HFW Episode 1

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Viv

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HFW Episode 1
« Reply #60 on: January 08, 2008, 15:37 »
The powers that be, are more likely to take notice of a high profile name than the likes of you and me. We have to all get beind the crusade with the big names at the fore to stop the cruelty. maybe when the realise the strength of public opinion then, maybe then something will be done.
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babe

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« Reply #61 on: January 08, 2008, 16:41 »
3.4 million viewers watched last not..... thats none too shabby

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babe

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« Reply #62 on: January 08, 2008, 17:30 »
HFW will be on richard and judy after the break. channel 4

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David.

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« Reply #63 on: January 08, 2008, 18:36 »
Quote from: "Country Bill"
If single mothers are so skint, why are so many overweight..?


Quote from: "john"
Poor diet, too much fats and sugars, not enough vegetables are a pretty good start to obesity.


And the reason in most cases, is that  junk food/boxed meals/etc. are much cheaper than healthy ingredients (although healthy for consumers, not the chickens which this show is all about), and all those cheesecakes/fatty pies/etc. on BOGOF/'Special' Offer/Etc., give no incentive for those on limited incomes to buy/grow healthy food.

So whatever you think about HFW (and his lack of chicken catching skills - or was that just for entertainment purposes?), at least it might inspire/enpower some people to change their lifestyles.

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gobs

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« Reply #64 on: January 08, 2008, 18:56 »
I actually do not know a single single mother who is overweight... :?

On the other hand, most of them have a real hard life, and often short of time or money or both.

As for the idea of the main topic, I understand you are with good intentions and yes, if it changes even just a few people's attitude it was worthwhile.

On the other hand, I don't like hypocritical. It's so easy (and also may I add pathetic ) for the rich to go around and tell the 'not-so-well-of' that they are immoral if buying cheap food.

It might be more complex than seems and a lot of issues (marketing, trade, etc.) would need to be addressed for a successful change.
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John

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« Reply #65 on: January 08, 2008, 19:43 »
Quote from: "gobs"
I actually do not know a single single mother who is overweight... :?

On the other hand, most of them have a real hard life, and often short of time or money or both.

As for the idea of the main topic, I understand you are with good intentions and yes, if it changes even just a few people's attitude it was worthwhile.

On the other hand, I don't like hypocritical. It's so easy (and also may I add pathetic ) for the rich to go around and tell the 'not-so-well-of' that they are immoral if buying cheap food.

It might be more complex than seems and a lot of issues (marketing, trade, etc.) would need to be addressed for a successful change.


Well if we do meet an overweight single mum, we have a reason.

I agree with your other comments 100% as well -  but I still contend that education is a key. I really don't see why children (M&F) aren't taught how to cook and run a home - perhaps a 'lifeskills GCSE' or something.

Schools often used to have gardens, keep poultry and pets but now it's fallen away under health and safety fears and a drive for targets.

I also had a chat with a chap who wanted to show his local schoolkids how to grow veg. Then they had to vet him and he took great offense at being accused of being a pervert. World gone mad.
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Selkie

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« Reply #66 on: January 08, 2008, 19:49 »
Don't they teach Home Economics in school anymore?

I studied it to Leaving Cert level (similar to your A-Levels except we do loads more subjects--I took 8); it was an optional subject but most people did it.

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tallulah

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« Reply #67 on: January 08, 2008, 21:24 »
Quote from: "milliebecks"
I was a bit disappointed by the programme last night.  
I've always been a fan of HFW, but I thought he came across as rather self-indulgent and smug.  


What - a TV chef?  Surely not!

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SnooziSuzi

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« Reply #68 on: January 08, 2008, 21:36 »
I missed this last night and subsequently have only found this thread, 5 pages in!!

It would be nice if these types of shows could change peoples minds, but I think that for the most part any change of mind would only be temporary because it's easier for people who have grown up with convenience foods to just continue buying convenience items  :(

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gobs

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« Reply #69 on: January 08, 2008, 21:40 »
Quote from: "john"
Quote from: "gobs"
I actually do not know a single single mother who is overweight... :?

On the other hand, most of them have a real hard life, and often short of time or money or both.

As for the idea of the main topic, I understand you are with good intentions and yes, if it changes even just a few people's attitude it was worthwhile.

On the other hand, I don't like hypocritical. It's so easy (and also may I add pathetic ) for the rich to go around and tell the 'not-so-well-of' that they are immoral if buying cheap food.

It might be more complex than seems and a lot of issues (marketing, trade, etc.) would need to be addressed for a successful change.


Well if we do meet an overweight single mum, we have a reason.

I agree with your other comments 100% as well -  but I still contend that education is a key. I really don't see why children (M&F) aren't taught how to cook and run a home - perhaps a 'lifeskills GCSE' or something.

Schools often used to have gardens, keep poultry and pets but now it's fallen away under health and safety fears and a drive for targets.

I also had a chat with a chap who wanted to show his local schoolkids how to grow veg. Then they had to vet him and he took great offense at being accused of being a pervert. World gone mad.


Absolutely, John. Who said this: 'Education, Education, Education'? :lol:

It is well overdue, as I understand a scary percentage of children has no chance of learning those skills at home as their parents don't have any either.

I, as a left them to it teacher, seriously think, there should be less scope for topics and subjects you opt for till higher education, there should be a few compulsory subjects to at least O level, that are more numerous and varied than spelling. If for no other reason, just give them kids a decent enough scope to enable them to choose. Or to cope.

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babe

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« Reply #70 on: January 08, 2008, 21:53 »
our school still takes the littlies to a local farm to show them where their food is from. and with cows and sheep in the village they know its beef and lamb.

the little lad who lives next door only eats egg if its from one of my girls, because he doesnt know the names of the eggs in the shop.

