Problem with bread.

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Mrs Bee

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2013, 12:25 »
Hi Tony. Spelt is a wheat like grain and the flour tastes rather like wholemeal flour.

It is a grain that has been around for a very long time. There is evidence of spelt grains in Ancient Egyptian and Neolithic civilisations.

It is experiencing a bit of a revival at the moment in the realms of the health food shops.

I think I have seen it in Waitrose too.

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2013, 13:08 »
I think I've seen it in Tesco too.  Must try it one day.  So would you make spelt bread like wholemeal then?

And what about opinions on rye flour please??

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Trillium

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2013, 14:16 »
Spelt is an excellent substitute for people with wheat sensitivities. However, pure spelt makes a very heavy loaf so it either needs to be mixed with another suitable flour (even some wheat if it's not too bad a problem for you) or you use a 'light' spelt that can be used on its own. Not sure what the light spelt contains but I can buy it as such here. For pure spelt, you'd need a 50/50 mix of spelt and wheat.

A lot of rye flours are quite heavy as well and need to be mixed with some wheat flour, usually an all purpose type. If you check store rye bread labels, most will have some portion of wheat flour in them, some even start with wheat flour with a bit of rye. Rye is very good for people with wheat sensitivities but do be careful how much wheat flour you blend in. Rye can even be used in sourdoughs.

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compostqueen

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2013, 15:24 »
I make spelt loaves with just spelt and no other flour and they come out well I have to say.  I make a spelt and olive loaf and one using walnuts, figs and orange juice. 

Rye is a grey flour and I've not used it on its own as it's quite heavy.   Northern Europeans would probably disagree as I think they seem to be most keen on it. 

I've got a rye starter on the go at the moment

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GrannieAnnie

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #19 on: March 15, 2013, 16:27 »
Thanks girls.  May have an experiment!   :) :)

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Trillium

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2013, 01:43 »
It's very possible that spelt flour in the UK is already 'lightened' so it can be used as is.

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mumofstig

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2013, 09:35 »
We can get wholemeal or white spelt four here, now, I wonder if that's what you mean Trillium?
Lesley x
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Trillium

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2013, 14:30 »
That's probably what it is. When I buy it, it's called 'light spelt' so I'd assume there's already a wheat flour ratio blended in to lighten it for bread baking. Considering the cost, I'd just as soon blend in my own wheat flour which I can get cheaper.

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Kleftiwallah

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2013, 19:30 »

Gonna try bread with buttermilk, if I can find it!  An Irish relative goes bananas for the stuff.

Cheers,   Tony.
I may be growing OLD, but I refuse to grow UP !

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grendel

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2013, 19:55 »
get some thick cream, put it in a jamjar and shake until it turns to butter, the liquid left is your buttermilk - plus you get home made butter to go on your bread.
Grendel
we do the impossible daily, miracles take a little longer.

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surbie100

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2013, 21:32 »
Having scandi/germanic origins I'm very keen on rye. I mix it half and half usually.

Made this one yesterday - should have gone with the gut feeling that 1 tbsp salt was way too much - I put in less than called for and it's bordering on inedible and didn't rise well. They must mean 1 tsp...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/scandinavian_rye_bread_93361

PS Have only used spelt as a grain, not a flour, but it's a delicious substitute for rice/bulgar wheat.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2013, 21:33 by surbie100 »

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allotmentann

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2013, 08:36 »
I think it may have that much salt to counter the amount of sugar. I don't usually add sugar to bread, I can always taste it and I don't like sweet bread unless it is meant to be a 'sweet' bread - like fruit loaf etc. I usually use two teaspoons of salt to 500g of flour, so a tablespoon in that recipe is only one extra, which with the two tablespoons of sugar is probably right. A change in the amount of salt or sugar in a loaf compared to what you are used to is very noticeable isn't it? I recently made rye for the first time (I thought that it tasted pretty much like wholemeal, although it was a light or medium rye that I used) and I used this recipe and will definitely use it again, it even came out looking just like the picture! :)
http://www.breadcetera.com/?p=83

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New shoot

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2013, 11:23 »
To go back to keeping dough from developing a hard skin, it needs a protected atmosphere so the surface doesn't dry.  I've got a cheap houseplant hand sprayer that I only use for bread and lightly spray the surface of loaves with water, then cover loosely with cling film.

They get another spray as they go into the oven to keep the crust from setting too fast.  You get a much better 'oven rise' doing this  :)

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Kleftiwallah

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Re: Problem with bread.
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2013, 13:35 »

A partial success  ::)  I left the bread dough in the oven during the final 45 min' proving under as damp towel to stop a skin forming on the top.  BUT. . .carefully removing the towel caused a partial deflation of the dough. 

I left it half an hour longer and it came up again (the tops not quite as rounded) but a definite improvement. :)

Cheers and thanks for all the hints. :) :) :)

Cheers,   Tony.



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