Barbecue ash

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Steveharford

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Barbecue ash
« on: May 03, 2013, 06:50 »
I understand that wood ash is good for spreading on the onion patch so am wondering if the same can be said of charcoal ash from the barbecue. I would guess it is effectively the same stuff. Any fat etc from the cooking would have burnt off ?  If so, are there any other uses for it in the garden?

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fatcat1955

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2013, 07:47 »
Garlic and Raspberrie's.

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JayG

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2013, 08:01 »
Ash from plain charcoal (i.e. not self-lighting) should be OK - there is a bit more of a question mark over briquettes which could contain some heavy metal residues because they may contain coal as well as wood charcoal.

The amounts of contamination would be tiny, but I'd play safe and only use ash from wood charcoal on the onion patch (not that I've been able to stage enough barbecues in the last few years to have an ash disposal problem!)  ::)
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samnorfolk

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2013, 08:24 »
What about ash from loads of burnt newspaper??

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mumofstig

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2013, 09:21 »
that's fine or they can be torn up and used in layers in with the greens.

I always wrap my veg peelings in paper and the whole lot rots together  :)
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https://chat.allotment-garden.org/index.php?topic=56565.msg666947#msg666947

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ConfusedGardener

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2013, 10:26 »
So coal ash from our multi-fuel burner is a no no? I was going to scatter it on the ground where I'm considering putting a bed in!

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JayG

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2013, 11:13 »
The amounts of toxic and heavy metal residues in coal ash are very small, but it's up to the individual to decide whether they would rather avoid taking any risk with their fruit and veg, no matter how small.

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ConfusedGardener

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2013, 11:31 »
Thanks for the advice Jay. I think I'll avoid it to be on the safe side.

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Stree

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2013, 11:44 »
I just stick to wood ash. Not literally, it`s not that sticky.
I burned a wheelbarrow full of tree thinnings and small logs last night to make some potash for my tomato compost.
 I do not grow anything on the greenhouse floor and spread coal ash from my workshop stove on there, and NO weeds grow anymore. So would I use it on my garden? Take a wild guess.

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Steveharford

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2013, 12:27 »
Interesting, because not do many years ago it was common practise to spread soot on the patch before planting. One reason was because the black absorbed the heat and warmed up the soil quicker. I assume it was also considered to be beneficial nutrient wise.

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Stree

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2013, 16:53 »
Here is an old article lifted for you. Please note that the ashes referred to are wood ash, not coal or other ashes.


CECIL SOLLY’SCecil Solly - The Original Master Gardener
GARDEN NOTEBOOK:
Ashes & Soot

Wood ashes were once one of the chief sources of that very valuable plant food, potash, for both farms and gardens.

Good quality wood ashes contain from five to seven percent potash, from 1-1/2 to two percent phosphoric acid, and from 25 to 30 percent calcium compounds. Hardwood ashes contain more potash than softwood ashes. Either kind loses much of its value if exposed to weather or rain so that its soluble chemicals are leached out.

If they are not leached or exposed to the air, wood ashes contain, in the form of oxides or carbonates, all of the mineral elements that were used to make the tree wood from which the ash was formed.

Potassium carbonate, calcium carbonate or calcium oxide are all present in comparatively large quantities in wood ash, which gives it a strong alkaline reaction and the power to neutralize acid soils. However, the value of the wood ashes as a plant food depends more on the potash content than on the lime.

Wood ashes should be applied to the soil some time in advance of planting and should be mixed well into the ground, not left on top.

Wood ashes have been used with great success in many parts of the flower garden where it not only fertilizes but greatly helps to prevent mildew and other like diseases in such plants as roses, chrysanthemums, lupine and delphiniums.

In the vegetable garden, wood ashes should be used in large quantities in every part of the soil. Every vegetable will benefit greatly – and be less likely to get disease. This is especially noticeable in tomatoes.

In view of their relatively low plant food content, wood ashes can be used in any ordinary quantities without danger of burning. An average application would be five to ten pounds per 100 square feet.

Wood ashes from a sawdust burner are much more liable to burn little plants, so this material should be used as often but more sparingly. Sawdust ash should always be sifted to take out the “lumps,” which should be discarded.

SOOT

There are many uses to which soot can be put in the garden which were widely known decades ago, but which have passed out of use lately. The soot that is good to use is from wood fires. Never use oil soot in the garden.

Soot is the most valuable fertilizer for many kinds of plants. It imparts a dark color to the soil, which assists in the absorption of heat and so renders it more suitable for early crops. When applied to the soil in spring it is changed by bacteria into nitrates, in which form it is available as a plant food. Nitrates increase growth so that soot may be applied to ground on which lawns, shrubs or flowers are to be grown. These plants require large amounts of nitrates to enable them to grow quickly and healthily.

While many of the uses to which soot can be put are widely known, there are one or two points not so familiar to the average gardener. Soot, fresh from the chimney, contains about 12 percent water, 35-50 percent ash, and the remainder various volatile substances which are rich in ammonia and which form the chief fertilizing properties. The ash contains calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium and sodium, the first four of which are valuable plant foods, as they are combined with phosphoric and sulfuric acids, while silicates are also present.

If kept dry and allowed to stand for about three months, soot becomes mellowed, when it safely can be used as nitrogenous manure, in powder or liquid form.

Soot can be used to scatter along the rows of onions, carrots, turnips and radish to prevent root worms or maggots.

Horticordially,
Cecil Solly

The Original Master Gardener

Chimney (coal) soot was used to control black spot on roses, it may have had other uses that I am not aware of. I believe its constituents are very different from those in coal ash. I have a mound of coal ash here,and it is like pink flour. All it would do is suffocate and poison the soil.

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Steveharford

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Re: Barbecue ash
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2013, 18:38 »
Excellent. Thankyou Stree. Now I know why my dad ways had a plastic sack of soot in his garden. Wood ash sounds the stuff though so I will spread the BBQ ash in future as long as it is the true charcoal. 


 

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