Allotment Gardening Advice Help Chat

Poultry and Pets => The Hen House => Topic started by: Kate and her Ducks on September 18, 2009, 22:06

Title: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Kate and her Ducks on September 18, 2009, 22:06
Well it is getting to the time of year when the nights start closing in and the world starts getting ready for winter.

Unfortunately for us that seems to mean a really abrupt increase in fox attacks on our hens and ducks. There was a really dramatic increase this time last year and I was one of them and the pattern seems to be repeating itself this year.

It seems to be a combination of the early nights catching people out, many more foxes around as this years cubs mature and are not yet thinned out by the winter and the dropping levels of food making them all more bold.

It is a truely heartbreaking sight to come out to the carnage left by a fox so it is the time to take extra care locking up your birds.

Be vigilent!!!

This might help:

http://chat.allotment-garden.org/index.php?topic=25998.0
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: chickenlady on September 18, 2009, 22:14
We went to grannies last night and we got back when it was dark! the muscovies had gone to bed but as i wasnt home the door was wide open!  :ohmy: and the runners were already in bed but the door shut so bob and vi couldnt get in and found them asleep outside the growers shed! i was stressing all the way home! next time i think there may be a slight chance we will be back after dark i will definately have to chase them to bed before we go, for their own safety!

Debbie


Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: iwantanallotment on September 19, 2009, 00:04
Same here, Debbie. They all go into their houses at practically 7 on the dot, but still need someone to shut the doors after them.
Tonight I was surprised to see the youngsters still out at 7 - the door had blown shut and they couldn't get in  :ohmy:  Bless, they weren't happy. Thankfully I was here, but it was scary. What if I wasn't?
Like you, I'd rather shut them in early if needs be and know they're safe than take any chances with Mr Fox.
Lost my last lot of girls to him a few years back, a devastating sight as Kate said  :(
After finding them like that, and our faithful special layer ripped apart showing next morning's early egg inside her, it's taken several years to find the courage to get more.
Many think foxes don't come out until the wee hours....WRONG! They are out at dusk, and earlier in some cases, even daylight.
We ALL have foxes on our doorstep, cities as much as country lanes. Even if you don't see them, they're there.

Please all be careful, they don't miss an opportunity  :mad:





Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Jeanette on September 19, 2009, 16:14
Please Please take care i lost my chooks to a fox at 3-30 in the afternoon last year.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: upert on September 19, 2009, 20:48
how deep will a fox dig to get in a run? i've buried wire a foot deep all around AND have planks at the base of the welded mesh sides. I've covered the run with wire too so the only way a fox could get in is underneath.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: iwantanallotment on September 20, 2009, 00:29
I'm worried about that too, Upert. It doesn't help that my dozy lot are digging along the fence to help him in  :mad: There are deep gravel boards buried below my fence that I thought would render the fence safe.......no way, with these JCB diggers  >:(

Got to think of plan B now. My worry isn't how deep the fox will dig, but my daft girlies to welcome him in ::)

"L" shaped fencing is a good deterrent Upert, to bury wire at an angle - so that after so much digging, the fox will hit a "plate" of wire and not be able to dig any further.
Think I need to do that too, to secure my JCB crew.

Sorry if that's not too clear....just think of an L.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: dizzylizzie on September 20, 2009, 13:30
glad im not the only one with chickens that dig...i dont mind the dust baths,its the digging to australia that botheres me lol :D...im sure they are hiding shovels under all thoes lovely new feathers :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: too many girls on September 20, 2009, 13:49
Please Please take care i lost my chooks to a fox at 3-30 in the afternoon last year.

me too 35 of them in the space of a couple of hours :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: North Devon Dumpling on September 20, 2009, 14:58
We found a fox at the bottom of the garden this morning about 11am, the closest we have ever seen one.  We always keep a general look out anyway but were surprised to see one this close.  Will have to keep vigilent and maybe start keeping the girls in their run again - they will hate it and make lots of noise but at least they will be safe (still working on the electic fence enclosure project!).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Thrift on September 21, 2009, 09:11
Yes, we lost two hens to Reynard at around 3pm on both occasions.

Our main problem has been maturing cubs out practising 'the hunt' and the silly girls going walkabout in the fields!

Having been dogless for a year maybe we should take the plunge and get them a minder.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: longbow on September 21, 2009, 12:23
Being in the suberbs of London, we have foxes galore. During darkness we have at least one fox an hour passing the the house at the front and god only knows how many passing through the unlit back garden where the hens are kept. From time to time they can be sen sleeping in the sun on neighbouring shed roofs. Now I like foxes so decided that my chickens would only have access to a run and not the whole garden (I also like my plants). So I took my time and converted an unproductive part of the garden which is shaded by trees for most of the day into a 20ft x 6ft fully enclosed run. It has a base of 4" x 4" gate posts laid flat and staked to the ground to which the upright panels approx 7' x 3' made from 2" x 1" ,are attached. These are covered in aviary mesh as is the roof. I then dug out the interior to about a foot and laid down more aviary wire all overlapped and attached to the gate posts then refilled adding with the earth alot of potting compost which keeps the ground relatively soft for the birds to scratch around in and because we only have 3 hens in this large run, apart from the droppings that are left in the coop itself the run is self composting. I was also a big concern that vermin were not attracted and I am 99% confident that even mice cannot get in! I'll post some pics if I can.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: darrena on September 21, 2009, 21:22
Does anyone know a good ultrasonic fox detterent and do they really work??????
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Kate and her Ducks on September 22, 2009, 07:33
I've used one as it can't hurt but I would never rely on it over good fox proof barriers. Just got mine off the internet, can't remember the brand.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: compostqueen on September 22, 2009, 11:23
Timely warning.  My girls were attacked yesterday evening  :(  My gobby girl kicked up such a racket (really bloodcurling noise) and my OH was out there immediately and the fox was still there, caught up in the run netting - thank God!

One of my girls lay dead, one was missing and the other was obviously injured.  I picked her up and collected the missing one who was heading for our back door by this time but thankfully uninjured.  The other was really traumatised and completely off her legs, her feathers were all over the place  :(

The fox got free and ran off and my husband went to retrieve the dead girl who turned out to be ALIVE, she was just playing dead!  Both girls made it through the night, I kept the poorliest one in the kitchen in a travel box overnight. Both were quite alert this morning, but one very wonky on her leg and very unbalanced, the other girls feathers were all over the place and hanging off in spectacular fashion, the run was covered in feathers.  I am very concerned and rang the vet who says to leave them well alone for now, and then ring him back if they get any worse :(  I was horrified  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Rubellite on September 22, 2009, 22:39
Oh dear - I do hope they pull through. Perhaps your vet meant not to add to their stress but just observe and keep them warm and safe unless they take a turn for the worse?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: withnail on September 22, 2009, 23:24
sorry to hear that compost queen

on saturday our neighbour said she had seen a fox in our garden and that it was cooly eyeing her through the hedge. this was at 11:30 am  :ohmy: the chickens (in their run)were going ape

we are due to go away for a week and we will have to leave the pophole open  :blink:
im pretty confident that only a very determined fox will dig in to the run, but it does unnerve you when you know that they know the chickens are there

the neighbour is going to keep an eye on them and collect the eggs, shes getting on a bit so i dont want to burden her with the pophole thing morning and night



Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on September 23, 2009, 07:34
Quote from Radio 4 this morning 07:25 ish 23/09/09.
RSPB survey of birds and wildlife in British gardens has revealed that:
1 in 4 British gardens are visited by foxes.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: compostqueen on September 23, 2009, 08:57
I was going to increase my flock by three new girls as mine are nearly two years old now and their laying whilst still pretty good is beginning to get sporadic.  I've changed my mind now and won't be getting any more. This attack has put me right off  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: vicpic39 on September 25, 2009, 19:50
Hi all!, getting slightly obsessed re foxes!! I live in an urban area and have to work a max of 2 days per week. the girls free range all day when im here. As the nights get longer im worried about keeping them in the run all day and would rather they freerange, however im worried about foxes when im not around. The garden is surrounded by both 7ft fencing and equal height privet. we have dug in wire under all fencing and privet. i get the old man to liberally douse boundaries with urine on a regular basis!!!
what do you think should i let them freerange or keep them in their run? cheers v much. P.S. Shirley has perked up, still on antibiotics fingers crossed.
vic xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Thrift on September 25, 2009, 22:13
I wonder is there more chance of penned chickens being completely wiped out if a fox gets in as they have nowhere to get away?

I have lost an odd one to the fox but the rest dispersed by flying up into trees and onto walls etc.

They are in the hen house at night and free range during the day. Fingers crossed everyone!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: janeheritage on September 26, 2009, 13:53
I'm very interested in any views about free range birds managing to esacape the fox. Mine have the range of the back of our garden, full of shrubs etc. If a fox came for them would they be able to fly away? Any experience?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Kate and her Ducks on September 26, 2009, 18:34
Really please don't count on it.

Don't rely on luck to keep your birds safe. Some of them might fly to safety but they might not and the fox will just be back the next time if it knows dinner is about.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on September 26, 2009, 21:14
.........
what do you think should i let them freerange or keep them in their run? cheers v much. ......

As I said earlyer.

Quote from Radio 4 this morning 07:25 ish 23/09/09.
RSPB survey of birds and wildlife in British gardens has revealed that:
1 in 4 British gardens are visited by foxes.

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: poultrygeist on September 28, 2009, 10:34
If you bear in mind that foxes have been taking chickesn long before they were kept in fox-proof runs and are quite good at it after several hundred thousand years of evolution. I don't mean that flippantly, but they are very, very well adapted at sneaking up on prey and managing to get the slower ones.
They have 2 great advantages. They are very agile, like a cat, and very intelligent, like a dog.
I have a great deal of respect for them and can't help but amire them but wouldn't want one to come for tea  ???

Rob 8)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: pandora on September 29, 2009, 22:27
5 of mine were taken in May by a fox, in the daytime, including the hen that I found impossible to catch as she would fly into a tree whenever I went anywhere near her. They were free-ranging on my 5 acres, and of the 5 killed only one was eaten, the rest abandonned. Husband was not flavour of the month (I was out and he said he would keep an eye on the hens.) Mine ar now in an enormous pen surrounded by an electric fence. I don't even trust that - I know a pig farmer who keeps a bunch of cockerels in his maternity field. He says it is the easiest way to tell if his pig fences are vulnerable to foxes, if a cockerel is taken. The foxes like to break into the maternity unit - they can take the piglets from a farrowing sow as she is delivering them and helpless to defend them. He loses about 260 piglets a year in this way, and that is even with his fields surrounded by a 9 strand 6000 volts mains powered fence. When it snows you can see where the foxes test the fence, by their pawprints left in the snow.

Do not underestimate the fox. For 364 days of the year your free-ranging birds may be safe, then on the 365th day he will have the lot in one go.

