lets talk about compost's

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rowlandwells

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lets talk about compost's
« on: July 30, 2021, 15:20 »
as we are about mid season i though it a good time get some feedback on compost's and what you've been using this season all be it peat based or peat free

there seems to be a strong possibility that peat based compost we be either no longer available for the home gardener to buy and only the commercial growers will be exempt  still buy and use peat based as i understand under the proposed government guidelines  peat based compost's will have a compost tax levied on it possibly per bag? obviously making it more cost effect to buy peat free and not peat based

now having said all that that's only what I've been told by certain people in the trade weather it comes to fruition is yet to be seen and how this  effects  the home gardener who has been using peat free for many years

so have most of you home gardeners turned to using peat free this season  as a good alternative to peat based and had fantastic results never to go back to using any peat based or are you still not totally convinced peat free is a good substitute? and if the price of peat based is hyped up will you be paying the additional cost to stay with peat based if its available or will you go with peat free?

for me I'm still using peat based all be its said to be reduced  peat content quite frankly in my opinion I'm not convinced peat free is going to prove as good for both seeding and potting on but i could be wrong if the peat manufacturers get the balance rite then its not going to be a problem for the home gardener like myself however if its not up to the peat based standards then we could end up with problem  for both seeding and potting because the commercial growers don't seen to be convinced to switch to peat free and so have  have been given the opportunity to buy and use peat based that gives me some concerns why there not supporting the use of peat free

and its seems when watching most of the BBC gardening programs using peat free seems to rear its head that we must use peat free and as I've said many times on this site I'm into gardening to get results and  enjoy the fruits of my labour buy growing and eating fresh veg and freezing any surplus to enjoy at a later date  if I'm not going to achieve this because of sub standard materials then I mite just as well pack up growing and buy my veg from a supermarket

i know its a long and lengthy topic but i would welcome your replies on this matter as i feel its very important to get feedback on this subject of what other gardeners feel about using both peat based or peat free for a balanced opinion




 








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mumofstig

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2021, 15:26 »
I've not found a consistently good peat-free compost yet for seed sowing :(

Though most of the peat-free composts seem to work ok, with plenty of feeding, for baskets and containers IMO
Lesley x
I'm not good, I'm not bad - I'm just me, and sometimes I have to apologise for that ;)

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Christine

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2021, 15:54 »
It's the water retention that seems to be the problem with peat free composts in baskets and containers. What solves one eco problem causes another in the extra use of water.

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meterman

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2021, 23:42 »
I always try to put cut up cheap disposable nappies in the bottom of containers(not used😁) biodegradable and high water retention much cheaper than water retention crystals and more effective

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cc

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2021, 12:31 »
Must say I haven't noticed any difference. But I haven't done a true trial. As lots of people plants seeds in the ground why would there be?.
I generally just by cheapest.

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Nobbie

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2021, 19:31 »
Ive used B&Q peat based and Lidl peat free and got decent results with both to be fair. The only issue I have with the peat free stuff is the amount of rubbish in it which requires to be sieved out. Bits of plastic and large splinters of wood.

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jambop

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2021, 20:13 »

Glad the debate is about compost and not manure because that would just be talking a load of .... :lol:

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Longshanks

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 10:42 »
I've only ever used peat free compost and it seems to be OK.  A bit more expensive, but seems to be the right thing to do. I did have one bag that seemed to contain a lot of hair and fibre.

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jambop

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2021, 12:15 »
I've only ever used peat free compost and it seems to be OK.  A bit more expensive, but seems to be the right thing to do. I did have one bag that seemed to contain a lot of hair and fibre.

I get compost like that over here but it is usually just very cheap stuff I am using to top off my raised beds it is a bit like partially composted wool or something of that sort. I also find in this cheaper sort of compost there is a lot of wood products bark and wood chippings that are not fully composted. I don't complain about it because these compost are intended for adding to the garden soil.

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Subversive_plot

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Re: lets talk about compost's
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2021, 11:03 »
I buy just a few bags of mushroom compost each year, it is great stuff, and holds moisture well.

Most of the compost I buy comes in bulk from from the city, made from leaf and limb waste and biosolids. That compost has a 20+ year history of production, the process is closely controlled to kill pathogens (temperature), and is routinely tested for chemical quality and pathogens.  It is highly sought after in our area, $20 will buy a cubic yard (dirt cheap "dirt", buying that volume in bagged mushroom compost would cost $143). You can grow just about anything in it, and it drains well. It does have some wood fiber "fines" in it, so I let it decompose a few months more in my beds before planting root vegetables in it.

I also produce my own compost, mostly cut grass, pulled weeds, and chopped leaves.  I mostly keep vegetable garden waste out of that.  I have a simple two bin system, I'm processing about a cubic yard in that system now.
Please stay safe!  Wear a mask, and observe social distancing!



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