks a bit rough I cut it right back and it regrows :)
Lesley x
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Mr Dog

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2020, 19:52 »
Monty always says that the British eat the leaves and discard the stems whereas the French eat the stems and discard the leaves! We eat both, usually in curries, chillies and bolognaise type dishes, although I don't grow as much now we don't have guinea pigs who absolutely loved it

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mrsbean

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2020, 21:19 »
I saute the stems of all chard, like others have said use leaves as spinach, then i mix both together. Thats one way.

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Yorkie

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2020, 22:51 »
Just in case you were wondering, it's called Rhubarb chard because of its colour, not its taste!
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lettice

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2020, 08:26 »
I grow Rhubarb Chard.
Do just eat the leaves and discard the stems.
Have eaten the stems in the past, they were much like the leaves in taste.
I grow so much of it with regular picking that the leaves do just fine for many servings.

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New shoot

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2020, 11:20 »
The coloured chards - particularly the red ones - can be a strong taste and the ribs can be tough, which is why some people don't tend to eat them.

I have grown one called Fire Fresh this year and is a big improvement on ones I have tried in the past.  I cut the stems out, but store them in the fridge in a plastic bag, with the leaves in a separate bag.  The leaves are mild and more like spinach than chard.  The stems are also mild and tender and cook up well.  I have braised them in the oven in a covered dish to go with a roast dinner and chopped them into a stir-fry.  It has been a hit with OH as well.  He loves chard leaves, but usually looks at the stems with trepidation.  I think likening the stems to asparagus is bit of a stretch, but these stems are pretty nice to eat :)

Mine was sown direct just prior to lockdown in March and is standing proud now.  I have been picking leaves off it for weeks and it looks like it will go on for months yet.

If you want a good green and white one I can recommend Green Wave or Fordhook Giant.

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snowdrops

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2020, 16:33 »
I saute the stems of all chard, like others have said use leaves as spinach, then i mix both together. Thats one way.

Yes I do that with my Swiss chard, in fact Iíve sown some today! I cook the stems in a little vegetable stock with lots of black pepper & shred the leaves & throw on the top for a few minutes before the end of cooking time so they are more or less steamed.
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rowlandwells

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2020, 18:07 »
thanks all for your replies its given me food for thought :D

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Subversive_plot

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Re: Rhubarb chard
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2020, 08:32 »
I've grown rhubarb chard in the past and will grow it this winter here.

I eat both leaves and stems.  The stems I cut into short pieces after washing and cook (boil) before adding to the leaves, which I cook briefly by sauteeing. 

It all tastes better and is less tough if you use the leaves while young.  I mean while the leaves are young, it's too late for me to use any of it while I'm young!  ::)
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