Our local fox killed 19 out of 20 adult geese in a night. I am a member of the local hunt, and people in the village shop are asking me to ask the hunt to have an 'accident,' but it isn't as easy as that. The most effective way of getting rid of the fox is now illegal, so more underhand and inhumane ways must be adopted. Since losing my first hens to her, I have had a man with a gun try to dispatch her, but this fox is a tricky vixen and does not sit in the gun's sights easily. The alternatives are trapping or poisoning her. Both of which would lead to much slower and more painful deaths than a hound would.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on September 29, 2009, 22:34
I agree with hunting but .... the only way I believe is to protect against foxes. There will always be another fox to fill the boots of the fox you have just killed.  Not intimidately  but in a week a month or a year there will be one along to get your chucks unless you have secured your chickens appropriately.
I think your farmer must be something wrong id a fox can get over a 9 wire fence. As my experience there is no such thing as a fox that can stand a jolt from a fence.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: pandora on September 30, 2009, 08:05
You are right - where you leave a gap it will be filled by another fox. But some are more problematic than others. The one near us is a well known vixen which is a real bother, and she raises her cubs to be as much trouble as she is. There are other foxes about who are not so bold, and less inclined to venture into back gardens to take poultry and pets. The good thing about a hunt rather than shooting or trapping is that they can be so much more specific.

As for the farmer - he uses the standard industry recognized fencing, with a bit more juice going round it. He can see the pawprints going through the fence (not over - through!) and checks the current - all working. The alternative, which many farmers go for, is to keep their pigs inside for virtually their entire lives. Not a satisfactory answer. I'd rather keep the hunting and have my bacon from happy pigs in the fresh air!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on September 30, 2009, 08:13
............As for the farmer - he uses the standard industry recognized fencing, with a bit more juice going round it. He can see the pawprints going through the fence (not over - through!) and checks the current - all working. The alternative, which many farmers go for, is to keep their pigs inside for virtually their entire lives. Not a satisfactory answer. I'd rather keep the hunting and have my bacon from happy pigs in the fresh air!

I am suprised very. If he has his fence set up with one live and one earth wire there is noway on this earth a fox can climb over it.
"For a secure boundary fence which will also exclude foxes, consider a 9 wire fence approximately 120cms (4ft) high, using stranded steel wire. With the fence wired alternatively live/earth a fox scrambling over or jumping between wires will receive a shock even though his feet are off the ground. "
found here http://www.rutland-electric-fencing.co.uk/PageAnimalSwine.aspx (http://www.rutland-electric-fencing.co.uk/PageAnimalSwine.aspx)

I would also bait the fence (I regularly bait mine).  This will teach the fox or badger to respect the fence.

I am sure your farmer may believe he is doing it correctly but we all need reminding of we to do every now and again.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: ssc on October 03, 2009, 17:22
Hello All  -  I have just joined the board, and noticed this thread.  Have been keeping poultry for over 30 years, and parents before me.

I always used to let all my poultry free range, with little trouble, as long as they were shut in at dusk, but as time has gone on the foxes have become more troublesome, and will sometimes take stock during the day even when someone is around!  I wonder if urban foxes are less worried about humans, and even where I live, (in the open countryside) trapped urban foxes are often released to enjoy their freedom in the country when becoming too troublesome in the town.

I have found that electrified poultry fencing is safe against foxes/badgers, even when the popholes are not shut at night, though you must ensure that as the vegetation it does not short the fencing out. 

People mentioned digging in chicken wire, this is effective if you do not dig it in straight down, but just under the surface of the soil, bend it outwards from the pen at 90 degrees and bury it so there is about 15" - 24 " of it level with the surface, but just underneath the grass.  It is best to use the stronger smaller mesh wire for this, as normal chicken wire is too flimsy, and any determined fox would scratch through.  Last year I made a large pen for ducks (foxes favourite meal) which was 6ft chicken mesh at the top and then overlapping 3ft small wire at the bottom, following the directions, as above. 

I hope this is clear, but it is difficult to explain without waving ones hands about.

The other way is to have 6 ft chicken mesh pens, with a single stand of electric wire about 12" away on the outside of the pen at about 6 -9" high from the ground, which prevents the fox/badger  from digging under the chicken wire.  Foxes can easily jump  6ft, but generally need something to land their feet on, so never have wood at the top of the wire.
And don't forget badgers love to eat meat and will regularly dig out rabbit nests.    They are much stronger diggers and biters, but again the electric fence seems a deterrent.  My original hen house had some of the smaller stronger wire mesh stapled  to the bottom 24" of my chicken house to stop this.  Many poultry houses are made of quite flimsy wood.

If you can, site any housing closer to the middle, rather than the edge of the pen this seems to help, as the fox cannot smell the poultry at such tantalizingly close quarters.


Hope I have explained this properly.  The main thing is to keep them shut in before dark, and be around and active in the area during the day.  I have also heard that man-pee at strategic points is also a deterrent, but cannot vouch for this!

All the best
Susan

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: marygall on October 05, 2009, 08:38
Does anyone have any veiws on poultry arks? If the ramp is up are the hens safe at night?
I noticed that something (probably a rat) had been chewing at the ark yesterday and this morning there was a burrow under it to allow access to something small, thank goodness.
I move the ark regularly, so burying chicken wire isn't an option, should I invest in another type of housing?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on October 05, 2009, 08:54
I the coop is made well an ark type coop with the ramps that raise closing all access to the coop at night are good.

With regards to the small
....burrow under it to allow access to something small, thank goodness.
.......
That will be rodents of some sort mice or rats.  Do you take the chicken feed away at night, if you do not then you must. That is what the mice/rats are after.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on October 05, 2009, 09:36
Underneath my arks and small hen houses we have stapled 1"square galvanised welded wire mesh. Grass still comes through but not rats, mice, stoats etc. My shed is raised on breeze blocks and then has a ledge of metal to prevent rats getting in (when placed just on it's 8" wheels the rats chewed a small hole in the pop hole and along the floor/side joints - all done over 2 nights).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Rubellite on October 05, 2009, 10:54
I have also tacked mesh beneath the floor in the sleeping compartment of my ark :mellow:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Jane-M on October 06, 2009, 14:07
OMIGOD! I feel quite ill with fright now. Any foxes near us must be shy creatures for no-one in my lane has ever seen one near the houses, but obviously they are lurking out there out of sight. We have three bothersome pullets just now who refuse to go indoors at dusk, they go to roost in our big beech hedge and are totally unbudgeable. I hope the colder evenings will drive them indoors.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on October 06, 2009, 14:11
Jane-M have you checked out your coop for redmite?  It is normal for them not want to got in the coop if there is red mite there.  I would suggest that you pick them off the hedge and put them on the perching bar in the coop (if mite free) and close the pop hole door. The will be an easy target in the hedge. 

What type of coop do you have?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joolie on October 06, 2009, 17:16
Hi.
I could really do with some advice off experienced chicken keepers please.
 I worry so much about a bloomin fox getting my girls that i've had to buy a warmer quilty cos i sleep with the window wide open listening out for any sign of trouble! I have my run stood on concrete and the girls are in their pop hole at night.  Will a fox be able to get to them if they are tucked in and there is no way of digging underneath?
I'm looking into getting a bigger run and some electric poulty netting but might there be no need for this?
My choccy lab guards the girls all day but comes in when they go to bed about 7pm. He's getting an id crisis as he eats their treats and even digs in the muck with them.
Cheers, Joolie x
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on October 07, 2009, 07:08
.............Will a fox be able to get to them if they are tucked in and there is no way of digging underneath?
............

If your coop is well made then your chickens should be safe at night.  Ask yourself could your Lab get in to the coop if really wanted to?
.............
I'm looking into getting a bigger run and some electric poulty netting but might there be no need for this?............
You chickens would always love a bigger run.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joolie on October 07, 2009, 17:26
Thanks Roughlee Handled,
Never thought of it like that - my lab would not be able to get in.  Might sleep a bit better at night now - cheers  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Jane-M on October 08, 2009, 15:13
Jane-M have you checked out your coop for redmite?  It is normal for them not want to got in the coop if there is red mite there.  I would suggest that you pick them off the hedge and put them on the perching bar in the coop (if mite free) and close the pop hole door. The will be an easy target in the hedge.  

What type of coop do you have?

Thanks for this Rough. The coop is clean as far as I can tell and the other 9 hens have no issues with sleeping in there. It is impossible to extricate the little blighters from the hedge as they are not on it but IN it. It is an old dense hedge 10 feet high and over 2 feet deep of tightly criss-crossing little branches and still in full leaf so you can't actually see them either, even if you stick your head into it (painfully scratchy). Oh and I forgot to say it is 60 feet long.

If I thought perhaps they just didn't like going in with the established flock, that would be fair does. But they had the little quarantine coop when they first came, and as soon as they were allowed out they took to roosting in the hedge. Perhaps that is what they were used to on the farm - I didn't think to ask. They fly like no-body's business as well.

I would be much much happier locking them in the hen house if I could get to them before they roost, but they roost before anyone else has gone to bed, and if I open the pop hole to let the others get to bed they run out again and up into the hedge... sigh. I am beginning to think that if they are so bone headed they deserve to be fox fodder  :wacko:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Roughlee Handled on October 08, 2009, 15:38
Jane-M I am at a loss on what to say.  I would suggest you start a new thread in the Hen house and see if anyone else has any ideas. 

What breed are they?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Jane-M on October 08, 2009, 15:41
Sort of Bovans Goldline type. Lovely birds but with minds of their own  ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on October 08, 2009, 15:54
Jane-M, I too have a hen (a silkie cross bantam) that will not sleep in our shed, instesd she has taken to sleeping in one of our apple trees (too high up for me to reach her - if I try she just climbs higher). She has been doing this for weeks now in fact ever since the day I sent her brother and sister down to live in Bedfordshire. Hopefully she will move back in to the shed when the tree loses it's leaves.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Alison_T on October 13, 2009, 13:30
I'm not sure if anyone has mentioned this, but I was told that if a male urinates around the coop area, this deters foxes...to this end, I got my husband to pee in a bucket for a day and tipped the urine around the garden! I've certainly not had any foxes around here since doing so!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: John on October 15, 2009, 23:51
My sister lives in the country, has 2 dogs and in came Mr Fox and killed 3 hens in the middle of the day when she, her husband and dogs were in the large garden that adjoins the paddock. He took seconds before running off with one leaving one dead and one mortally wounded.

Free range is not safe. Country or town they present a danger to unprotected hens. Nobody takes out insurance expecting to crash their car.. but we take it out.

Foxes are like most thieves, opportunist. Yes raffles the burglar can get into your house however you secure it but the actual threat is some young passing scally who spots the open window.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: sunshineband on October 16, 2009, 08:31
Anyone who has seen the carnage a fox on the rampage can leave behind after a killing spree with free range hens would never forget it.

IMHO foxes not only hunt for food but also just have a blood lust  :ohmy: :ohmy:

Double care, and as John says, being prepared for scallies, is the best way to keep those chooks (and ducks and turkeys  ;) ) safe.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on October 16, 2009, 10:09
Like TMG mine free range (I only have 1/2 acre but they also use the farmers field) and they have to take their chances as I have no wish to pen mine in. However this is a risk I will take (have lived here for 10 years and not seen a sign of a fox dead or alive within 5 miles neither have my dogs who will roll in fox poo if they find it  :tongue2: :tongue2: ). We do have badgers though and upto a couple of years ago there was a solitary mink about 1/2 mile away down the bridleway.
There are more foxes in urban areas (owing to greater amount of food around) and these have almost seperated into a seperate sub species of the fox (probably in a hundred years or so they will be completely seperate), also farmers now no longer provided copses for foxes to live and breed for the purpose of fox hunting (and before anybody tells me they never did that I can assure you some did although most will now deny it). Also around here (well 10 miles away) fox hunting still goes on as a sport but with a hawk taken along (I don't like fox hunting but it is a magnificent sight to see).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Alison_T on October 16, 2009, 13:11
I was reading the Smallholding magazine today which told of a smallholder who used her dog's summer coat clippings stuffed into old tights. She said she couldn't claim this to be the total answer, but they were fox-free for three months. The article also went on to say that one of the safest measures is to ensure that your birds go to bed before dusk and up about an hour after sunrise.

