Clubroot

  • 3 Replies
  • 3372 Views
*

sontab

  • New Member
  • *
  • Location: Derbyshire
  • 24
Clubroot
« on: March 28, 2006, 10:38 »
Have tried searching this topic without success so here goes.

Does anybody know of any tried and tested way of dealing with clubroot as chemicals are no longer available?  I know of lime and about rotation of crops so it is anything else that somebody may have found of help.

Have a feeling that the plot was used just for the growing of onions for many, many years, will this have affected the land?

Any help would be gratefully received.

Sonia:(

*

John

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • 13396
    • Low Cost Living
Clubroot
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2006, 10:50 »
Clubroot - oh dear.
This came up at an NVS meeting and the view seemed to be that you need to bring your brassicas along as far as possible in pots. Maybe 9" pots before transplanting. Also dig out a hole before planting and fill with clean compost.

Since it  remains in the ground for years, you just have to learn to live with it as far as I can tell. Sorry, no magic bullets.

As for the onion plot - it was quite common to use one bed for onions. The problem with this is that all crops use different proportions of nutrients and so the soil becomes out of balance. Also pest / disease build up.

It's probably fine to grow anything but onion family (onions, leeks, garlic) on the plot for a year or two to let things get back into balance.
Check out our books - ideal presents

John and Val Harrison's Books
 

*

dave

  • New Member
  • *
  • Location: crewe
  • 17
Clubroot
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2006, 18:31 »
two other things you can do
1 put a bit of rhubarb under the plants when planting out; don't know scientific justification but on basis of last year seems to improve my results, in conjunction with

2 lime/ground limestone/dolomite
I mixed a bit of ground limestone in with the compost in the pots, and then chucked a bit in the planting hole and round about

clubroot only got 2 or 3 plants out of about 40

dave

*

John

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • 13396
    • Low Cost Living
Clubroot
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2006, 19:20 »
There was a study by the HDRA on various remedies for clubroot including rhubarb. They didn't find any benefit to rhubarb, unfortunately. Or anthing else in the old gardeners armoury.

pH values approching neutral do seem to benefit - possibly because brassicas do well at high pH rather than anything else. There were some chemical controls, but I think they've been banned under new chemical regulations.


 

Page created in 0.04 seconds with 34 queries.

Powered by SMFPacks SEO Pro Mod |