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GrannieAnnie

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« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2008, 23:20 »
Quote from: "gobs"
It is well overdue, as I understand a scary percentage of children has no chance of learning those skills at home as their parents don't have any either.


You're so right there Gobs!  Did you see Jamies' school dinners?  Even the ladies diong the cooking in the school canteens couldn't cook simplethings like pasta  dishes.  all they ever did was chuck cheap burgers round and fry chips,  til Jamies got a grip on them!!!!

I had cookery classes when I was at senior school, and my daughters did a bit, but it was never anything useful, One of the first things I was taught to cook was curried eggs.  they were vile!  All my girls were taught was mince pies and victoria sandwich.  But I don't think many schools now do Home Economics!

I was lucky, my Dad was a brilliant pastry cook and his baking was superb.  Mum was a bit hit and miss, my brother used to say he didn't know which was lumpier, her cabbage, gravy or mashed potato.  she used to put bicarb in the cabbage water to keep the cabbage green, not realising that the bicarb took all the goodness out of the cabbage.  Gravy was Bisto powder that went lumpy if you ddin't keep stirring it, and she used to mash the potatoes with a fish slice, well chop them up actually as she didn't like the masher!!!!

But as I enjoyed cooking with Dad, I carried on myself and found cooking in school really boring.

My 2 girls didn't like cooking, one of them still doesn't, and not many of the grandchildren do either.  My youngest daughters youngest likes to do a bit with me when she's here, but her Mum worries about her cutting herself!!!!

Tonight's episode was upsetting, but as we have kept poultry on and off for sme tme, I'm probably a bit more hardened to it than some of you, but when I said to Brian about the way they throw the chicks out of the boxes, he said did I remember how they did it at the poultry show we went to once years ago?  They chuck the day olds out of the boxes into a dump truck looking thing and go through the houses laying them out the back of it like a carpet of little yellow things.

Also someone said about them being cramped into those little boxes.  That isn't cruel, some of those chicks have long journeys in front of them.  The boxes are 2ft square and hold 100 chicks.  The boxes are dividd into four compartments of 25 in each.  they are packed in reasonably tightly so they don't get knocked around in transit.  

Likewise, when you go to pick up your new  chickens, don't take a huge box for 3 chooks, take one which is just slightly larger than the amount of chooks you want, as they will just lie down once the journey starts.  Although ours did make quite a lot of noise on the way home, chirping all the way!!!!!  Then they won't get injured, especially if you have to brake suddenly!

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sweet nasturtium

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« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2008, 23:42 »
Grannie, my oh also said regarding the way the chicks get flipped out of the box - that that's the way they do it, and the best way.

He also pointed out that the way HFW was chasing the chicken he was trying to catch was inhumane, causing the animal a lot of stress - I see the irony in that but would appreciate a chicken expert's view.

As regards cooking Grannie, you're right, learning how to cook Victoria sponge at school isn't going to set children off to a good start in healthy eating.  The way Jamie Oliver involved the process of handling food and getting children involved with the basics like chopping and kneading is the most important part of it.  

A number of children I know are food phobic, some don't like the feel or smell, others have pernickety parents who have simply confused their children by going on about either the ethics or the fat content/health value of foods.  Some have problems because their parents stress about them at mealtimes.

And finally, John, getting adults to work in any way with children these days involves a CRB check, do tell your friend to not take it personally, even parents need one when helping at school.  It's really important that people like him get involved in schools, they have so much to offer.

My dds have, through school, had only a couple of experiences of the countryside, a trip to a dairy farm when they were 4 and couldn't understand what was going on, and a trip to a teacher's allotment which they loved.  They also went on a trip to make pizza dough at a restaurant.  These trips are extremely important to city children.  My best friend at school thought mountains were made by people until we went on a geography field trip!  She'd never actually seen a real one before then, we were 14!

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GrannieAnnie

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« Reply #73 on: January 08, 2008, 23:50 »
Your OH is right about him stressing the chicken the way he was running after it.  Poor little thing!  You won't catch anything like that!  They can run fast can't they?  lol  I sometimes miss them, but when I'm catching them I crouch down as much as I can so I don't tower over them too much and gradually close them into a corner, with both arms out.  Slowly, slowly, get nearer and nearer, then, hopefully, whichever way they run, there's a hand to grab them.  But I'm not as quick on my feet as I used to be!!!!! lol

I pick them up with their wings tucked into their sides so they don't hurt themselves, but you are supposed to hold them under their breasts with your hand spread out so they lay in your palm with their legs dangling each side of your hand.  I'm not good at explaining, but Bodger will know as I believe that's how they do it when they show birds.  They are supposed not to move when you hold them like that, facing towards you, but mine do!

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John

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« Reply #74 on: January 09, 2008, 00:31 »
I reckon the running around bit was to emphasise his birds being free range. I was pleased to see the lady who stuck to her opinion that 'they were going to be eaten anyway'  wasn't edited out.

I think this is the most honest programme HFW has made - his tears were real. I don't think it's the killing of the bird that got to him as much as the waste.  I'm afraid this is an uphill battle.

I liked the bit about labelling as well. My pet peeve is "Farm Fresh Eggs"  The image is of the countryside, just laid. The truth is different.  

I've been in a battery egg unit some years back when I sold labels. They are terrifying. I've not been so scared since my Grandad took me to the mine where he worked.

The noise was deafening, the stench made my eyes water and it was a vision of hell. Belsen for birds.

We really, really shouldn't be so callous.


 

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