Planning ahead

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Clueless

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Planning ahead
« on: May 28, 2007, 16:38 »
I got some great replies to my earlier question about using a rotovator on tough ground. I now find that I will be having another area (200m x 6m) dug up anyway (with a JCB, for a different reason). It will solve a load of problems to simply move my planned veg patch over there. The digging won't be done until mid-August though. I'm guessing it will then be too late to grow anything this year, so is there anything I could / should do this year to make next year easier or more successful?
Is there anything that would be worth doing whilst the ground is excavated? The JCB will be going quite deep.

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WG.

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Planning ahead
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2007, 18:29 »
Would help if we knew where you were - or even what type of climate you have.  "Well North, not UK" is pretty darned vague ...  :wink:

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Aunt Sally

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Planning ahead
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2007, 19:04 »
Could be North Pole or even North Island New Zealand  :roll:
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Ann

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Planning ahead
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2007, 20:15 »
Looking at his other posts he's in Finland

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Clueless

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« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2007, 14:41 »
I hadn't realised my location is such a big issue! Anyway, I have changed my profile to show Finland as my location. We are under snow for 4 months or more each winter, with frosts for much longer. Summers are good though, with long daylight hours. My local weather station is:
http://www.weather-forecast.com/locations/keuru1.forecast.shtml

What I am trying to find out is whether I should somehow prepare the ground this year ready for next year, and if so, how? Should I put anything into the ground when the digger replaces the earth removed during the excavations? If so, what? I'm thinking in terms of fertilizers or whatever.
Out of interest, how would the answer differ if I had been, say, in Cornwall?

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Aunt Sally

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« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2007, 15:03 »
It's really helpful if we know roundabout where you live as we than change the advice we give to suit you.  For instance I planted my runner beans and sweet corn out at the beginning of May.  I don't think I would advise you to though clueless  :wink:

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flowerlady

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Planning ahead
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2007, 15:03 »
If you were able to get hold of horse manue, I'd cover the whole lot with 8" of the stuff, clamp it all down with back plastic, until next year when you could dig it itf you wanted .... and in the meantime plant through the plastic  :tongue2:

Squash grow brilliantly this way ... how long are your summers?
"He who plants a garden plants happiness"

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Clueless

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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2007, 15:31 »
> clamp it all down with back plastic
What is the plastic for?

> Squash grow brilliantly this way
hmm ... I don't even know what squash is
I want to grow potates, parsnips, sprouts, carrots, that type of thing. Plus salad stuff I suppose.

> how long are your summers
Summer is June, July & August. Long days in the summer, so lots of sun hours. Sunrise to sunset is 19 hours today for example.

Thanks for your help.

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WG.

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Planning ahead
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2007, 15:39 »
Quote from: "Clueless"
I hadn't realised my location is such a big issue! ...  We are under snow for 4 months or more each winter, with frosts for much longer. ... Out of interest, how would the answer differ if I had been, say, in Cornwall?

Well they can grow winter lettuce and spring onions in Cornwall for a start ...  :roll:

1. make sure your JCB saves the top soil to go back on top

2. incorporate as much manure as you can get your hands on (even if it means missing out on carrot / parsnip for one year

3. prepare a garlic bed and plant as soon as possible after August

4. not much point trying to containerise winter brassicas for transplanting, I guess

5. lay drains in subsoil, if required

6. incorporate permanent paths if so desired

7. prepare greenhouse base if so desired

8. prepare bases for compost bins if so desired

9.  incorporate underground tank for water storage if desired (can double as a greenhouse base)

10. incorporate anti-vermin measures, e.g. wire sunk around perimeter if you have Cornwall rabbits / moles OR above-ground support if elk are more prevalent  :wink:

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Clueless

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« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2007, 07:31 »
Quote from: "whisky_golf"
make sure your JCB saves the top soil to go back on top

Good point. I would hope they would do this anyway but I'll be sure to point it out.

Quote from: "whisky_golf"
incorporate as much manure as you can get your hands on

Manure could be a problem (sourcing & transport). Commercially available fertilizer that I can get delivered would be much easier, but I haven't a clue what is available or what I would need. Would my choice depend on the soil I have and what I intend to plant? What should I look for?

Quote from: "whisky_golf"
prepare a garlic bed and plant as soon as possible after August

A new idea for me, and I like it. So I should plant this year to get a crop next year? Will the plants survive a harsh winter?

Quote from: "whisky_golf"
incorporate underground tank for water storage if desired

Oh that's a big question on its own. For example, making a tank that would stand up to being frozen solid every winter - it could be -40C here. A tank would be handy, but I need to get some local advice on that.

Quote from: "whisky_golf"
incorporate anti-vermin measures, e.g. wire sunk around perimeter if you have Cornwall rabbits / moles OR above-ground support if elk are more prevalent


I hadn't thought of that at all, but it makes sense. We do have rabbits & hares, and the occasional deer. I haven't seen any elk within a km of the house though - they are very shy.

Thanks for your help.

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WG.

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Planning ahead
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2007, 09:04 »
Fertiliser : I am organic and hence other replies may suit you better.  Dried blood, chicken manure pellets or bone meal would be all I'd consider using but manure is best.

Garlic : Search for other postings from me (or others).  Search instructions at bottom

Water tank : Oh, so it is relevant to my answers where you are located :!:  I'd imagine 60cm under ground level would not freeze but, as you say, local advice is best.

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