These are only suggestions that I have read about, and I hope that they do not upset anybody.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Foxy on October 16, 2009, 15:41
Have just been "dusting" over this thread, purely to maintain focus on the really useful information everyone has offered! :)

Please keep adding any useful tips or ideas, or posting any concerns you may have about protecting your chooks from Mr Raynaud ;) :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: woodside farm on October 20, 2009, 23:19
Human hair stuffed in tights is supposed to work also.
As for the hens in the hedges you really need to get them sorted, I had a load of leghorns used to roost every night in a tree, they where not really a problem as the tree was quite young and if you shook it they all jumped out and went to bed, but I had two sablepoot cockerels that we couldn't get out of another tree, they slept there for about 6 weeks before the fox got them  :(

Michelle xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: sam on lewis on November 17, 2009, 11:11
We are lucky where we live, there are NO foxes on the island, unfortunatley some twit decided that minks would be a good addition, so if you are near water you can loose birds to them, I have a burn at the bottom of our patch and have already lost a Musckovey to the minkies. Scottish Natural Heritage are trying to get shut of the minks by trapping but their success is not very good.
They also trap hedgehogs. The mink are killed but the hedgehogs are flown to the mainland for release.

I found a greylag goose the other day with a broken neck and two vampire like teeth marks in it's neck, poor thing was in agony, I had to cull it, WISH I COULD HAVE CULLED THE DAMNED MINK INSTEAD
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Aunt Sally on November 17, 2009, 11:14
Not the mink's fault Sam, they are just being minks.

It's the fault of the idiots who released them.  Non-native species can and do cause absolute havock and even extinction of native species.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Sassy on November 17, 2009, 17:10
Human hair stuffed in tights is supposed to work also.
As for the hens in the hedges you really need to get them sorted, I had a load of leghorns used to roost every night in a tree, they where not really a problem as the tree was quite young and if you shook it they all jumped out and went to bed, but I had two sablepoot cockerels that we couldn't get out of another tree, they slept there for about 6 weeks before the fox got them  :(

Michelle xx

I read about using human hair so I put it round my pens in tights - I thought that if it didn't do any good it couldn't hurt!! There are loads of foxes around us and they will come into the village in the middle of the day and take chickens. My chooks are about a quarter of a mile outside the village and so far I have not had trouble in 5 years of keeping them. Of course I don't know if the hair helps! I may have just been lucky ::) ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Foxy on December 24, 2009, 20:08
Good idea to double check those fox defences, as it is quieter with peeps away fro Christmas, the fox will become bolder. Almost walked into one today he was so close.....so watch out everyone!!!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: IMOmimey on December 25, 2009, 22:50
The recent snowfall has shown us the tracks of the foxes "regular" walk, through our garden. our choox still ok thankfully, but its still worrying.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Foxy on December 25, 2009, 22:53
The recent snowfall has shown us the tracks of the foxes "regular" walk, through our garden. our choox still ok thankfully, but its still worrying.


Your not wrong :( Have spotted fox tracks. One of my cats keeps a cache, he hunts rabbits and squirrels and hides them. The fox raided it overnight, must've have been hungry.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on December 26, 2009, 09:27
the only tracks in our snow have been flippin rat tracks (so guess that I am lucky).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: CWatters on December 28, 2009, 21:53
Do ultrasonic dog/cat scarers work on foxes? Do they annoy the chickens?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on December 28, 2009, 22:16
Do ultrasonic dog/cat scarers work on foxes? Do they annoy the chickens?

My father-in-law has an ultrasonic device set up to deter foxes.... had it a few months and hasn't seen a fox in the immediate area since it went in...

... unlike my allotment plot.... found the remains of what was once a large grey pigeon... just feathers and a tiny peice of wing joint remaining.... a fox, I imagine... but may have been a cat (?)

I didn't feel too sorry at having one less pigeon in the area!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: dicky614 on January 03, 2010, 16:22
Last year a fox had one of mine. The girls were free ranging and I was in the garden renewing the fence. I had a fire going and the radio on, He must have been watching for some time and took his chance when i had my back turned! Since then I have sectioned off the garden and they only free range in there, but only when I'm in there with them,(which isn't often this weather) the rest of the time they are secure in their run.
I have heard about male urine being a deterent and actively encourage free range weeing when we have the odd barbeque!!
 I hav'nt seen a fox since, although that doesn't mean he aint there.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: webwahm on January 10, 2010, 00:52
Blimey  :unsure:

Just read the whole thread, after reading others too, and I'm worried.

I've been letting my hens out in their makeshift run, while I get the mesh up (can't because of the snow!) - it's an old garden building/greenhouse thing on the allotment cobbled together with glass, plastic garden netting and even a fabric type net.  Because it's daytime, I presumed they'd be ok as long as I got them in the coop before the evening.  So I've been going back up about 5/6pm.

Now I know different.

Also, my rabbit at home 'free ranges' - he can't get out of our yard but now I'm paranoid about something getting in.  He's been wild like this for almost a year - I try catch him and he goes into all his hidey-holes.  Been keeping him in with the snow etc. but he got out earlier and right now, he's under the hutch and it's nearly 1am.  Even if he was in his hutch, I bet a fox could get him through the wire that's on it  :unsure: 

Feels like I've been watching Crimewatch..."don't have nightmares!"

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on January 29, 2010, 02:20
as a male i go when i got to go, i always have a pee down the chickens every week or so, it seems to keep the fox's away but the cockrawls dnt seem to happy about it ::)
also a cockrawl is good protection for a flock and have seen mine fight a cat that jumped into the pen ??? it was a big dark grey one and it acturly had a hart attack and pelted it.

i know a cat is not a fox but would u rather your cockrawl gets eaten or your prize hen.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on January 29, 2010, 02:24
also a trick is if u rasie the hutch like 8ft of the floor and have a long thin tree branch that leads from the floor to door, cutch grooves in it and u are sorted, the fox can move its legs in so it will not be able to walk up, it can try asmuch as it likes but it aint getting up, this will save u shutting them up aswell.

but personaly i cant sleep unless i know my cooks are safley locket up.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Foxy on January 29, 2010, 09:06
as a male i go when i got to go, i always have a pee down the chickens every week or so, it seems to keep the fox's away but the cockrawls dnt seem to happy about it ::)
also a cockrawl is good protection for a flock and have seen mine fight a cat that jumped into the pen ??? it was a big dark grey one and it acturly had a hart attack and pelted it.

i know a cat is not a fox but would u rather your cockrawl gets eaten or your prize hen.

Unfortunately, yes the fox may take the cockerel first, but then will simply kill the rest either that night or will come back later :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 29, 2010, 23:48
also a trick is if u rasie the hutch like 8ft of the floor and have a long thin tree branch that leads from the floor to door, cutch grooves in it and u are sorted, the fox can move its legs in so it will not be able to walk up, it can try asmuch as it likes but it aint getting up, this will save u shutting them up aswell.

but personaly i cant sleep unless i know my cooks are safley locket up.

I've seen Bristol foxes snoozing in the sun on flat roofs just a few feet above the heads of passers by. They are pretty good at jumping and not bad at climbing either.... take care.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on January 30, 2010, 04:23
yea but if u are around u should hopfully hear him making a noise, my hutches are fox proof but i am planing on biulding the run taller and putting a roof on it to keep the dryer when it rains.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: sunshineband on January 30, 2010, 18:15
What dryer is that then? :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 31, 2010, 15:15
I've not seen any foxes since Christmas... It was about that time I "dropped" a fresh chicken on the edge of the field on my way home from parent visiting.

Perhaps it was even further past its sell-by-date than I thought  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Nat100 on February 20, 2010, 13:25
2 foxes jumped the 6ft fence around my garden the other spring and killed my 4 chickens at 3 0'clock in the afternoon so please don't assume they will only strike after dark. If they have young mouths to feed they will attack at any hour and they aren't afraid of humans either!!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on February 20, 2010, 14:26
If they have young mouths to feed they will attack at any hour and they aren't afraid of humans either!!!

Town foxes are certainly more confident these days... they stand and look before casually turning and walking away... No danger to us personally - unless cornered.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: nic.chad on February 22, 2010, 23:24
we have alot of fox activity being in a farming area and i havnt had a chicken taken yet ( thank goodness). I have heard the horror stories! I built my hen house right next to my dog run and the dogs go off if anything is near, maybe this and the fact that my 2 cats roam my yard at night ( i know thats naughty) has so far kept the chooks safe? my chook house has no door, just a ladder leading up to a hole so the chooks come and go as they please. Ive had a crow come and steal eggs but a rubber snake at the entrance took care of that!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on February 22, 2010, 23:46
Take care with those chooks.... once a fox decides to pop in there's no stopping them... the dogs may help but.......
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: nic.chad on February 28, 2010, 23:43
Very true...
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on March 01, 2010, 19:58
Cycling from my Mum's place very late the other night I discovered I had lost my gloves (cold fingers)...

I traced back along my route and saw one glove in the middle of the quiet side-road at the same time catching sight of a fox watching nervously from the foot-path while trying to hide in a hedge.

One glove? Where was the other?

Nowhere to be seen....... If anyone spots a fox wearing / chewing a left-handed black glove tell  the little s*d to let me have it back as I have the one to go with it!  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: hendreary on March 03, 2010, 11:52
This is interesting
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1254900/Revenge-chicken-Three-hens-cockerel-named-Dude-peck-fox-death-broken-coop.html
 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1254900/Revenge-chicken-Three-hens-cockerel-named-Dude-peck-fox-death-broken-coop.html)
Chickens get their own back!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on March 04, 2010, 00:18
Eggs from that bird might lead to a whole new strain of fox resistant fowl!!! :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: robinsnest on March 13, 2010, 19:38
Lost five of my girls today at 1.30 in the afternoon, absolute carnage, found two hiding and one slightly injured (she has been attacked before and survived so hopefully she will make it) They had only been let out 20 mins as I was in the garden, went in the house to make lunch and when I got back outside, silence.

