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Author Topic: Raspberry runners  (Read 1010 times)

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Rich72

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  • Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire
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Raspberry runners
« on: August 04, 2011, 09:47 »
What do I do with raspberry runners? I started off with 5 canes which started shooting approximately 2ft up. But then loads of runners emerged from the soil, some have fruited so not overly concerned but the biggest one is now as tall as the original cane


mumofstig

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Re: Raspberry runners
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2011, 09:56 »
This is how they grow ;)
Each year after fruiting you cut of the cane that has fruited that year. The new canes will fruit next year.
Lesley  
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I'm not good, I'm not bad, I'm just me - and sometimes I have to apologise for that!

Rich72

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  • Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire
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Re: Raspberry runners
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2011, 10:00 »
Oh. Didnt know that. Thanks

Trillium

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Re: Raspberry runners
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2011, 14:28 »
The only problem with runners is that you need to keep them under control, otherwise, they'll be growing in your paths and soon more of a nuisance.

Whatever runners sneak into your path, either chop them out or transplant them back into the row proper. Trust me, you don't want your patch to turn into a jungle. Been there, done that, and it's no fun.

JayG

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Re: Raspberry runners
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2011, 16:21 »
If, like me, you just haven't got any free sideways space for the row of raspberries to spread into you can make a vertical barrier about 18" deep and about the same distance from the row to stop them escaping.

I used a double layer of pond liner which I had spare, but corrugated plastic sheeting might be easier to install (although harder to cut.)

So far it's working well, although only on one side as there's a path nearby on the other side and what Trillium says is very true!
Sow your seeds, plant your plants, and plonk your potatoes in the soil.



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