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Author Topic: Turks Turban  (Read 1165 times)

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J_B

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Turks Turban
« on: October 08, 2013, 23:51 »
Every year i try and grow something that i have grown previously, this year while browsing through my localfarm shop came across a squash plant going @ 50p on a special....it had a label called Turks turban squash....had not heard of it before so decided to try it out.....easy to grow end result some great looking squash....one was made into some great soup yday...so what have you grown new thi syear....would like to know and even better if you can share photos
turks turban.JPG


allotmentann

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2013, 07:24 »
Turks Turban are pretty spectacular aren't they? I grew several varieties of courgette and squash that I have not grown before, unfortunately the miserable weather early in the year meant that I lost plants and they got moved around and the labels all lost and muddled. So although I have had a good harvest, I have no idea what I have grown!
I grew two new varieties of climbing beans, Cherokee Trail of Tears (a very old bean), that was good, but the other variety I grew was really disappointing, and I can't remember what variety that was either!
Lesson for next year - better labelling!  :)

dugless

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2013, 07:39 »
Turks Turban are pretty spectacular aren't they? I grew several varieties of courgette and squash that I have not grown before, unfortunately the miserable weather early in the year meant that I lost plants and they got moved around and the labels all lost and muddled. So although I have had a good harvest, I have no idea what I have grown!
I grew two new varieties of climbing beans, Cherokee Trail of Tears (a very old bean), that was good, but the other variety I grew was really disappointing, and I can't remember what variety that was either!
Lesson for next year - better labelling!  :)
Me too I think I will remember what the were and what I had done ::) but I forget :ohmy:
will need to keep a record of every thing, there is no excuse for not doing it but I just forget to do it. :(
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compostqueen

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2013, 08:29 »
I grew them once but they are not great in the eating stakes.   I don't bother with them now, as there are many more varieties which are as beautiful and edible  :tongue2:

mumofstig

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2013, 08:37 »
I grew them once but they are not great in the eating stakes.   I don't bother with them now, as there are many more varieties which are as beautiful and edible  :tongue2:
I'd agree with that, but sometimes i grow them for winter decorations, cos the are such lovely shapes and colours  :)

If you thought Turks Turban tasted good - then wait til you try some of the others  :D
Lesley  
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J_B

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2013, 08:56 »
so please give me ideas for squash that look pretty andd taste nice as well...

Yana

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2013, 08:57 »
I grew them once but they are not great in the eating stakes.   I don't bother with them now, as there are many more varieties which are as beautiful and edible  :tongue2:
I'd agree with that, but sometimes i grow them for winter decorations, cos the are such lovely shapes and colours  :)

If you thought Turks Turban tasted good - then wait til you try some of the others  :D
I've grown Turks turban for the first time this year and was amazed at the harvest I got. Preparing them is tricky but the taste is lovely in curries and stews and I've got a fair few for storage and use over the winter months.

What others should I try MoS?
I have my own cement mixer and not afraid to use it!!

mumofstig

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2013, 09:18 »
I rarely grow big squashes because there's only me to feed.
The High-sugar range which includes Celebration, Harlequin, Festival and Sweet Lightning ( all have similar markings and I find it hard to tell the difference between them  :D). They are all small, fruitful, pretty and lush, hard to beat for taste IMO  :)

Uchiki Kuri is also another good one.

The trombone squash Tromba d'Albegna can be used small like a courgette in summer, but if you leave them to mature, after storage they become much sweeter, with quite a firm texture. It has an 'interesting' shape rather than look pretty though. I like these more each year I've grown them up a tripod with sweetpeas.

Last year wasn't good but this was my harvest


Thelma Sanders is the pretty cream one, it's the most reliable and prolific of the ones I grow but is less sweet than the others.

« Last Edit: October 09, 2013, 09:48 by mumofstig »

Yana

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2013, 09:23 »
I rarely grow big squashes because there's only me to feed.
The High-sugar range which includes Celebration, Harlequin, Festival and Sweet Lightning ( all have similar markings and I find it hard to tell the difference between them  :D). They are all small, fruitful, pretty and lush, hard to beat for taste IMO  :)

Uchiki Kuri is also another good one.

The trombone squash Tromba d'Albegna can be used small like a courgette in summer, but if you leave them to mature, after storage they become much sweeter, with quite a firm texture. It has an 'interesting' shape rather than look pretty though. I like these more each year I've grown them up a tripod with sweetpeas.
I've jotted those names down so will give them a try next year.
Thanks  :D

BabbyAnn

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2013, 10:02 »
Despite amazing summer weather this year, I have not got as many fruits from my various winter squashes than I would have expected.  The first flush of fruit set was good but thereafter despite loads of flowers, I think I only ended up with one fruit per plant - but good sized ones so not all bad.

Any road, Potimarron (a lot like Uchiki Kuri/Red Kuri but slightly bigger) is my favourite, followed by the high sugar ones MoS mentioned.  This year I've grown lots of new ones for me - Blue kuri, Blue Hubbard, Green Hubbard, Galeux d'Eysine, Buckskin and Australian Butter so I'm looking forward to trying them out  :D

sunshineband

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2013, 10:07 »
Winter Festival are small and tasty, as are Harlequin. Prolific too  :D
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Aidy

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2013, 12:02 »
I have grown two new vege's this year.

The first is a new squash for me based on the report from the RHS... Sweet Dumpling.


And the second new veg is Scorzonera.
Always fancied this and it has been really good.

Punk isn't dead...it's underground where it belongs. If it comes to the surface it's no longer punk...it's Green Day!


chillimummy

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2013, 12:30 »
I have some seeds for sweet dumpling so will try them next year. Had no space this year. They look really nice. Tried turks turban but a few of them rotted before had chance to lift them off the ground.Only had one in the end! 
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J_B

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2013, 13:44 »
ok just went out to Wyvale n bought the following packs at 50p...lets see how they fare...outdoor Wonder gala melon,ogen melon,pepito melon,bardot melon...alsong with teh saved turks turban will be good fun next year...oo i also grew a nice khol rabi for t first time as well as purple mangetout....

Flowertot

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Re: Turks Turban
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2013, 22:41 »
I grew sweet dumpling last year and although it looked very pretty, I found it tasteless and didn't grow it this year.  I am wondering if I should try it again (I have some seeds left) as it might have been my fault it was tasteless  ::) (although it was definitely ripe).  Does it fall into the "supersweet category" or would I be better off trying one of the ones MOS listed?



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