This is the third fox attack in three years - all in the daytime. Feeling pretty miserable at the moment :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on March 13, 2010, 19:43
Oh so sorry to hear this, hugs xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: janet12000 on March 13, 2010, 19:51
sending love and hugs xxx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Thrift on March 13, 2010, 21:44
How awful, poor you and girls. xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Brambles on March 13, 2010, 21:55
We have several foxes that visit all the henhouses most nights.   All our neighbours that keep poultry are kept very aware of their presence.   A few nights ago, we heard a scuffling in our loft (we live in a bungallow)...  It sounded like a very large rat or bird.  On investigating, OH came face to face with a "rather put out" fox!   She has visited most days since and we have finally found how she has been getting in.   (Hole now blocked up securely!)   Tomorrows first job.... FLEA SPRAY IN THE LOFT!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: spiningjenny on March 13, 2010, 22:59
Visit from fox yesterday morning at 6am!
Ive lost my call duck and have one very lonely drake, and one hen as my dogs disturbed further carnage.
I,m just heartbroken, I had only just opened the hen house!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on March 13, 2010, 23:38
so sorry spinningjenny xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Little Devil on March 14, 2010, 01:40
Very sorry to hear your sad news.  I'm worried about my Little Devil as she keeps escaping and we can't seem to find where she's getting out.  We border fields so are sure the foxes know about them.  Hope that your injured hen survives the ordeal.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: robinsnest on March 15, 2010, 19:55
Lost five of my girls today at 1.30 in the afternoon, absolute carnage, found two hiding and one slightly injured (she has been attacked before and survived so hopefully she will make it) They had only been let out 20 mins as I was in the garden, went in the house to make lunch and when I got back outside, silence.

This is the third fox attack in three years - all in the daytime. Feeling pretty miserable at the moment :(

Just a quick update - all three remaining hens are still alive, one is perfectly ok, one has a broken lower wing but it doesn't seem to bother her and Penny the Goldline is still looking poorly but has taken food today and is drinking well. She is a bit unsteady, although I feel she might make a good recovery ... will keep you posted.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on March 15, 2010, 23:33
fingers crossed for you and your girls, xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Dominic on March 25, 2010, 14:43
Slightly off the wall question.

What happens if my dog kills a fox that went for my chickens?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on March 25, 2010, 15:20
so long as you wasn't hunting with your dog I don't see a problem although perhaps a legal buff may well correct me on this.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: madcat on March 25, 2010, 15:30
Not a problem if it is just nature doing its thing - dog on dog, and you weren't encouraging the situation, I would have thought. But in the interests of not getting yourself in the way of those who assume any fox killed involves men in red coats, I would be discreet about the incident.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: lucylou on March 26, 2010, 22:39
we had a visit this afternoon about 4.30. fox has hurt 2 of my girls, one badly. Another girl got caught in the electric fence and died. I am just so sad, lucylou x
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: rock_chick on March 27, 2010, 11:51
Sorry about your girls Lucylou. x

It's not just foxes you need to be careful of. My parents' neighbour warned us about badgers, as she had an incident a couple of weeks ago. She shut her hens in the coop at night, and next morning when she went to open the door to let them out, a badger ran out and when she checked it had killed/eaten all but 2 of her girls. She checked the coop, but no sign of damage, so the badger must have wandered in and fallen asleep during the day, and then when she had locked the door it was trapped. So be careful when you shut your coop, we now check everytime before shutting our girls up for the night.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: patandlaura on March 27, 2010, 18:49
I've had one of those electrical fox deterrents for a while, and although we have seen a fox occasionally since, during the day, it seems to keep to the side of the garden.  I don't know if this is coincidence or if the gadget is working, but now I have two chickens I am quite nervous.
Has anyone else actually seen a fox jump when near one of these things?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on March 28, 2010, 16:15
Jumping foxes....

I think I might well end up with one of those although I have no chickens and no electric fence. But I do have a hole where the foxes like to dig at the end of my plot and today I saw a bumble bee in and out of it...

I'll happily keep the bees in place of the foxes!  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: patandlaura on March 28, 2010, 19:49
We bought the gadget originally because we saw a fox taking great interest in our pond, and we lost one of our goldfish.
I am not making any accusations here, but there was a wet trail nearby. 
As well as having the repeller facing the pond, we have now put a net across what looks like the fox's usual route through the garden, and blocked the hole under the fence that he has made, so hope he has now found a detour and the chickens are not on his new route (or menu!)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: robinsnest on March 28, 2010, 19:54
Lost five of my girls today at 1.30 in the afternoon, absolute carnage, found two hiding and one slightly injured (she has been attacked before and survived so hopefully she will make it) They had only been let out 20 mins as I was in the garden, went in the house to make lunch and when I got back outside, silence.

This is the third fox attack in three years - all in the daytime. Feeling pretty miserable at the moment :(

Just a quick update - all three remaining hens are still alive, one is perfectly ok, one has a broken lower wing but it doesn't seem to bother her and Penny the Goldline is still looking poorly but has taken food today and is drinking well. She is a bit unsteady, although I feel she might make a good recovery ... will keep you posted.


Just another quick update - Flossy remains in perfect health and is laying well, Maggie still has her broken wing but seems fine, no eggs yet but early days - as for Penny ... a full recovery and laid an egg today, she has to be the luckiest hen alive as she was taken by a fox last year but dropped as it tried to jump the fence!   :D :D :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: bigun108 on March 31, 2010, 17:07
i have just got 4 chucks but befor thay came to our garden i put a electric fence all round about a month befor hand ive had no problems with the fox touch wood ..ps no cat dodo on me vege plot either
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on April 01, 2010, 22:14
Some people have all the luck  ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: spizanne on May 18, 2010, 00:46
5 of mine were taken in May by a fox, in the daytime, including the hen that I found impossible to catch as she would fly into a tree whenever I went anywhere near her. They were free-ranging on my 5 acres, and of the 5 killed only one was eaten, the rest abandonned. Husband was not flavour of the month (I was out and he said he would keep an eye on the hens.) Mine ar now in an enormous pen surrounded by an electric fence. I don't even trust that - I know a pig farmer who keeps a bunch of cockerels in his maternity field. He says it is the easiest way to tell if his pig fences are vulnerable to foxes, if a cockerel is taken. The foxes like to break into the maternity unit - they can take the piglets from a farrowing sow as she is delivering them and helpless to defend them. He loses about 260 piglets a year in this way, and that is even with his fields surrounded by a 9 strand 6000 volts mains powered fence. When it snows you can see where the foxes test the fence, by their pawprints left in the snow.

Do not underestimate the fox. For 364 days of the year your free-ranging birds may be safe, then on the 365th day he will have the lot in one go.

Our local fox killed 19 out of 20 adult geese in a night. I am a member of the local hunt, and people in the village shop are asking me to ask the hunt to have an 'accident,' but it isn't as easy as that. The most effective way of getting rid of the fox is now illegal, so more underhand and inhumane ways must be adopted. Since losing my first hens to her, I have had a man with a gun try to dispatch her, but this fox is a tricky vixen and does not sit in the gun's sights easily. The alternatives are trapping or poisoning her. Both of which would lead to much slower and more painful deaths than a hound would.

6000 volts? 240 is the max on the grid
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on May 18, 2010, 15:50
My seedlings and transplanted veg doesn't stand a chance.... there's no way any of them will be fast enough to out run a pack of playful foxes..  ::)

I often visit the plot to discover new plants flattened and tell-tale fox prints all over new seed beds.... as well as holes dug in the middle of newly germinated plants.

So.... I was not at all pleased to see three holes dug around my compost heap and timber pile - the little B***s have moved in to be nearer  :ohmy:  :mad:

Do you think a hose pipe in their front door might encourage them to move on?  :unsure:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: deannatrois on June 01, 2010, 22:29
I think all this has put me off keeping hens.  My OH has refused to donate any liquids., and I don't think I'd feel too easy putting an electrified fence around the coop as it would have to be on the allotment.., which I am five mins away from but its not the same as having it in your garden.

I was prepared to fight the council to be able to put a coop in that allotment but not at risk of having the hens killed with me five mins away. I live in an urban area.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 02, 2010, 00:45
I guess urban areas now house as many if not more foxes per square mile as the country-side. We are to blame for being such mucky creatures and leaving waste food on the streets and strewn around our houses.

Some towns seem to have had fox urban fox populations for years - In Bristol they were common more than 30 years ago.

Where I live in a smallish sea-side town we now have them on every street corner and wandering happily in near daylight. Cats are not so safe or happy these days..

I'm not sure what the answer to your problem would be but I can see why you are having second thoughts - I would too.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: benboy on June 02, 2010, 00:56
Unfortunately I have had to temporarily separate two of my hens from two newbies due to severe bullying and injury.  The two older hens are now in a large 30ft run with no roof on.  They are safe at night as they sleep inside a plastic cat carrier.   The two newbies are in a "safe" enclosed pen.  I have let my hens out during the day until I return from work for some time now, but I now worry about this arrangement.  I thought they would be safe in a residential area, only having foxes during night time.  :unsure:

I have heard about using male, human urine around the chicken area.  I have a compost bin that I pour my urine in frequently :wub: right next to one of my runs and hen shed.  I also started puring some around the boundary of my garden.  Does anyone know about this method and it's effectiveness?  How often do you have to re-apply?  I also heard about human hair placed around the pen inside stockings  :wub:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 02, 2010, 01:02
Just don't go doing this in full-day light  :ohmy: or when there's a full moon, benboy!  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on June 02, 2010, 07:51
they are old fashioned country tales but like a lot of these tales there is often some truth in them. I get my OH to either sprinkle or do it into a watering can (makes it easier for me to spray it in the hedgerow) but I don't know if it works or not - never had a visit here from a fox (lost my ducks to a fox when I lived in Nottingham) but then again I've not seen a fox here in 10 years - we do have shoots though so perhaps a fox if seen gets caught up in that  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 02, 2010, 11:30
Dear old foxy...

It's good, in some respects, to see that us humans haven't driven yet another bit of wild-life off the face of the planet. Foxes like other life have a right to exist and a place in the scheme of things - just not so sure we really have to have so many of the little red varmints. They do seem to be very abundant at the moment in some parts.  :(

Our towns are ideal niches for them it seems - I just wish they would stick to clearing up  dropped take-aways in the streets rather than chasing the cats along our rear access drive and pouncing about in my veg patch - to say nothing of wandering off with next doorís rabbits!  >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: benboy on June 02, 2010, 22:38
Just don't go doing this in full-day light  :ohmy: or when there's a full moon, benboy!  :lol:

Ha ha!   :nowink:  I wee into a watering can at the kitchen door then sprinkle it around later. :wub:


Learner...... I totally agree  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 03, 2010, 18:57
Well officer, the problem is the foxes....  ::)  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: chriseales on June 09, 2010, 16:21
Hi I am new, I have heard that the scarecrow CAT's are very goos, they have an infared sensor attached to a sprinkler, and if they detect movment they spray out a jet of water and make a loud clicking sound, apparantley this is something that foxes will never get used to and will always avoid, also good fun to catch out unsuspecting guests!

They are usually around £50 but  I got one from ebay for £25,

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=370092764624
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on June 10, 2010, 18:07
but this would spray our chickens and other birds so I wouldn't use one. It wont just select foxes.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: chriseales on June 10, 2010, 20:03
but this would spray our chickens and other birds so I wouldn't use one. It wont just select foxes.

You are missing the point

Well it would if you have your chickens out and have it on during the day, but I have two situated next to my coop and run (pointing away from the coop and run) and I only have it switched on when the Chickens are in the run or house and overnight.

This keeps foxes away at night and prevents them attacking the hen house and trying to break in and discourages further visits.

