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Author Topic: Allotment equipment  (Read 4984 times)

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chicken soup

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Allotment equipment
« on: January 17, 2008, 13:14 »
As I have previously stated on other threads we don't actually get our allotment until the begining of March but I was wondering what you all thought was the basic equipment I would need at the allotment.  I have spades, forks etc at home but obviously as I can't drive will be buying extra for the allotment.
40 hens, 8 cockerels, 3 dogs, 2 rabbits, 8 chinchillas, 2 teenage daughters and O/H


DD.

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2008, 13:54 »
This previous thread should help...

Tools For Starting Out

There may be others people would like to add.
I can't believe it told you to do that on the seed packet!

Celtic Eagle

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2008, 14:30 »
Hiya Chicken

Spade
Fork
Rake
Hoe
Trowel
Hand fork
Buckets

That's about it really, I can see the logic in what you are doing I have done the same thing but be wary of things walking.  I would buy tools secondhand of Carboots and not leave anything you wouldn't want to lose.

I take my home based tools when I need them other than that they stay in the shed at home

Sorry if that sounds overcautious but stuff does go walk about on our site.
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Celtic Eagle

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Lynne

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2008, 15:26 »
Celtic Eagle is right about not keeping anything valuable there. The only other thing I would add (if your allotment is badly overgrown with nettle/bramble roots) is a pick axe. It really helps to break the surface up, making it easier to dig.

I think someone has already mentioned azada, they are great too, but a pick axe will go deeper.
Lynne.

So much to do, but so little time.

chicken soup

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2008, 15:49 »
Thanks for reminding me that garden tools go for a walk.  I am off to an auction tomorrow so never know what might turn up.  :)   I probably need more than one fork and spade though as I can see hubby sitting back watching me do all the work.  He unfortunately isnt the best gardener in the world and is well known for pulling up flowers in the garden and leaving the weeds.  :x

My allotment is going to be a brand new one at the back of our local garden centre and they have said it will all be ploughed over before we get there in March so hopefully the soil will be easier to dig.

I have been thinking this afternoon about what I would need and come up with wheelbarrow, gloves and a bucket as although they have  a shared water supply on site it is metered and some how I can see some allotment holders being more extravagant than others.  I might just use the water out of the reservior which the owners said would be ok and is free.  Which reminds me a watering can might be good.  

I think I better start a list on my computer I can see this becoming a never ending list.  :D

flash

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2008, 17:40 »
I've used my wheelbarrow every day. Absolutely essential if you have to clear your plot and move horse poo. My plot is up a grassy hill so currently it's like a game featured in it's a knockout, but involving a lot of mud.

Trillium

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2008, 20:10 »
If you have to walk to the plot, chicken soup, then an old golf cart would be ideal to carry the tools in and hook the water can off one side.
I add to the others who recommend you not leave tools, least of all new tools, at the allotments. Too many break-ins, mostly destructive pranksters.

cawdor2001

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2008, 22:18 »
watering can essential.  I got 2 today from The range, 3.49 each for a 10 litre can with rose which i thought was pretty good.  I know what you are saying re tools but you cannot possibly take home and bring back each time all your tools eg. fork, spade, rake, hoe to name a few things.  Think you have to buy cheap and take the hit if they get nicked and replace cheap if risk is high.  No point having a shed if you ain't gonna use it.

Cawdor
Used to be indecisive, now i'm not so sure...

chicken soup

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Allotment equipment
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2008, 13:31 »
Quote from: "cawdor2001"
I know what you are saying re tools but you cannot possibly take home and bring back each time all your tools eg. fork, spade, rake, hoe to name a few things.  Think you have to buy cheap and take the hit if they get nicked and replace cheap if risk is high.  No point having a shed if you ain't gonna use it. Cawdor


I am planning on buying or acquiring (freecycle, auctions etc) a cheap set of tools that although would be annoying to say the least if they went for walk wouldn't be the end of the world.  If hubby goes to allotment then we would have to take extras with us from home which wouldn't be a problem as he can drive then take them home again.  If I didn't take an extra fork, spade etc he would have an excuse to just sit and watch me do all the work.  :(



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