Moving tomatoe plant

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Moving tomatoe plant
« on: September 18, 2019, 14:19 »
I literally dug up a tomato plant and moved it into a raised bed in a garden room. Ordinary roof. Warm and tons of sun as it is at the top of a hill. I moved it because I doubt if the Tom's will ripen. It's a yellow stuffer. Did it about 3 days ago. Leafs are curling, top Toms feel like they are rotting, rest feel alright. I fancied digging up another one which won't ripen on time
 Anyone else done this and was it successful?

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JayG

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2019, 15:50 »
I suspect you will lose more from the disturbance of digging it up and replanting than you will gain from having it in a warmer place.

As long as the tomatoes have reached more or less their normal full size and aren't still hard and green, they should ripen perfectly well off the plant in a warm spot indoors.
They will ripen quicker in a container (e.g. plastic supermarket meat tray) if stored in layers (the ethylene they produce helps ripening) but if some are already going soft you will need to keep a close eye on them.
Sow your seeds, plant your plants. What's the difference? A couple of weeks or more when answering possible queries!

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2019, 18:51 »
I suspect you will lose more from the disturbance of digging it up and replanting than you will gain from having it in a warmer place.

As long as the tomatoes have reached more or less their normal full size and aren't still hard and green, they should ripen perfectly well off the plant in a warm spot indoors.
They will ripen quicker in a container (e.g. plastic supermarket meat tray) if stored in layers (the ethylene they produce helps ripening) but if some are already going soft you will need to keep a close eye on them.
I am afraid the are not at full size and they are hard and green.
Oh well worth a try

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DHM

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2019, 06:43 »
To be honest, having seen how quickly tomatoes wilt just though a missed watering, I'd avoid moving any more as the plants arent really hardy enough to withstand it.

If you haven't done so aleady, remove some of the leaves to allow the sun to get to them, any stem leaves lower than the lowest truss and pinch the tops out to concentrate the plants energy on those fruits. Dont completely strip the plant of all its leaves, just remove enough to let air circulate freely and allow the sun to hit them.

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Aunt Sally

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2019, 09:49 »
Sliced green tomatoes, fried with a sprinkle of salt and sugar are delicious with a cooked breakfast.
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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2019, 19:22 »
Sliced green tomatoes, fried with a sprinkle of salt and sugar are delicious with a cooked breakfast.
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cc

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2019, 10:44 »
Sliced green tomatoes, fried with a sprinkle of salt and sugar are delicious with a cooked breakfast.
Alas not a good idea for these tomatoes.  They are yellow stuffer not much inside them. Have Tom's which will not all harvest before winter will try them. Thanks

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cc

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2019, 10:48 »
On the other hand the yellow stuffer is looking a little better may make it after all. Weather station in "garden room " says yesterday (miserable day) was minimum 10 degrees  centigrade with maximum of 35! I have yet to insulate the roof.

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2019, 12:30 »
Well would you believe it??
IMG_20190930_122912_5.jpg

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cc

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Re: Moving tomatoe plant
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2019, 13:27 »
Got full harvest in the end and even some new tomatoes appearing. Plant itself looks dire.



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