Moving Fruit Trees

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Dantheman

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Moving Fruit Trees
« on: January 23, 2016, 19:18 »
Hi,

I'm moving some fruit tree on my allotment from the ground (photo 1) to big pots (photo 2 an empty one).  I need some advice please whats the best way about doing it?

1. Dig up and leave all roots.
or
2. Dig up and lightly prune back the roots.

Once I've got them all in pots I'm adding a pipe down to the roots for watering,  I was wondering what's the best mulch for them? Benefits for each please.

1. Bark
or
2. Pee shingle.

Thanks

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« Last Edit: January 23, 2016, 19:19 by Dantheman »
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Trikidiki

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Re: Friut trees
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2016, 10:27 »
Do you know what rootstock they are growing on? If they aren't on a dwarfing stock (e.g. M27) they aren't likely to thrive in pots. MM106 which is semi-dwarfing would be the largest I would consider for pots. I have an Egremont Russet on MM106 which had been in a pot for five years and hasn't produced a flower and was hanging on for dear life. I planted it out last year and it now has flower buds.

If they aren't on a rooting stock I would suggest donating them to someone who has space for them in the ground and start again with some 'dwarfs'.

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Dantheman

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Re: Friut trees
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2016, 15:22 »
Hi,

They are all dwarf rootstock.

Thanks.

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Trikidiki

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Re: Friut trees
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2016, 18:49 »

That's good for you.

I would leave them with as much root as possible unless you are having to wrap them around inside the pot.

There is a possibility that the bark could cause some nitrogen depletion but on the surface I would think it would be minimal, you can always compensate by ensuring it gets enough nitrogenous fertiliser. I would mix a good dose of Blood, Fish and Bone in with the compost.

I think the mulch is probably down to personal preference, personally I'd prefer bark.



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