Tomato problem

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AnneB

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Tomato problem
« on: July 10, 2020, 16:01 »
I have a problem with my greenhouse tomatoes. 
The larger ones,  Purple Ukraine, Chocolate Cherokee, Burpee's Jubilee and Greek have all been affected.  At first I thought it was blossom end rot, but it doesn't look quite right for that.
The plants are otherwise healthy. 
Smaller types, Black Cherry, White Cherry, Baby Gazzi, Sweet Aperitif all unaffected.
All types in same compost.  Same varieties in the polytunnel at the allotment all unaffected.
Watered regularly.
Here is a picture of 2 affected fruits.
Any suggestions as to what it is.
20200710_155232.jpg

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mumofstig

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2020, 16:41 »
It doesn't look like blight, or a virus, especially if it is only on the fruit and the leaves/stems are all ok.
Also difficult to understand why it is only the big fruited tomatoes, but may be a mineral deficiency in the compost, as they are more demanding of nutrients.
Not much help, I know - but thought your post deserved a reply, to prove I haven't ignored it.

Lesley x
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AnneB

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2020, 16:50 »
Thanks MoS. I am genuinely puzzled.  I can't find anything like it. 
The fruits are quite hard too where they are developing the black colour.
I am growing them in Dalefoot compost for tomatoes, which reckons you do not need to add feed.  I will try giving the big tomatoes a bit of feed.  The others are doing very well without feed
Polytunnel ones are in the soil and get comfrey tea.

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JayG

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2020, 17:43 »
Very strange given all the circumstances - easy to think it should be BER, but just doesn't quite look 'right.'

Agree with mum - has to be some sort of mineral deficiency - I'd give a tomato feed containing seaweed extract to give the best chance of scoring a hit.
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mumofstig

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2020, 17:49 »
Have you got any seaweed feed/concentrate? That often sorts things out...

snap on the seaweed Jay  :D

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AnneB

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2020, 18:49 »
Yes I have seaweed feed. Will try that. Thanks both.

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jambop

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2020, 19:41 »
I don't  know why if it is some sort of deficiency only the fruit would be affected. I think you have some sort of air borne mold probably cause by fluctuations in the humidity in the greenhouse. The fruits being of mass will allow water vapor to condense on them and give mold a chance to take hold when the greenhouse warms up during the day... repeat over and over?

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mumofstig

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2020, 20:04 »
The discoloration appears to be inside the tomato skin, rather than from a mould on the outside.
BER is an example of a deficiency that shows on the fruit ends, but doesn't show on the leaves - so this kind of deficiency is possible.

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Aunty

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2020, 20:26 »
Id say a mineral deficiency.  Tomatoes are gross feeders and a seaweed feed is what Id give them.
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Aunty

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2020, 20:38 »
Dont over water them as that can wash nutrients out of the compost.

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Subversive_plot

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2020, 05:39 »
Tomatoes often need calcium, have you added calcium to your fertilizer regime?  Calcium nitrate is the most readily plant-available, or gypsum. 
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Growster...

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2020, 06:40 »
Dear old Dr Hessayon shows a pic of a tom with 'Greenback', and although your pic isn't quite the same, he does say that there's a need for more potash and less sunlight!

I'd have thought that comfrey would have dealt with the potash deficiency (if there is one), but maybe a dollop of Tomorite could help!

Never seen this before, so best of luck!

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lettice

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2020, 08:21 »
Not seen tomatoes go like that before at that stage.
That is not blight or Bottom end rot.
Looks more like a mould growing from within the tomato that you are seeing through the skin.

Found a couple of comprehensive lists online  for tomato diseases recently.
Might be worth looking and comparing.

https://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/help-for-the-home-gardener/advice-tips-resources/visual-guides/tomato-fruit-problems.aspx

Diseases and Abiotic Problems of Greenhouse Tomatoes | Mississippi State University Extension Service

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New shoot

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2020, 08:37 »
I haven't used Dalefoot compost and it does sound a bit different from the norm.  Nutrient deficiencies disrupt the normal functions of plant growth.  Viruses usually show as more defined patches.  Nutrient deficiencies can cause malformed fruit, uneven ripening and odd colours right into the centres of things.

When I was studying for my HNC,  my main tutor was an ex-research scientist who had specialised in potatoes and tomatoes.  He was a clever man, but a bit of an anorack.  He would both into almost every subject - plant growth, plant diseases .... I have seen similar pictures, but I can't remember the fine detail of what was wrong.  Seaweed feed is a good provider of all sorts of trace elements though  :)

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jambop

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Re: Tomato problem
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2020, 09:23 »
Question ... why when someone posts about a problem the immediate response is " I think it is a nutrient or mineral deficiency  I suggest feeding with... ?
The plants, we are told, are growing normally but the fruit has been affected so it is a nutrient deficiency ?
I most humbly disagree. I would say there is a much greater probability the reason is one of plant physiology. We have heard that BER is due to a Calcium deficiency ... this is in fact wrong. BER is a physiological problem which renders the plant unable to utilize the available Calcium... not that the soil is deficient in the element. The problem usually occurs due to sudden changes in the growing conditions of the plants... and this is always going to be more noticeable when plants are grown in a situation where these changes can happen very quickly eg. in a greenhouse . The reasons are many and varied eg. over watering , under watering, over feeding even a change from a period dull overcast weather to bright sunny conditions can cause BER . I suggest that the reasons for the problems with the fruit is a either a stress related problem and/or some sort of necrosis due to changes in the growing conditions of the plants.

The thing is that even feeding with a nutrient rich watering will prove nothing. Physiological problems will only affect fruit setting at the time the plants have the problem. You later feed the plants and the rest of the fruit is fine, great it was a nutrient problem after all... no! The plants have since the original event not experienced a similar event and subsequent fruiting is as expected. You see that all the time with BER not all the fruits are affected, this is the reason why.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 09:23 by jambop »



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