cumberland rum

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chrissie B

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cumberland rum
« on: January 22, 2017, 16:49 »
Nicky , going to be making one next weekend using a paul holliwood recipe , i thought i would do one of these as i have a bit of mincemeat left home made looking at his recipe he is using dates i dont suppose the mince meat will alter it to much as its mainly dates also i was wondering why its called nicky ?
chrissie b
Woman cannot live by bread alone , she must have cake , biscuits cheese and the occasional glass of wine .🍷

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mumofstig

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Re: cumberland rum
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2017, 17:23 »
BBC website says
Quote
‘Nicky’ may stem from the original technique of covering the filling with a whole piece of pastry then making slashes or ‘nicks’ in it.

I think the mincemeat will alter the taste quite a bit, but it'll still be good  :D
Lesley x
I'm not good, I'm not bad - I'm just me, and sometimes I have to apologise for that ;)

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chrissie B

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Re: cumberland rum
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2017, 13:10 »
Dont have a massive ammount left but not enough to make any thing with and its all been soaking in rum should be tasty.
chrissie b

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Felicity A

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Re: cumberland rum
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2017, 11:43 »
This is one of the oldest traditional Cumberland desserts dating back to the East Indies trading routes. During this time Whitehaven was the second biggest port in England, bringing products like ginger, dates, rum, molasses and spices to Britain. The canny Cumbrian seamen were given a bonus by the ship owners of some of the items they were carrying. This led them to invent a date, rum and ginger flan called Rum Nicky. It is assumed that the word nicky derives from the fact that the shortage of ingredients to complete the flan were often ‘nicked’ (stolen) from the ship.

 

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