Fresh'ish horse manure

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marcofez

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2013, 23:12 »
I do exactly as you do Gavin. Spread the manure all over the plot. Worked for my Dad and his mates, and so far, works for me to!! :)
Sometimes I put cardboard down first and then spread manure on top. This all gets weathered down and is great to plant in.  :D

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gavinjconway

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2013, 00:08 »
This is encouraging as I've picked up a few fresh bags at the weekend.

I was always lead to believe that you need to rot down hot manures because of the potential for food poisoning?

Gavin do you prep your beds with fresh poo in autumn or sping?


Hi Ema - it depends when it gets delivered which varies dependant on the local stables when they deliver to our site. If its there I get and put on asap.. So basically to answer your question - anytime from autumn when the crops are out till just before I plant in Spring..
Now a member of the 10 Ton club.... 2013  harvested 588 Kg from 165 sq mt..

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Dai

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2013, 00:33 »
Ok so now im confused.
I spread some 2 month old manure on my spud patch in late november maby early december which i hope will be fine by planting time in mid march but is there really a possibility for food poisoning from fresh manure?

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JayG

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2013, 09:09 »
Lots to read if you Gurgle "Pathogens in animal manure"

In a nutshell, there are potential risks from using most sorts of manure, especially when fresh, but they are pretty minimal in practice unless you do something really inadvisable like putting fresh manure on your salad crops shortly before eating them (and then don't wash the produce properly first.)

Most veg are of course cooked before eating, which kills any potential nasties anyway.
Sow your seeds, plant your plants. What's the difference? A couple of weeks or more when answering possible queries!

One of the best things about being an orang-utan is the fact that you don't lose your good looks as you get older

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gavinjconway

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2013, 10:31 »
Dai - You tend to live... I'm still alive after living on a farm, eating farm animals, farm milk, farm veg grown in manure, farm water from the well.... etc... etc...  everything that Google and others say one shouldn't do..

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ilan

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2013, 10:33 »
The biggest risk is if you put manure on the plot that has come from a meat eating animal so def no dog or cat  manure nor any meat in the compost bins
This is the first age that has ever paid much attention to the future which is ironic since we may not have one !(Arthur c Clarke)

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Stewpot

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #21 on: February 05, 2013, 11:50 »
Ihave used horse manure for years, but always leave it for 5 to 6 months before using it, you do get a few weeds off it, but so what thats what a hoe is for.

It works well with potaoes but place the manure below the potato and then soil above it , or rotavate it in well, doing this i have never had scab on my potatoes.

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conteasy

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Re: Fresh'ish horse manure
« Reply #22 on: February 05, 2013, 16:58 »
No need to wait for a 'bin', just make a brick shaped heap with slightly sloping sides, earth up the sides and cover the top.  That will give you a better product than a bin or frame.  If it's a big heap and fresh enough to heat up, make a couple of chimneys from bunches of twigs, to prevent it 'burning' and losing nutrients.  If it needs turning, that's easier with a heap too.

Partially rotted material encourages fungal conditions in the crops, if you want to avoid these then only add well rotted manure or compost to the soil unless it will have time to finish breaking down before you need to sow or plant.  If partially rotted is all you have and you have to use it, then when your plants are growing, make a tea from Horsetail (equisetum) and water the ground around them with it to ward off fungal infections.



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