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Author Topic: welsh onions  (Read 16074 times)

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muddifoot

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welsh onions
« on: June 04, 2008, 09:34 »
i planted 2 welsh onions in my herb bed that are beautiful but are now going to seed-  at first i thought i won't use them because they are such lovely things - now i want more to grow - and to use.  I bought them as herbs -now i just wonder if anyone grows them  as a proper crop of onions and how do i get more-  remember I'm a novice at this gardening game that is why i ask such stupid questions--

gardener of four months and loving it.


dereklane

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welsh onions
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2008, 10:29 »
Leave them alone, they grow out in a clump. Every year or two, just pull them up divide, and replant. You can use them just like spring onions (but they're smaller).

You'll be giving them away in a year or two:)

cheers,

Derek

garddwr bach

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welsh onions
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2008, 14:49 »
If you let them mature, doesn't the flower tip change into tiny onions  - which you can then plant??
I has some years go and that's what someone called them.
Try to be organic but will use black fly killer and a few slug pellets if desperate.

dereklane

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welsh onions
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2008, 14:53 »
They may do - my neighbours plant leek 'pips' once they're about 3-4 inches long for next years leeks, which results in stronger (and easier) leeks than from seed (I've started from last year myself, so we'll see).

But it's easier on welsh onions to divide the plant, they're such enthusiastic growers.

cheers,

Trillium

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welsh onions
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2008, 14:59 »
The onions that have tiny onions on the 'seed head' are usually called walking onions, tree onions or Egyptian onions. They differ from the Welsh which put out actual seeds.

gobs

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welsh onions
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2008, 16:36 »
Welsh onions grow rather sizeable and also strong enough to cook with - mine do anyhow, only am growing one type - , plant up individually about a foot apart. Harvest when you have about 6 or so, by putting back as many as you want, individually.

There are 2 very different types: non-flowering, division only, often referred to as perennial or everlasting Welsh onion and the flowering ones, often referred to as 'annual' - not true - Welsh onion. This latter one can be propagated both ways, however, deteriorates with age and needs re-sowing at least every few years, hence the name, the common way of cultivation.
"Words... I know exactly what words I'm wanting to say, but somehow or other they is always getting squiff-squiddled around." R Dahl

corndolly

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welsh onions
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2008, 20:43 »
we had welsh onions for years , untill the area where they grew was redeveloped and they were nt saved for posterity. i miss them as they were a very handy veg ,to replace either cooking onion or spring onion.

so where do i go to get some new stock.

Like chives they needed very little assistance once established.
Growing organic fruit and vegetables

Elaine G

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welsh onions
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2008, 20:50 »
Ok,I feel a bit daft asking as you all seem to know, but what are Welsh onions?  I've only ever seen onions and shallots.
Do you buy them as sets?
They certainly sound good.

Elaine
The foolish man seeks happiness in the distance, the wise grows it under his feet - James Oppenheim

gobs

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welsh onions
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2008, 22:13 »
Quote from: "Elaine G"
Ok,I feel a bit daft asking as you all seem to know, but what are Welsh onions?  I've only ever seen onions and shallots.
Do you buy them as sets?
They certainly sound good.

Elaine


They are pretty much like Japanese bunching onions, the very same things, historically, just developed in several different directions.

I didn't buy any, there is some on most lotty sites here and they just go around as an infection of a very good kind. :lol:

Try Jekka's herb farm, if nothing around you, you really want to track down a  forever type, without seed, if you can.

If no joy , I can send you some. :wink:

dereklane

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welsh onions
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2008, 22:13 »
Quote
The onions that have tiny onions on the 'seed head' are usually called walking onions, tree onions or Egyptian onions. They differ from the Welsh which put out actual seeds.


I read it that they meant you get a ball shaped head with lots of medusa like green hair (onions) radiating out from it, which you can separate, root and then plant as onions (which you definitely *can* do with leeks).

My welsh onions  must be the 'not true' ones, because I get the flowers, but its definitely easy to divide them. But, the bloke I got them from has been using his for the last 20+ years, all from the original plants, always just by division, so it seems you can divide them more or less indefinitely...

Elaine G, welsh onions are like chives in stature, where you can use them like spring onion (harvesting down to the bulb). But, they're much hardier, will easily stand through winter, and just keep going.

cheers,

Derek

peterjf

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welsh onions
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2008, 22:27 »
hi there ,we have some 40+ welsh onions , thios year we divided theminto little groups of 5 , by next year we should have at least doubled in number , if anything you should feed them with a little 1/2 strength tomato feed, leave them alone and they will multiply , they are a lot stronger then spring onions , nip a small piece off anf chew the leaf

gobs

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welsh onions
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2008, 22:32 »
Quote from: "dereklane"
Quote
The onions that have tiny onions on the 'seed head' are usually called walking onions, tree onions or Egyptian onions. They differ from the Welsh which put out actual seeds.


I read it that they meant you get a ball shaped head with lots of medusa like green hair (onions) radiating out from it, which you can separate, root and then plant as onions (which you definitely *can* do with leeks).

My welsh onions  must be the 'not true' ones, because I get the flowers, but its definitely easy to divide them. But, the bloke I got them from has been using his for the last 20+ years, all from the original plants, always just by division, so it seems you can divide them more or less indefinitely...

Elaine G, welsh onions are like chives in stature, where you can use them like spring onion (harvesting down to the bulb). But, they're much hardier, will easily stand through winter, and just keep going.

cheers,

Derek


Derek, I think, you are confusing them. The tree onions, Trillium mentioned, that grow the onion on top, are a cross of Welsh onion with some other, not Welsh onion proper at all.

By not true I meant that they were annuals not being true, they are not. Just that they deteriorate to look like chives with time.

Even the everlasting onion does, if not cultivated properly. :wink:

dereklane

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welsh onions
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2008, 22:38 »
Hi Gobs,

yes, I know the tree onions, but I was referring to the comment made by garddwr bach to which I replied to and trillium then replied to. I thought garddwr bach was suggesting that welsh onions might get 'pips' (like leeks, for growing on) though I haven't seen it.

Then after reading your post, I figured I must have the type of flowering welsh onion, because, well, it flowers.

So, now I'm confused... what is it that I am confusing?

cheers,

gobs

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welsh onions
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2008, 06:35 »
Quote from: "dereklane"
Hi Gobs,

yes, I know the tree onions, but I was referring to the comment made by garddwr bach to which I replied to and trillium then replied to. I thought garddwr bach was suggesting that welsh onions might get 'pips' (like leeks, for growing on) though I haven't seen it.

Then after reading your post, I figured I must have the type of flowering welsh onion, because, well, it flowers.

So, now I'm confused... what is it that I am confusing?

cheers,


I don't know, what we are talking about. Might be my misunderstanding. :?

Leeks have round flower heads, with proper seed in , pretty much like onion, the both of those. The little plants that can be planted up form on the base of the plant as tiny divisions and already have roots, like with all sorts of bunch forming allium.

Medusa like green things on one of my ornamental onions, called Hair, these are part of the flower, neither seed or plant.

muddifoot

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welsh onions
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2008, 07:59 »
now i'm terribly confused- the ones that i bought and put in my herb garden are starting to get a ball on top- if they multiply I will have to remove them as my herb garden is quite small 4x4  (yes silly size)   so when should i move it?  ah yes-  us greenhorns need constant advice and thank god for this allotment site or we would be in deep trouble..

thanks everybody



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