beans

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rowlandwells

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beans
« on: September 20, 2018, 17:46 »
what beans  did you grow this year did you grow runner beans- climbing French beans -or dwarf French beans do you favour stringless runner beans or perhaps you have gone with climbing French bean or do you grow Dwarf French bean

I'm asking this Q.  because it seemed like quite a few people like us where growing climbing French beans this season than runner we grew Cobra  [climbing French] and had very good results despite the weather not watered but  the runners suffered with no water had some but not a great crop [stringless] scarlet empire


also did you grow broad beans we did the varieties we grew where imperial green long pod and imperial green windsor not a great crop as we usually get i put that down to the weather



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AnneB

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Re: beans
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2018, 23:10 »
I went a bit overboard with beans this year.  They all did well, but I watered and watered and watered.  I grow Wizard field beans rather than broad beans.  They weren't as good as normal, I put that down to the harsh late winter/ spring stunting normal growth.  Still got a decent crop though. The rest were all great.

Runner beans:   Black Knight.  Still flowering!  Not stringy unless large
Climbing French Beans:   
Cobra - got going early. Big crop, stringless
Carmalat
Cherokee Trail of Tears
Veitch's Climbing Bean
Cosse Violette
Kentucky Wonder Wax - a lovely climbing yellow bean, completely stringless
Lazy Housewife
Snowcap - a very pretty bi-colour deep red and cream bean, very productive
Cara la Virgen de la Baneza Leon - late cropping and very tall, still waiting for the seed to form
Borlotti - only does well in good summers - so a good year for these.

The last 4 on the list were grown for dried beans to use in soups and stews in winter.

Dwarf French Bean: Hutterite Soup Bean (again for dried beans).

The freezers are full and people turn and run in the other direction when they see me coming towards them now!!


                                       
« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 08:05 by AnneB »

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DHM

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Re: beans
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2018, 06:30 »
Getting our plot quite late I only mananged to bung in 7 dwarf french bean plants but they've been suprisingly prolific, a scant half carrier bag per week and still going strong now.

Next year however I've dedicated an 10x11ft bed to beans so it will be bean central! Here's the plan:

Dwarf Kidney - Canadian Wonder
Dwarf Flageolet - Flagrano
Climbing Runner - Polestar
Climbing Broad - Bunyards Exhibition
Climbing Borlotti - Lingua di Fuoco
Climbing French - Blauhilde
Peas - Alderman
Mangetout - Oregon Sugar Pod
Magic Bean - Jacks Ladder

I was joking about the last one...!

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AnneB

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Re: beans
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2018, 08:09 »
Getting our plot quite late I only mananged to bung in 7 dwarf french bean plants but they've been suprisingly prolific, a scant half carrier bag per week and still going strong now.

Next year however I've dedicated an 10x11ft bed to beans so it will be bean central! Here's the plan:

Dwarf Kidney - Canadian Wonder
Dwarf Flageolet - Flagrano
Climbing Runner - Polestar
Climbing Broad - Bunyards Exhibition
Climbing Borlotti - Lingua di Fuoco
Climbing French - Blauhilde
Peas - Alderman
Mangetout - Oregon Sugar Pod
Magic Bean - Jacks Ladder

I was joking about the last one...!
I wouldn't describe the broad beans as climbing.  They get to about 4ft or so, but won't twine round a pole like climbing french beans.   I would grow them separately in a block myself.

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rowlandwells

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Re: beans
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 08:50 »
well I must admit there are many varieties I don't know of but I'm going to find out more about these varieties and possibly give them a try next year

thank all

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DHM

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Re: beans
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 16:07 »
Getting our plot quite late I only mananged to bung in 7 dwarf french bean plants but they've been suprisingly prolific, a scant half carrier bag per week and still going strong now.

Next year however I've dedicated an 10x11ft bed to beans so it will be bean central! Here's the plan:

Dwarf Kidney - Canadian Wonder
Dwarf Flageolet - Flagrano
Climbing Runner - Polestar
Climbing Broad - Bunyards Exhibition
Climbing Borlotti - Lingua di Fuoco
Climbing French - Blauhilde
Peas - Alderman
Mangetout - Oregon Sugar Pod
Magic Bean - Jacks Ladder

I was joking about the last one...!
I wouldn't describe the broad beans as climbing.  They get to about 4ft or so, but won't twine round a pole like climbing french beans.   I would grow them separately in a block myself.

Ooh I didn't know that. If i still grow them up the side of the 'cane tent' but add netting to tie the stems to would that work or are they just bushy?

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Christine

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Re: beans
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2018, 20:21 »
So far as I know after about 10 years growing broad beans - they are bushy no matter what variety of broad bean you grow.

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DHM

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Re: beans
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2018, 20:24 »
So far as I know after about 10 years growing broad beans - they are bushy no matter what variety of broad bean you grow.

I'll take your word for it, Ive never grown these before. Back to the plans!!  What stops them just flopping over then, or dont they?

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AnneB

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Re: beans
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2018, 21:42 »
My preferred method for broad beans is to plant them in a block with about 8" each way between plants.  Put a tall post or stout cane at each corner and as the beans grow wrap twine around the outside of the posts to support the beans.

My own preference is to grow Wizard Field Beans rather than standard broad beans. Taste the same. Higher yield. Tougher. Less prone to pests. But I grow them the same way.

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lettice

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Re: beans
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2018, 10:47 »
I grow these;

Runner beans - Painted lady - Been saving the seed for decades. Excellent crop as ever this year.
French Cobra beans (Seekay originally now saved) - Excellent croppers. Bucket loads of them each week this year as they normally do.
Purple Queen French Beans - cropped well this year as ever in my usual pots. My saved seeds.
Sonesta beans - Dwarf grown in pots, cropped as well as previous years. My saved seeds.
Hunter beans - (Mr Fothergills) Great crop of flat beans in ground and this year in pots, great croppers.

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bayleaf

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Re: beans
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2018, 21:14 »
I grew The Sutton broad beans as our site is quite exposed and they did well this year. I was late starting so never got the runner beans in as I was away for two weeks holiday when they should have been done. My dwarf French beans (Sprite) are still going strong. I have grown Cobra before and they are very prolific.

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MustbeMad

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Re: beans
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2018, 12:59 »
Great crop of climbing french beans this year which was Trail of Tears. I have never had any luck with Cobra outside - too far north I guess.

Runners (mixed) were not good at all, probably one or two beans for every 20 flowers - too dry?

It was the other way around last year, all the remaining ones will be used as dry beans if I can persuade the wife that beans are edible like this and good for you :D

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AnneB

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Re: beans
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2018, 13:19 »
Great crop of climbing french beans this year which was Trail of Tears. I have never had any luck with Cobra outside - too far north I guess.

Runners (mixed) were not good at all, probably one or two beans for every 20 flowers - too dry?

It was the other way around last year, all the remaining ones will be used as dry beans if I can persuade the wife that beans are edible like this and good for you :D
Surprised you have had no success with Cobra, even in Northumberland.  Our site is high up and windy on the edge of Bradford and Cobra have been excellent.  I have a friend who grows them on his site just outside Skipton, which again, is high up and exposed on a hillside, but they all grow Cobra very well there.

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Growster...

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Re: beans
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2018, 14:50 »
I was about to grub up our 'Cherokee trail of tears' beans a day ago, and noticed them flowering again! We've had a great clop already!

Loads of beans appearing, but sadly, not for us, as we're giving up our allotment!

Lucky newcomers!



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