Rotting Tomotoes

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andyww2013

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Rotting Tomotoes
« on: July 31, 2021, 08:23 »
Hello,

Noticed that all my tomato fruits (several different variety’s) are all rotting.  Plants seemed healthy about a month ago, then I noticed a lot of leaves had started to go brown (cut these away).  Thought that this was blight.  But now the fruits are just rotting instead of changing colour.  Any idea what this might be please?
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jambop

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2021, 08:26 »
They are suffering from blight.

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John

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2021, 09:25 »
Classic blight - see Tomato Troubles & Diseases
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Subversive_plot

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2021, 06:24 »
Yes, late blight.

Sorry about that. Don't grow any tomatoes or other solanaceous vegetables (potatoes, aubergines, peppers, etc.) in that same space for at least 3 years. Instead, rotate to other types of vegetables.

 Keep the waste from those types of plants out of the compost pile.
Please stay safe!  Wear a mask, and observe social distancing!

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AnneB

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2021, 09:30 »
I beg to differ about not growing tomatoes, potatoes etc in the same space for 3 years.

You should definitely make sure you remove old tubers, even small ones, as they will carry live spores.  If you do that, there is no reason not to plant in the same place other than the usual good practice of crop rotation.  In small plots it isn't always possible to rotate completely.

Blight is wind borne not soil borne.

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John

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2021, 16:46 »
Blight is wind borne not soil borne.
Whilst basically true, best advice is to rotate to help control blight. Bit tricky in a greenhouse border  :D

If blight is often a problem in your area, limiting to resistant varieties of tomatoes and potatoes is sensible. Note resistant isn't totally immune but it helps.

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John

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2021, 10:00 »
I looked a little further into this and apparently the latest strains may / probably form spores that can survive in the soil. Also the USA tends to have early blight which is a different problem to the UK's late blight

In a greenhouse may just halt the spread if you can keep the humidity very low and remove all affected fruits and leaves. These should be burnt, binned to council facilities or buried deeply - below 40cm

The problem with blight is that there are different strains that mutate so resistant plants one year may not resist the next. There are no chemical controls available to the home gardener - although farmers in the UK spend £50M pa on chemicals to fight potato blight. What a shame we can't just whip up some Bordeaux mixture from easily available copper sulphate and lime as describe in Dig for Victory  :)


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jambop

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 19:16 »
What a shame we can't just whip up some Bordeaux mixture from easily available copper sulphate and lime as describe in Dig for Victory  :)

I believe the organic growers association are allowed to do just that!

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John

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2021, 20:24 »
The law is different in the UK to France and Bordeaux mix is not approved for use in organic systems anymore. Neither can anyone sell it as a pesticide. But you can buy the ingredients and mix your own if you wish.

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jambop

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2021, 16:33 »
The law is different in the UK to France and Bordeaux mix is not approved for use in organic systems anymore. Neither can anyone sell it as a pesticide. But you can buy the ingredients and mix your own if you wish.

You will pardon me if I say it defies logic to ban the use of a product but not forbid the purchase of the ingredients to make your own product? Being from a scientific background I know the two components of BM are relatively innocuous and I am not about to get involved in the rights and wrongs of the use of the stuff but ask the question what do the wine growers in the UK use to protect their vines from mildew? If garden tomato growers could lay their hands on some of that they could probably save their crops. Wine growers in France still use large amounts of BM but the use has to be strictly noted along with any other pesticides or the like that are used so that the rules of the appellation are adhered to.

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John

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2021, 19:28 »
Oh the logic is pretty easy to understand. BM needs expensive testing to be approved for the pesticide list and it's so easy and cheap to make that nobody thinks it worth that investment. Let's face it, home growers don't count in the eyes of DEFRA

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jambop

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2021, 20:06 »
Oh the logic is pretty easy to understand. BM needs expensive testing to be approved for the pesticide list and it's so easy and cheap to make that nobody thinks it worth that investment. Let's face it, home growers don't count in the eyes of DEFRA

Yes John I can understand that but is there no policing of the use of home made BM? For example if I was living in the UK and having the scientific knowledge I would be making my own and using in my garden it if its use was not policed. I could see the police would rely on people informing them of it being used but how many people would actually know it was being applied to a few tomato plants each year? It is a moral issue really and it is just my opinion but there are far far worse things going on for the government to be on the backs of a few householders who may choose to use BM. I am not being belligerent on the subject I understand it is the law in the UK so there is a legal reason not to use it but on the other hand you are saying people could make their own BM and use it and that seems a little odd to me. Or is the situation that the sale of ready to dilute BM is banned but not the actual buying of the chemicals required to make your own at home? As you say it is a very easy spray solution to prepare . I will leave it at that.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 08:12 by jambop »

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Benny130

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2021, 12:27 »
Would ripe tomatoes that appear to be "alright" that you had taken from the same plant as ones affected with blight be "alright"?

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New shoot

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2021, 13:09 »
They may develop blight over the next few days if not used straight away, but would be fine to eat if not and after a quick wash.

I have picked green tomatoes off blighted plants and put them on the windowsill to ripen before now. Some started showing signs of blight and had to be binned, some not and did ripen.

Luck of the draw on that one.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 13:12 by New shoot »

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Sparkyweb

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Re: Rotting Tomotoes
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2021, 20:31 »
Some of mine are like that too. My toms are in pots - should i move them or dispose of the plants? The other toms on the same plants look ok for the moment…



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