During the daytime when my chickens (and children) are around in the garden I simply switch the unit off

Foxes will get used to smell and noise repelants over time but will never get used to a sudden soaking
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on June 10, 2010, 20:07
foxes also take chickens during the day and even when humans are nearby, they now are not scared of a human presence.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: chriseales on June 10, 2010, 20:08
foxes also take chickens during the day and even when humans are nearby, they now are not scared of a human presence.

Then there is not much we can do but keep the chucks locked up all day then I guess?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on June 10, 2010, 20:11
good electric fencing is probably the best method I'm afraid  :(.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: chriseales on June 11, 2010, 09:04
good electric fencing is probably the best method I'm afraid  :(.

I was only really refering to keeping foxes away at night, and the water sprayers are a cost effective method that works well for me as an urban chicken keeper.

As for daytime fox visits this is a whole different kettle of fish and raise a lot more problems for an urban kepper, electric fencing would be fine for someone with a large holding, but for an urban keeper this would mean fencing my entire garden perimeter which would be costly and difficult to do and also not be popular with my neighbours.

For urban keepers that have problems with fox visits during the daytime I have no idea what the solution could be. But for the urban keeper that wants to deter fox visits (and other animals such as cats and dogs that may foul your garden) I reccomend the water sprayers
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Avon on June 12, 2010, 06:19
I saw one cheeky chap at my hen arks at 7.30 the other day - and have more recently lost another bantam. 

The only real solution I have come across was my old man with his shot gun, trouble was this time he was asleep. 

Not PC I know, but having seen the way they just kill and rip my chucks heads of this 'veggie' still thinks its the best solution.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on June 14, 2010, 21:08
What dryer is that then? :)

lol late reply, but bad spelling :lol: i need to check before i post ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Speckly Sarah on June 18, 2010, 14:34
chriseales: Doesn't that also squirt water at the chickens when they move though???  :ohmy:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on June 18, 2010, 16:26
ok  this is what i read in my small houlders magazine yesterday.

HUTNING BAN "doubts"

Conservation plan to reintroduse fox hunting are in doubt with the formaion of a coalition goverment.
David camron came to a comperomise with liberal democrats leader nick clegg, MP's will now have the chanse to vote on a parliamentary motion later in the year on whether to hold a free vote on the ban. the free vote will only happen if the majority of the MP's support the motion, but its uncear whether MP's will back it.

get on to your MP'S casses about fox hunting people!!!!!!!! we need to make a diffrence and we need to do it now!! let the MP's here your apoions and veiws, but dnt just say somthing silly like i want them killed cuz i dnt like them and they eat my chickens....... that will be no good.

u will need to explain to them the problems, the advantages and the disavantages, u need to help them with idears for a solushion to sort the problem, like fox hunting only in the auton n winter.

well yea, any ways , just fort i would bring this to all your atenshion, tell me what u all feel on this matter.

thanks for lissionsing,

Josh.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: NormandyMary on June 19, 2010, 19:54
Last Saturday, we had devastation, I found 4 dead hens, and one of our cockerals, with 2 hens and the other cockerel injured.
We nursed the two hens back to health, and our beloved cockerel Monty was just getting his mojo back. This afternoon, at exactly the same time as last week, I discovered devastation again, this time my two small reds had been taken away, just a few feathers left, and my light sussex that had survived a pasting last week was decapitated. Monty too has been attacked again, I pray that he will pull through. Im left with one sussex broody who is sitting on 4 eggs (something which saved her as she was in the henhouse) and a grey who managed to jump the fence to escape. She did that last week too, bless her. We now have no option but to build a run for them, which was something we wanted to avoid, preferring our girls and boys to roam as free as possible.
Its such a sad day. Im left with only 2 hens, one of them broody, and injured Monty.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on June 20, 2010, 13:40
i am so sorry to here such bad news! i hopw monty will be ok, building a tall penced pen is the only thing to do now, they will keep coming back, as they now now theres a nice easy lunch woundering around your ganrden now... foxes dig well also so berrying the fence atleast 2ft under is a must and foxs clime well to....... so 8fth up is also a must, and evan that dnt some times stop em from climbing up when chased, so a little bit going out at the top will stop em from making the last bit and falling back down. sound like a prison i know but its the only way.... also they like to dig under gates so extra corshon must be made there.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: gem on June 20, 2010, 18:47
Well I woke up to a pile of feathers this morning and both my beautiful girls gone  :(  I am so sad today as they were part of the family.

I have been on this house over 25 years and there has been no signs of foxes but Im guessing thats what it was.  Seems to have opened the gate somehow and made its way in there.

RIP Milly and Tilly
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: GrannieAnnie on June 20, 2010, 22:03
My Brian was saying the other night that on the TV they said lots of townspeople are going around catching the urbanised foxes and releasing them back into the country!

Thanks Townies, that's all we need, MORE of the blooming things!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: raeburg on June 20, 2010, 22:18
When urban foxes are released into rural areas they are unafraid of people and prey on easy food such as domesticated chickens.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: John on June 21, 2010, 00:16
My Brian was saying the other night that on the TV they said lots of townspeople are going around catching the urbanised foxes and releasing them back into the country!

I'm afraid that's a solution by people not facing up to the facts. Urban foxes haven't much of a chance in the country and vice-versa. There's a huge problem with urban foxes but capture and release isn't fair on the urban fox, existing rural foxes or the people affected.

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 21, 2010, 00:28
Urban foxes are becoming increasingly 'tame'....

My aunt in south London was getting the washing in from one of those whirligig washing lines... she had sheets hung out. As she removed the last sheet she was a little shocked to see a fox laying a metre or two away sunning itself in her tiny back garden.

She fled.... not it as she is rather intinmidated by their boldness.  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joshbuchan on June 21, 2010, 17:30
My Brian was saying the other night that on the TV they said lots of townspeople are going around catching the urbanised foxes and releasing them back into the country!

Thanks Townies, that's all we need, MORE of the blooming things!!

well i can see both the argerments there.

fox's have no place in towns or citys and should be removed (i agree with that), but should not be dumped on other people back gardens, as a urban fox will be so used to easy pickings of the floor n out of bins, it will find it hard to live in the wild and catch food for its selfs. so they will try anything like domesticated chickens and other small livestock. this also cant be aloud!! but as the fox gets more hungrey they will get more desprote and will try any moment to get at your small livestock and as they are used to lots of people, watching u from a bush would be a dodle to them. this is a very big problem we have and the only way to stop this before it gets to far is by thining the numbers drasticly!! this will also give the wild birds and rodents more of a chanse, which in anouther case the rat and mise will increase!! so theres a fine balance that mother natur had sorted out purfectly, now we have really messed things up!
wolfs would of eaten any fox they seen, now we have killed all the wolfes theres was only us humens left to kill the fox's, now cuz of our old hell bend goverment (and dnt think our new one is to much better) likes to tax anything people see fun, they sore some people were injoying hunting fox's and other injoying keepong the trodishon alive!, as they cant tax death (o they would if they could) they banned it!! so theres nothing left to stop them from rearing every young they have!

so what can we do?? catch every fox we see and dump them on the goverments door steps?
they will jsut releace them into the wild i spose, but if we are there and ready to stop them releasing them into the wild were there are allready to meny then they will have to dispatch them, then that will give us somthing to work one i spose..... oh this is way to complecated....

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: NormandyMary on June 21, 2010, 21:03
Well I woke up to a pile of feathers this morning and both my beautiful girls gone  :(  I am so sad today as they were part of the family.

I have been on this house over 25 years and there has been no signs of foxes but Im guessing thats what it was.  Seems to have opened the gate somehow and made its way in there.

RIP Milly and Tilly

I am so sorry for your sad loss. Its always the first ones you lose that are the worst. Dont let it put you off keeping chooks, or the fox will have won! We are in the process of making our Fort Knox, though the girls we have left arent very keen as they are used to having half an acre to stroll around in. Still if its a choice between a pen and death, no contest.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: danfinn1 on June 22, 2010, 13:37
IMHO vermin should be trapped/hunted and destroyed, just like the country people have been doing for years. In this category I would include foxes, grey squirrels, magpies, rats, mice etc.

If a domestic dog  or cat causes damage then they are destroyed. Just like the earlier comments we would be helping nature, by reducing the numbers
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Thrift on July 03, 2010, 17:40
I agree vermin should be treated as vermin and destroyed when their numbers are too invasive. Lots of people see foxes as pretty and cute as indeed they are until you witness their savage nature and destruction.

I blame all these soppy wildlife programmes where they sentimentalise all animals ( except the human variety of course )

 >:( >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: DD. on July 03, 2010, 17:58

If a domestic dog  or cat causes damage then they are destroyed.

That's a new one on me!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: horticgirl on July 04, 2010, 15:08
Just reading this with interest - we have lost 3 birds in the last 2 months  :(
Poor Yvette was taken last monday morning just as it was starting to get light. We had our bedroom window and heard her squawking - horrific. husband got to the window just as the fox was disappearing through our back hedge.
He is going to re-build the hen house and make it like fort knox!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: John on July 04, 2010, 15:44
Please don't rely on chicken wire to protect your birds from foxes, they can and will bite through it. This article might help: Weldmesh (http://www.poultry.allotment-garden.org/Chicken_a/weldmesh-chicken-run.php)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Topscaff on July 06, 2010, 19:01
The best cure for foxes is a bit of lead behind its left ear no more trouble,  >:(
Mike.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: stujem on July 09, 2010, 15:50
Hi, I'm just building a chicken run and house (started yesterday) I'm looking to have just 3 chickens for now, one each for the children!. I have read every post regarding foxes and I'm sorry to everyone who has lost there girls and boys. I do not want this to happen to my girls so looking for advice please. I know I have foxes going in and out of my garden and I've also seen them crossing the road. Digging the ground to put wire mesh is not an option, so should I put wire mesh on the floor?, will the chickens be alright walking on mesh? I have made a house out of pallets, I will also attach wire mesh over the wood as well to make sure. Many thanks
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on July 09, 2010, 21:59
All around the outside of your run and coup make a weld mesh skirt that sites on the ground and is attached to your run at 90 degrees. Make it at lease 8 inches wide (ideally I would make it 12 inches wide) and peg it down with tent pegs. This will prevent anything from burrowing under.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: stujem on July 10, 2010, 16:53
Thank you Joyfull, I will do just as you said.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on July 10, 2010, 19:28
the thicker the weld mesh the better  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: stujem on July 11, 2010, 21:00
I've almost finsh my run and coop now, and am not going to use chicken wire only to go over the wooden panels of the coob (just in case) I would like to ask would Welded wire mesh 1" x 1" be ok or should I use 1/2" x 1/2" I look forward to any advice given.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on July 11, 2010, 21:27
1/2" x 1/2" is best as rats can get through the 1" holes.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: stujem on July 11, 2010, 22:48
Thank you joyfull for all your help. I have just looked at ebay and seen a 30m roll of gauge 19 welded wire mesh 1/2" x 1/2" x 36"  for £36.00 + £11.00 postage. I hope this will be ok. what do you think?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: joyfull on July 12, 2010, 16:06
The lower the gauge the thicker the wire (it is usually measured by thickness - i.e. SWG), ideally you should look at aound 14 or 16 gauge.
There is a company called Hills of Devon - they are on ebay but also have their own website - and they appear to be one of the best and quickest suppliers  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: magicfairy on July 16, 2010, 22:27
Hi, I am new to the forum and have a specific question about old mr foxy!  Sorry I haven't read through all the posts on this thread as there are rather a lot!

