Codling Moth

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Russell Atterbury

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  • Location: Kaliningrad, Russia
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Codling Moth
« on: May 23, 2020, 13:51 »
Just a bit of difference to vegetable talk, I thought it might be interesting for anyone with fruit trees that have the Codling Moth problem to know the Russian way of dealing with it. Last year our three plum trees were so badly affected that not one fruit was edible. So we sort of shrugged, as in maybe nothing we can do about it, then yesterday a friend called round while we were in the garden and the subject came up. So, the friends answer to this, and we have since found that it does check out with others here, is to put a good double handful of the brown skin of onions into about a litre of boiling water and leave it to make a brew that should be a dark brown colour and strong smelling. If more skins are needed to get a strong solution, then I think the water can be re-heated/skins added. When cool just spray on the trees as from this time of year, even leave the bottle in the garden and have a regular go in moth season. From tomorrow we will be giving it a go. I wonder if this might be an old trick in the UK also, but doing a search doesn't bring anything up.

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Ivor Backache

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Re: Codling Moth
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2020, 12:27 »
The codling moth affects apples and pears. The plum moth damages plums in the same way. You need to break the cycle. I would recommend a pheromone trap, they are only a few pounds, and if the trees are close together you may only need one. It traps the males onto a sticky pad. I use one each year very successfully.
Last year my plum tree suffered badly from brown rot (no cure) , so during winter I pruned it hard and sprayed with a fungicide. I have sacrificed this years crop hoping to  break the cycle.
Spraying one tree which had been pruned was not easy, spraying 3 mature trees in leaf, well I wish you good luck, and you will have to do it several times to maintain the smell.

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Russell Atterbury

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Re: Codling Moth
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2020, 11:42 »
Here in Kaliningrad Ivor, the methods of gardening in general are a bit archaic to say the least. I can't imagine pheromone traps being available, I haven't seen one. And talking to people, this onion thing seems like it works, but yes, the idea is to keep a spray bottle in the garden and give a bit of a go regularly. Today I did just that for the first time, and I will post later in the season as to the outcome.



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