The best rose

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Grubbypaws

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The best rose
« on: August 22, 2015, 15:55 »
I want to grow a rose up my gritstone house wall next to the front door but the conditions are tough; dry south facing clay! It will need to be disease resistant and hardy. The feel of the garden is wildlife friendly, cottagey and organic. There was a rose there before but it got black spot and eventually died, probably of old age. There has been a container with a clematis there for several years since so I am hoping that I am good to replant another rose.

Has anyone any suggestions?

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bendipa

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2015, 17:07 »
There's no such thing as a 'disease resistant' rose despite the claims by breeders. Some varieties are less prone to diseases like black-spot than other ones, but you should still use a regular spraying program.

There are some great climbing roses with good disease resistance to choose from. I would recommend:-

Compassion (peach pink)which has a fine scent. Grows to 12' - 13' once mature.
Danse de Feu (crimson). Grows to 12'.
Gardener's Glory (Rich yellow) Good scent.  The shortest climber in my list growing 10' high.
Mme Alfred Carriere (White/pale pink), strong scent. This is the biggest climber on my list that can grow over 15' tall if you let it.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2015, 17:22 by bendipa »

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Goosegirl

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2015, 10:34 »
How high do you want it to grow as some roses can be trained as climbers, one of which is the beautiful and strong-scented deep pink Gertrude Jekyll which can grow to 6ft or possibly more.
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Grubbypaws

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 16:51 »
Thank you Goosegirl it looks gorgeous. I have changed my plan a little as I think the conditions are such that a rose there is not the best idea. However I have a NW facing wall next to a door where the soil is much better and it isn't as bone dry. I was toying with Constance Spry but worrying about it not being full sun. Gertrude Jekyll is 'More tolerant of shade than many other roses, it should still flower well with around 4 - 5 hours of direct sun every day'. Perfect  :D

By the front south facing door I am successfully growing Verbena bonariensis with ‘Rudbeckia fulgida var. deamii’ on one side. The combination looks great and i am now thinking of doing something similar on the other side instead of the rose idea. I cant decide whether to match the combination exactly or contrast it with Verbena bonariensis paired with Echinacea purpurea Magnus  :unsure:

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Goosegirl

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2015, 10:42 »
I'm glad you like the suggestion and was going to say that you would need to improve the soil there with sharp sand and compost for it to succeed. If your Verbena and Rudbeckia are growing well there, I'd plant the same on the other side as the conditions obviously suit them and something different might look out of balance. Have you room for all three on both sides?

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Grubbypaws

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2015, 11:48 »
That is the decision I have come to as well. The space is smaller so only room 2 species. I might place the Echinacea purpurea at a distance but in a site line with the verbena if that makes sense. I am slightly worried about the size of the flowers tho; 10 cm across is large so it might not work visually. I might buy one plant and move it around the garden so see if it adds. If it doesnt I could alwayds pop it in a container and put it in my wee allotment to keep the bees happy  :D

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Grubbypaws

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2015, 16:31 »
Gertrude Jekyll  is planted  :D

Has anyone got any good information on how I train it against my wall? Having a quick look on the internet it seems that it is important to do it right but I am a little confused.

Also

I followed the instruction that came with it and planted it with the bud union at soil level. Having now watched some more videos it would seem that I should have planted it with the bud union below the soil level. Are there any experts out there who know if this matters or not.

Thank you

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Flowertot

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2015, 22:49 »
A beautiful rose  :). David Austin is the rose guru and he says it should be just below. Have a look at his website - the planting guide has clear photos.

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Goosegirl

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2015, 11:35 »
Just looking at my rose books from RHS and John Scarman. Modern roses around in 1920's were weaker than their understock so were planted with the bud union at the soil surface - think GJ may fall into this category. For training climbers against a wall, get your supports onto which you will train the branches firmly fixed in place. Aim to create a fan shape by tying the branches that come out of the main ones in sequence as they are produced so as to avoid them crossing, and they will produce flowers lower down because if you let them grow upright, you'll just get flowers at the top. Put some canes into the soil in a fan shape. New shoots are quite pliable so gently bend the lower ones as they appear and as near horizontal as you can and tie them in, then do the same with the next ones coming further up (but don't tie quite as low down) to make your fan shape. Tie new shoots to the canes or frame with twine which has been twisted twice around the supports then knotted onto it so it doesn't move, then tie in the shoot to that. Later on, remove any short twiggy growth from the base to encourage taller growth. He also says to allow the forward-facing shoots to grow longer at the bottom like you would do when battening a hedge because it thickens the basal growth, and also to remove the tip of any long upward shoots that have no branches coming off to encourage them to branch later on. In autumn, shorten any long whippy growth so it doesn't break off in the winds. That should do for now.

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mumofstig

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Re: The best rose
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2015, 11:58 »
Lesley x
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