We have the hen house and are now clearing the overgrown area in our graden to accomodate the chooks.  The area is raised from the main garden, but still a fair size.  It is amongst a couple of large trees, so my question is do we put a roof on the run?  We live on the edge of wilderness, so foxy will definatley come prowling, but would an open topped run so the chooks can get up into the trees, if he did manage to get in, be better than an enclosed one?   

Thanks
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: sloegin on July 21, 2010, 20:11
What is it with foxes & chickens. Do they ever attack anything elese rabbits, cats etc? They are savages >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 21, 2010, 20:55
What is it with foxes & chickens. Do they ever attack anything elese rabbits, cats etc? They are savages >:(

Yep - they do attack all sorts of things. The children next-door to me lost their pet rabbit one night despite it being in a run.  :(

I lost a leather glove too - I dropped it on the way to my parents place just as I spotted a fox lurking in the shadows. The glove was gone when I retraced my steps 20 minutes later - it turned up chewed on the front lawn a day later!  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: John on July 21, 2010, 23:31
Foxes can attack cats but rarely do since a bite from a cat will inevitably be infected and most likely fatal. I've seen a small cat drive a fox from the garden, but she was a bit mad and would take on a dog on her patch :)
Sadly, the hungrier the fox, the more dangerous and we've a dreadful over-population problem with them in the towns. Although they live on our waste (like the rats) the problem is the strong dominate a territory pushing the weak into starvation.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 22, 2010, 04:30
I know many will disagree but I feel a little sorry for the fox in some ways..

I know they are very destructive of other creatures and can do a great deal of damage but they are simply following their instincts. It is our fault towns are becoming over run with them. Some people are soft enough to intentionally feed them while too many of us carelessly leave waste food around encouraging them to snatch opportune meals. Then us townies moan like mad about foxes being on the increase when they are simply making the best of each and every sneaky opportunity as we spread our housing estates further and further into country-side and onto what was once farmland where they lived.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: compostqueen on July 22, 2010, 16:46
You will need a roof on your run for sure.

My hens were attacked by a fox and lived to tell the tale thanks to my OH  :D  I have no ill will towards foxy but I am now paranoid about it's return so I've beefed up my defences and keep an eye on them when they're in the garden.  Foxes are beautiful creatures and like you say have to eat but I just wish they'd use the takeaway up the road  :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: garycogburn on August 15, 2010, 13:07
hi there. my enclosure has large loose stones around the outside, so if a fox digs, the stones will just fall on him. no probs yet, but like a fox marks his territory, you may have to do the same!! i heard this actually works, so i have tried it a few times. i also have laid a mesh inside the enclosure, so nothing can dig up from under, including rats. its buried about 6 inches under, then put sharp sand over mixed with earth. alot of hard work, but after loosing 10 ducks so far, i am determined to make them as safe as poss. i back on to a railway, so there are foxes all around. failing that, you can always pitch a tent next to your birds!!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: compostqueen on August 16, 2010, 08:53
good idea! 

My hen run is built on a wide concrete footing but I noticed when I shifted the Eglu that a mole (or maybe a rat) had tunnelled in and had tried to come up under the Eglu  :nowink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 16, 2010, 23:00
You will need a roof on your run for sure.

My hens were attacked by a fox and lived to tell the tale thanks to my OH  :D  I have no ill will towards foxy but I am now paranoid about it's return so I've beefed up my defences and keep an eye on them when they're in the garden.  Foxes are beautiful creatures and like you say have to eat but I just wish they'd use the takeaway up the road  :D

If the truth were known they probably do use the take-away and all the food that's dropped on the pavements... it may be what is attracting them to your area in the first place.

Unfortunately their instinct to chase anything that moves and has the right smell makes chickens and ducks irresistible.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: fluffy feather on August 19, 2010, 21:51
how deep will a fox dig to get in a run? i've buried wire a foot deep all around AND have planks at the base of the welded mesh sides. I've covered the run with wire too so the only way a fox could get in is underneath.

i have a row of concrete blocks under my wire and timber on top,that shld do the job.hopefully if mr fox comes to my run he will need to bring his jack hammer wif him lol
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Bonniebean on August 22, 2010, 19:20
Only speaking from experience having always had a fox visiting the garden (urban), I tried the male urine thing when I first got the chooks, always refreshing it regularly. I found that all that happened was that the fox did not urinate in the garden, just sniffed around, but he/she has always ignored the chicken run and seems to prefer dispatching any mice or rats we have had! I don't take anything for granted and my run is as secure as I can make it and they are always well in bed by the time he comes around.
It may also help that all houses around have dogs including us.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 23, 2010, 14:51
Bonniebean - I've a feeling that the foxes on my lottie site have done a good job at reducing the rat population and for that I am grateful (if I'm right). I just wish they'd spend less time cavorting through my crops.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Cal_Leghorn on November 01, 2010, 14:05
I lock my chickens up at 6:50pm to make sure they are all in and away from the gates so it does not attract foxes.I don't know if this helps but we wash down the area the chickens where the coop is every night to get the scent of our chickens away so the foxes don't come after Pinky,Perky and Punk-Face.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bastonjock on November 21, 2010, 13:13
my dogs went nuts a few nights ago,i was late getting home and the coops were open,i always take my dogs with me,it was dark and the two Schnauzers went ballistic and ran off into the dark with the old Lab X heading after them,im pretty sure that it was a fox as i heard some animal barking in the dark
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on November 22, 2010, 09:56
The other day OH let chickens and ducks into the field for a forage. He stood watching the whole time accompanied by our neighbour Ben, the collie pup.

After a while he sent Ben to round up the ducks and bring them back which he duly did. They were only yards away but in a flash a fox darted round the corner, behind Ben, going straight past and heading towards OH and the birds  :ohmy: He grabbed a duck from the middle of the group!

OH grabbed a stick and, roaring like a banshee, bashed at the fox until it let go   whereupon it departed. Poor Ben didn't know what happened and must have thought he'd done something terrible until he was sent in hot pursuit; he's only 7 months  ::)

Luckily the duck is fine.  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hayley'sHens on November 22, 2010, 10:13
A friend of mine lost 3 Indian runner ducks last night, Cunning Mr Fox removed bricks off the top of the coop and got in that way  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 22, 2010, 11:02
They are very cunning.
A friend of mine has just lost her two ducks that I found for her a few months ago and she is dreading how to tell her two young children  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 24, 2010, 02:00
They are very cunning.
A friend of mine has just lost her two ducks that I found for her a few months ago and she is dreading how to tell her two young children  :(

That's really sad - I wonder how long it will be before there are strong moves to reduce the population in and around towns?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 24, 2010, 06:40
not long ago foxes used to be caught in the west mids and then released in Wales (allegedly) so guess these moves have been around for a while. This method just moves the problem around and urban foxes who get fed by a lot of people or scavenge around bins face the problem of not being able to cope with finding their own food. My father in law makes dog food sandwiches for his local foxes and cannot understand when I tell him that he is making things worse for the foxes  :(, he just thinks it is because I have chickens and am worried about foxes getting them (luckily his foxes are 50 miles away from my birds).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 24, 2010, 15:57
Foxes are lovely in the distance, far away.... I'm just not so keen on housing them at the end of my plot when they decide to hold family parties in the middle of my seed beds or chew their way through my poly-covered cloches.

I've spent several weeks filling in the bits they have dug out under my wood pile  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on November 28, 2010, 01:27
There used to be a product called (something like) Renardine, I don't know if its still available, supposed to deter foxes. When we had a sniff at some we thought it smelled like Jeyes fluid. I wonder of a spray of (diluted) Jeyes would deter them?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on November 28, 2010, 10:16
Our friendly fox has revisited. A few nights ago I was riding down the lane on my electric scooter at about 9.45pm when something passed me about a yard away then stopped and waited. Sure enough it was Mr. Fox ..... he then loped off into the field.

Two days later he was back, sitting nonchalantly in the field a few yards from the gate, watching us watching him! This was 3.30pm and a touch too close to the hen yard. He retreated slightly but was soon back and ventured out of the gate despite a noisy farmer and Ben the collie giving the odd bark.

When OH threw a stone he ran halfway across the field and waited again until Ben turned up and set off in hot pursuit!

This fox is either very brave, very stupid or possibly a very tame town fox who has been trapped and released in the country.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 28, 2010, 10:16
There used to be a product called (something like) Renardine, I don't know if its still available, supposed to deter foxes. When we had a sniff at some we thought it smelled like Jeyes fluid. I wonder of a spray of (diluted) Jeyes would deter them?

Personnally I don't think it would be legal to spray foxes with Jays... then there's the problem of would they stand still long enough to let you... ::)

On and around the chicken run.... maybe.  :unsure:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 28, 2010, 10:18
Our friendly fox has revisited. A few nights ago I was riding down the lane on my electric scooter at about 9.45pm when something passed me about a yard away then stopped and waited. Sure enough it was Mr. Fox ..... he then loped off into the field.

Two days later he was back, sitting nonchalantly in the field a few yards from the gate, watching us watching him! This was 3.30pm and a touch too close to the hen yard. He retreated slightly but was soon back and ventured out of the gate despite a noisy farmer and Ben the collie giving the odd bark.

When OH threw a stone he ran halfway across the field and waited again until Ben turned up and set off in hot pursuit!

This fox is either very brave, very stupid or possibly a very tame town fox who has been trapped and released in the country.

Or perhaps just very hungry?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 28, 2010, 10:19
This fox is either very brave, very stupid or possibly a very tame town fox who has been trapped and released in the country.


He/she could also be very very hungry and after easy pickings.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 28, 2010, 10:19
snap!! Learner - great minds and all that  :lol: :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on November 28, 2010, 13:51
snap!! Learner - great minds and all that  :lol: :lol:

He may well be very hungry but is was in prime condition and certainly not undernourished.
Sometimes some of the younger ones have yet to encounter danger so have no fear though, a condition which will be remedied by the hunt!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 28, 2010, 14:04
please don't let this topic turn into a pro or anti hunt campaign.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on November 28, 2010, 16:48
I lost all my hens last year to a fox, he/she got in the run and couldnt get out, he was there, carcases all around, feathers everywhere, I introduced him/her to dustbin heaven, now the shotgun is ready (not loaded) I cant shoot them in the street, but if they come into the garden unintroduced, they get a black bag and an introduction to dustbin heaven

Many years ago, I lost my rabbits to a fox, ever since then, I have hated them, I have lost some really beautiful birds to these vermin, I'm not going to lose any more :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Aunt Sally on November 28, 2010, 17:11
You're a barrel of laughs dear  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 29, 2010, 00:11
You're a barrel of laughs dear  ;)

Should that be: "You're a barrel dustbin of laughs dear" ??  :blink:   
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on November 29, 2010, 01:13
There used to be a product called (something like) Renardine, I don't know if its still available, supposed to deter foxes. When we had a sniff at some we thought it smelled like Jeyes fluid. I wonder of a spray of (diluted) Jeyes would deter them?

