Powdery mildew

  • 4 Replies
  • 1675 Views
*

viettaclark

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Southampton
  • 1966
Powdery mildew
« on: August 03, 2011, 23:30 »
My crops suffer badly from this every year and although I know now not to water the leaves because it creates the conditions it loves, I still get it.
I think some could be because I plant quite closely in my raised beds and there isn't enough air circulation. The garden is also fairly sheltered.
Now I'm wondering if I'm doing it myself by composting mildewy material? My compost gets very hot due to chicken waste, I don't use it for 2 years and I've not noticed any correlation between outbreaks of mildew and use of compost. I didn't put compost on the sugarsnaps and they're the worst. Courgettes, chard, spinach and cucumbers are affected and I expect the perpetual strawbs will get it (along with grey mould) seeing as they're beginning to fruit again now......
Any wise thoughts on why my plants are so susceptible? It's impossible to control! :(

*

JayG

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: South West Sheffield
  • 16337
Re: Powdery mildew
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2011, 12:30 »
Mildew would be only one of probably hundreds of different fungi present in unsterilised compost so I doubt it's that.

It's often a problem as the season progresses because many plants are reaching the end of their life-cycle (getting "ready to rot"!) and the days get progressively cooler, shorter and more humid.

Creating a micro-climate which makes the humidity worse is obviously a bad idea, especially in an already sheltered garden. You are obviously aware of all this; be vigilant about removing old and mildewed leaves which will in itself improve the air circulation and don't leave finished crops in place for the same reason.
Sow your seeds, plant your plants. What's the difference? A couple of weeks or more when answering possible queries!

One of the best things about being an orang-utan is the fact that you don't lose your good looks as you get older

*

emptydraw

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Location: South East Essex
  • 83
Re: Powdery mildew
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2011, 12:38 »
If it becomes a persistent problem, why not try mildew resistant varieties. Our "Tosca" Courgettes are extremely healthy, right next to my outdoor gherkins which are coverded in mildew.
So it does pay to spend some time and pick your varieties carefully.

*

mumofstig

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Kent
  • 53588
Re: Powdery mildew
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2011, 13:07 »
They're also more likely to suffer when the weather is hot and roots are dry.
Keeping the roots well watered helps  :)
Lesley x
I'm not good, I'm not bad - I'm just me, and sometimes I have to apologise for that ;)

*

Kleftiwallah

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: North Wiltshire
  • 3446
Re: Powdery mildew
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2011, 13:16 »

"It is said" .  .  .  .that if you collect mare'stails, bruise it then boil it up in water , strain and then mix with a smidge of soft soap (or Lux flakes), this will keep the powdery mildew at bay.  I don't know if it will reverse an attack but,  you never know if you don't try.     Cheers,  ::)   Tony.
I may be growing OLD, but I refuse to grow UP !



xx
Powdery mildew

Started by harry on Grow Your Own

6 Replies
1800 Views
Last post July 14, 2017, 18:14
by victoria park
xx
powdery mildew

Started by littlejaffa on Grow Your Own

9 Replies
3606 Views
Last post August 25, 2009, 09:57
by sunshineband
xx
Powdery Mildew

Started by rockyracoon on Grow Your Own

5 Replies
2230 Views
Last post June 07, 2010, 19:30
by mr Isaccs
xx
powdery mildew

Started by al78 on Grow Your Own

7 Replies
1055 Views
Last post September 06, 2019, 10:28
by Grubbypaws
 

Page created in 0.314 seconds with 32 queries.

Powered by SMFPacks Social Login Mod
Powered by SMFPacks SEO Pro Mod |