Personnally I don't think it would be legal to spray foxes with Jays... then there's the problem of would they stand still long enough to let you... ::)

On and around the chicken run.... maybe.  :unsure:

I've never heard of it being ILLEGAL, but then again I don't think I could run fast enough to get it on the fox.  :)
I seem to remember being told rags soaked in the stuff and tied in strategic places would deter most vermin (including moles I think, by putting the rags in the runs)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on November 29, 2010, 02:26
If it were me I'd probably try just about anything.... and keep it rather quiet  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on November 29, 2010, 07:47
Our friendly fox has revisited. A few nights ago I was riding down the lane on my electric scooter at about 9.45pm when something passed me about a yard away then stopped and waited. Sure enough it was Mr. Fox ..... he then loped off into the field.

Two days later he was back, sitting nonchalantly in the field a few yards from the gate, watching us watching him! This was 3.30pm and a touch too close to the hen yard. He retreated slightly but was soon back and ventured out of the gate despite a noisy farmer and Ben the collie giving the odd bark.

When OH threw a stone he ran halfway across the field and waited again until Ben turned up and set off in hot pursuit!

This fox is either very brave, very stupid or possibly a very tame town fox who has been trapped and released in the country.

if i were in your situation i would put some snares or a live catch trap out if you know someone who can shoot it, as otherwise it will get bolder and bolder.

Those were my first thoughts tomshooter ....... I'll have to find a local trapper/shooter and Joyfull, I have no intention of starting a hunting debate. I would rather sit and watch the snow melt! ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 01, 2010, 00:37
Mr fox checked us out last night, his tracks showed where he had double checked the hen hut.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on December 01, 2010, 07:06
make sure he cant chew through the coop - wire mesh stapled around the corners and underneath should help deter.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 01, 2010, 23:35
make sure he cant chew through the coop - wire mesh stapled around the corners and underneath should help deter.
thanks - good idea, I'll see what I can do tomorrow
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: min200 on December 02, 2010, 12:42
Weve been checked out again as well.  Nice set of tracks around the coop but not cunning enough to get in...again...thankfully!

At least it was just one set of prints as well which is better than the 3 sets we had earlier this year!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 02, 2010, 23:20
Weve been checked out again as well.  Nice set of tracks around the coop but not cunning enough to get in...again...thankfully!

At least it was just one set of prints as well which is better than the 3 sets we had earlier this year!


It certainly makes me make extra checks when shutting everyone in, there have been times when I've got to bed, for some reason it's then I can't remember shutting a certain door, sometimes I've been right to get up and check.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on December 05, 2010, 00:39
Snow certainly does show where the foxes have been.... Three in the front garden the other night and two wandering around in broad daylight yesterday. Flipping cheek... they could at least pretend to be nervous!!  >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: compostqueen on December 05, 2010, 19:33
I've followed suspicious tracks in my garden which led to an area where the privet (hugely overgrown) had bowed low to the ground with the weight of the snow and under there is where foxy has been taking his kills. All that remained were some brightly covered feathers.  There were tracks everywhere so he's very mobile

My brother in law was up with the larks this morning and he says he saw two leaping up and down as if fighting (or playing) with each other. This is on the main road by a school
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hayley'sHens on December 06, 2010, 09:40
Something, Im guessing a fox got into my duck house last night / early this morning. I've lost 5 in total. 3 were a mess, 1 dead but no visable signs of attack (defended up my big unlucky drakes, Sorry again Cara) and 1 gone, no body  >:( :( :( It was awful and something I never want to go through again.

Thankfully my others had gone into the chicken shed last night, And thats where they will contuine to go until the weather gets warmer and attacks fewer. It is really silly to ask, Will whatever it was come back? Im guessing it will now it found a food source in my garden  :( :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on December 06, 2010, 09:48
That is such a horrible experience; I feel so sorry for you.  :(

The answer is yes, that was almost certainly a fox who will definitely be back and will probably not wait until night time. In these weather conditions they can strike at 10am.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on December 06, 2010, 18:01
Hayley, Cara told me this morning - she's really upset for you as you know. I'm afraid foxes are cunning and around everywhere, possibly worse in the town than country.
That is such a horrible experience; I feel so sorry for you.  :(

The answer is yes, that was almost certainly a fox who will definitely be back and will probably not wait until night time. In these weather conditions they can strike at 10am.

Thrift is 100% right.


Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hayley'sHens on December 06, 2010, 18:26
Cara was fantastic this morning, Even offered to come over and help me sort out.

Hayley, Cara told me this morning - she's really upset for you as you know. I'm afraid foxes are cunning and around everywhere, possibly worse in the town than country.
That is such a horrible experience; I feel so sorry for you.  :(

The answer is yes, that was almost certainly a fox who will definitely be back and will probably not wait until night time. In these weather conditions they can strike at 10am.

Thrift is 100% right.




 :( :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 08, 2010, 01:55
Sorry to hear about the attack, it's a horrible thing to find.
Since I saw tracks round my place, I've got all my lot going in one hut instead of four, there is just about enough room, they may not be over happy but at least they should be safer in that hut, and the ducks all in together as well, the drakes will just have to sort their pecking order out.
as I try to be about at dusk and before, and make sure everything is in the actual huts rather than runs, I hope foxy doesn't bother checking us out too often, since seeing the tracks once I haven't seen them since, hopefully it's too much bother jumping fences and walls for no result.
stoats, mink and sometimes weasels are worse, they are around all day and can be in and out or under a hut before you realise there is a problem.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on December 08, 2010, 08:25
Hayley, Cara told me this morning - she's really upset for you as you know. I'm afraid foxes are cunning and around everywhere, possibly worse in the town than country.
That is such a horrible experience; I feel so sorry for you.  :(

The answer is yes, that was almost certainly a fox who will definitely be back and will probably not wait until night time. In these weather conditions they can strike at 10am.

Thrift is 100% right.

I'm afraid I was right. Early yesterday afternoon there was a commotion and a missing duck. Unfortunately, because we want to allow access to the stream, it is nearly impossible to securely fence every area so there is an element of 'chance'.

Usually though, when a fox attacks there are some feathers as evidence ...... this time nothing. I wonder was it a stoat?



Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 08, 2010, 11:44
If you are near a water course (or even not so near sometimes :( ) it could easily be mink. lost most of my calls to mink earlier this year. no trace. it was only when I caught one in a trap we realised what we'd got. we are probably about 200yd from the stream.
Is it possible to keep them nearer the pen at least till the weather breaks, unless there is someone around?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on December 08, 2010, 14:18
Yes Pen we are keeping them in at the moment, they are having a little outing only under supervision. I think you may very well be right about mink even though there are so many foxes around. It's the lack of feathers makes me suspicious.

Today the fox count is four so far. A very handsome dog fox was patrolling our boundary at about 9.15am then I went out for a scooter ride and spotted one in a field; on the way home a little vixen was walking along the lane towards me. I stopped, we both stared at each other then she continued walking! As she passed I spoke, she stopped and surveyed me as I chatted to her then continued strolling along. She looked quite well filled out. Just saw another over the field.

 Why don't they feast on rabbit, there are plenty around.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on December 08, 2010, 14:40
they do but chickens and ducks are easier to catch than rabbits  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hayley'sHens on December 08, 2010, 14:43
they do but chickens and ducks are easier to catch than rabbits  :(

 :( :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on December 08, 2010, 15:14
Foxes do not miss a chance.
I was night fishing a local beach and the angler next to me was going down the beach following the tide as it ebbed. He left his rod to go back to his base camp at the high water mark for a sandwich and his sandwiches had vanished.
When he returned to his rod the 3lb bass he had left by his rod rest had been nicked too. :)

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on December 08, 2010, 16:03
 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: chickpee123 on December 10, 2010, 16:43
There are lots of fox's here 2
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on December 10, 2010, 17:06
Fox fur farming anyone?

Calm down, dear, it was a joke in poor taste I know. :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Abacus on December 16, 2010, 23:31
We had a fox come down the back of our garden every night (fortunately my girls are all in an enclosed run and locked in the hen house every dusk) but it was attacking the wire netting and trying a bit of breaking and entering, Fitted one of those solar powered garden lights above the hen run and haven't had any problems since (fingers crossed)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 17, 2010, 22:24
There was something on Gardeners Question Time today about discouraging foxes in gardens, something about habit. must try and listen on Sunday
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: sion01 on December 20, 2010, 11:56
A fox had dug a hole by the door to the chicken coop this morning.This cold weather must be making them desperate.I read somewhere that lion poo stops foxes coming into the garden .You can buy it mail order
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on December 20, 2010, 21:37
A fox had dug a hole by the door to the chicken coop this morning.This cold weather must be making them desperate.I read somewhere that lion poo stops foxes coming into the garden .You can buy it mail order

Are you sure you don't need the lion too?  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: sion01 on December 27, 2010, 15:00
yes a lion would keep you well supplied with poo and collecting eggs would be very exciting :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on December 27, 2010, 19:07
yes a lion would keep you well supplied with poo and collecting eggs would be very exciting :D

They once had little ones on the eggs you know  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on December 29, 2010, 18:01
OH nearly knocked a young fox down at about 4 today by St Mary's Secondary in Newbold Chesterfield, it just stood there looking at him.  He's seen this one several times in the past month around the same spot.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: SocksOn on January 09, 2011, 12:12
Hi

What evidence can you see if a fox has been in your garden compared to that of a cat?

We know there are foxes about as during the snow we saw them playing in next doors garden but we've not seen them in ours, we found tracks but not sure if they were cats or foxes as led away from the chickens.

thank you
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 09, 2011, 12:17
if it is snowy or muddy you will be able to tell the difference in their footprints, this website might help you:-

http://www.ussartf.org/animal_tracking.htm

Also the scent of a fox is really strong - one of my dogs has to roll wherever a dog or mink has wee'd and they are even worse if there is a pooh!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: SocksOn on January 09, 2011, 12:29
Thank you will have a look.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on January 09, 2011, 13:41
Hi

What evidence can you see if a fox has been in your garden compared to that of a cat?

We know there are foxes about as during the snow we saw them playing in next doors garden but we've not seen them in ours, we found tracks but not sure if they were cats or foxes as led away from the chickens.

thank you

If you have seen them in next doors garden and you have hens they will definately have been in for a look .
Clever,sly, sharp, opportunistic and very fond of a chicken dinner.
Do not give them the chance.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pekinpete on January 09, 2011, 20:16
hi ,new to site so it get it right had trouble a couple of years ago but since putting in new fence and light sensor hopfully no probs my trouble is of the two legged type
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on January 09, 2011, 20:49
hi ,new to site so it get it right had trouble a couple of years ago but since putting in new fence and light sensor hopfully no probs my trouble is of the two legged type

Welcome to the site. 2 legged rats are much harder to deal with than 4 legged, sadly. Use of a shotgun is really frowned upon :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: angelavdavis on January 09, 2011, 23:28
Lost my old chook on Saturday to Foxy loxy.

Sadly, we were called away to visit a sick relative in hospital on Saturday morning. 

I had one chook, five years old and almost blind who we kept separate from the others as she didn't stand a chance at getting food when housed with them.  Her house doesn't have a run so she was free ranging.  We got back at 7pm to find her beheaded in the garden.  It was the first time we haven't been home to shut the hens in at dusk in three years.

Very upsetting.  I would have felt better if he had taken her for his dinner, but to see her simply killed, beheaded and discarded was annoying. 

Luckily the other girls were asleep in their house (lucky because their run and house was still open.  Just counting our blessings we only had one body to dispose of.

I spent the day in the garden with the other girls today and they were all really very very quiet so clearly traumatised by whatever they heard last night.  Poor things.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 10, 2011, 07:23
so sorry  :( hugs xx
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 10, 2011, 08:18
A friend nearby was mixing up food for their pet labrador, who was patiently waiting outside the back door, when he was aware of something beside him in the kitchen. It was a fox! :ohmy:

 He said he didn't know whether to kick it or what, but in the end gave it some dog food which it ate alongside the lab. This is miles out in the country so not an urban fox. There are three children under six in that house so he needs to be very careful.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on January 10, 2011, 08:59
A friend nearby was mixing up food for their pet labrador, who was patiently waiting outside the back door, when he was aware of something beside him in the kitchen. It was a fox! :ohmy:

 He said he didn't know whether to kick it or what, but in the end gave it some dog food which it ate alongside the lab. This is miles out in the country so not an urban fox. There are three children under six in that house so he needs to be very careful.

Sounds like someone is missing a pet fox who knows what the sound of a food bowl rattling means. :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 10, 2011, 14:41
I've met three lately that will stay close to the car when you stop. I've talked to them and they display no fear whatsoever. Maybe people have been feeding them?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 10, 2011, 16:27
I really wish people would stop feeding them and encouraging them into back gardens >:(

They're not pets, they're wild animals and should be left to be wild >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 10, 2011, 17:03
I really wish people would stop feeding them and encouraging them into back gardens >:(

They're not pets, they're wild animals and should be left to be wild >:( >:( >:(

And that includes staying off of my plot... You think they're wild?!
I'm furious  :mad:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 10, 2011, 17:30
 ::) :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pekinpete on January 11, 2011, 11:38
having like a lot of members i have also seen result of fox attack it seems that they go in to a blood lust and just kill,hope this wont upset members but when we still had hunting had no trouble now see them any time of the day,only thing that seems to work for me is a pair of parsons jack russells they seem to smell a fox since having them no problems(touch wood)have also put up electric fence for night time
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 11, 2011, 11:41
fox hunting killed very few foxes, most were and still are killed by cars. Sadly people feed foxes (my father in law for one  :mad:) and others catch them then release them elsewhere  :mad:.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Charlie's Chickens on January 11, 2011, 13:42
Our neighbour lost 8 of his 9 ducks last night  :(

2 bodies missing the others just left and the 1 remaining duck cowering in the corner...so sad.

I now feel sick as I have 6 gorgeous chooks and I am dreading going home in case it's returned.  I feel awful as mine were out creating Sunday night at around 5pm, which is very unusual for them, so I guess it must have been sniffing around....I didn't put 2 & 2 together and warn my neighbour  :(

My husband is now on strict orders to regularly 'wee' round the chicken run in the hope this might deter it enough to go and look eleswhere for desert!!!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 11, 2011, 13:47
sadly whilst this may be a deterrent it is not guaranteed to work and hungry foxes can strike anytime of the day or night - we just have to balance whether we want completely free ranging or protected by electric fencing or secure run .
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 11, 2011, 14:29
fox hunting killed very few foxes, most were and still are killed by cars. Sadly people feed foxes (my father in law for one  :mad:) and others catch them then release them elsewhere  :mad:.

True that hunts kill very few foxes and as a control it wasn't that significant however the hunts activities did tend to reduce the local hotspots and help distribute them more evenly as well as teach them a healthy respect for people a trait urban foxes don't share.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 11, 2011, 14:35
hunting still takes place not too far from here and is legal so long as you go out with a bird of prey, local traditions are kept alive.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 11, 2011, 14:50
hunting still takes place not too far from here and is legal so long as you go out with a bird of prey, local traditions are kept alive.

Yes we still get two or three local hunts, the Oakley, Enfield Chase and the Cambridgeshire.  There was a rather amusing incident last year when we watched the hunt crossing the fields next to our fields and chasing a fox up onto the oposite hill where they must have lost its scent as slinking along the hedgerow heading back was the fox who crossed the fiels at the side of us and disappeared into the hedge.  He was a bit too quick for me as I grabbed my camera and all I got was his tail just visible disappearing into the hedge.
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 11, 2011, 15:14
fox hunting killed very few foxes, most were and still are killed by cars. Sadly people feed foxes (my father in law for one  :mad:) and others catch them then release them elsewhere  :mad:.

True that hunts kill very few foxes and as a control it wasn't that significant however the hunts activities did tend to reduce the local hotspots and help distribute them more evenly as well as teach them a healthy respect for people a trait urban foxes don't share.

HF

In total agreement with both. I have just learned that our hunt is out next week and is sure to visit our hotspot. It is not banned here so we get the real thing and maybe all our 'pet foxes' will stop being so complacent and realise there is some danger in the world.  ::)



Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 11, 2011, 15:34
fox hunting killed very few foxes, most were and still are killed by cars.

Almost worth taking driving lessons  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on January 11, 2011, 15:35
why do you think we drive lorries - far more wheels  ;)  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 11, 2011, 15:36
why do you think we drive lorries - far more wheels  ;)  :lol:

I might consider a tram in that case!  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 11, 2011, 16:05
A well aimed bike could do some damage (probably to the rider too ... so maybe not)  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hayley'sHens on January 11, 2011, 16:35
I wont be slowing down for them to get out of my way anymore  :mad:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 11, 2011, 16:50
I blame these animal welfare programmes for the increase in garden foxes >:( 

Yes, I know urban foxes have been a pest thanks to overfilled bins and food litter for years however being encouraged to put food out for foxes and badgers in the garden is ridiculous >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 11, 2011, 16:56
A well aimed bike could do some damage (probably to the rider too ... so maybe not)  ;)

So, the other evening when I was cycling home at 11pm, I may have made the right decision to go around the fox that wouldn't move out of the way for me?

The dozy thing just stood there and even when I shooed it there was no effort to move much.  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 11, 2011, 16:59
No fear of humans >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 11, 2011, 17:16
I agree with Evie, the wildlife programmes have a lot to answer for! They completely sentimentalise all wild animals in a way that David Attenborough never did. Admittedly a lot of them are very pretty and attractive creatures but let's not get carried away. They are vermin.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 12, 2011, 00:53
A well aimed bike could do some damage (probably to the rider too ... so maybe not)  ;)

So, the other evening when I was cycling home at 11pm, I may have made the right decision to go around the fox that wouldn't move out of the way for me?

The dozy thing just stood there and even when I shooed it there was no effort to move much.  :blink:
That is actually quite scary, I dread rabies getting into the country
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 12, 2011, 00:59
Hi

What evidence can you see if a fox has been in your garden compared to that of a cat?

We know there are foxes about as during the snow we saw them playing in next doors garden but we've not seen them in ours, we found tracks but not sure if they were cats or foxes as led away from the chickens.
thank you
A fox track is usually more or less a single line of prints, ie not left and right, some cats do walk like that so you would have to go by size, but beware when snow is melting as they look bigger.
it could still have been a fox, checking out and moving on.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 12, 2011, 08:48
My personal opinion is, don't wait to see evidence of a fox, believe it's there and take as many precautions as you can to protect your chickens.

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on January 13, 2011, 11:11
I had an email from a smallholder who contended that country foxes actually do good by keeping down the rats (few cats will go for a rat, btw) and that shooting / hunting them was a waste of time as when you killed one, another would take its place. So her answer is that the vulnerable hens and ducks must be fenced in properly or else.

It makes a lot of sense to me.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on January 13, 2011, 13:16
I had an email from a smallholder who contended that country foxes actually do good by keeping down the rats (few cats will go for a rat, btw) and that shooting / hunting them was a waste of time as when you killed one, another would take its place. So her answer is that the vulnerable hens and ducks must be fenced in properly or else.

It makes a lot of sense to me.

And it is a waste of time pulling out weeds but it still has to be done. :) It helps if the neighbouring plots do it too.
A rifle bullet is better than disease and starvation.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 13, 2011, 15:09
I had an email from a smallholder who contended that country foxes actually do good by keeping down the rats (few cats will go for a rat, btw) and that shooting / hunting them was a waste of time as when you killed one, another would take its place. So her answer is that the vulnerable hens and ducks must be fenced in properly or else.

It makes a lot of sense to me.

Yes, makes sense to me too. They will always be around so if we want to keep poultry we have to make sure Mr. Fox can only gaze longingly at his potential supper!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 14, 2011, 00:22
I still think it helps if the numbers are kept down, then natures larder may supply more of the diet.
if I got some new hens I may consider keeping them penned, but I love to see them wandering, besides, if a mink managed to get in, they wouldn't stand a chance, looks like free range wins (for now)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: rowlandwells on January 20, 2011, 16:30
i know foxes are a real problem to poultry keepers and of-cause  farmers will be getting concerned as it gets near lambing time but nowadays farmers tend to either keep the flock near the farm or in lambing sheds

its difficult to put an answer to this topic i suppose one should try to make there chicken runs safe or fox proof as possible obviously foxes are more daring to seek food as food becomes in short supply i seen quite a large fox the other night when driving home the fox had a pheasant in its mouth
and unbeliever's to the oncoming traffic i have seen a fox on numerous occasion at the brewery where i work around six-o-clock every morning the fox walked past me on the  pathway only separated by a metal fence unperturbed of both my colleague and i talking 
 
being a country boy foxes have always been part of our country life although nature does seem to be cruel sometimes and no one likes to see any animal killed just for the sake of it so keep foxy at bay and be vigilant
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Matisse on January 23, 2011, 14:37
Not sure if this is true, but notlong ago I read in the Guardian newspapers that 'Curry powder ;)' works wonders to deter fox, they apparently dont like the smell!   ;)  I certainly will try it!. Also, another colleague suggested to buy: Lion poo! He said they sell  it in Zoos, and 'any' cat, dog or similar will be scare of going nearby. (Amazon sales 'Silent Roar Lion Manure' which apparently works too).

Just somethings interesting to consider. one of the farmers nearby had problems with Foxes in the past 2 months, and I've been worried about my chickens (they are free range) and locking them at night... I'll try the curry powder and hope for the best...

M

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on January 23, 2011, 19:53
Good luck with the curry powder - however, I'll trust to weldmesh and locking Mr Fox out. If the curry powder doesn't work it's a horrible way to find out.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 23, 2011, 20:17
Good luck with the curry powder - however, I'll trust to weldmesh and locking Mr Fox out. If the curry powder doesn't work it's a horrible way to find out.

I must say I'm very sceptical too.  If it were this simple we'd all have heard about.  The only thing I've found curry powder works well for is the Friday night chicken vindaloo :D
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on January 24, 2011, 21:02
Llamas, foxes don't like their smell, apparently  ??? ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 24, 2011, 23:36
Llamas, foxes don't like their smell, apparently  ??? ::)

So Llama curry really should do the business then ;)
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on January 24, 2011, 23:52
Llamas, foxes don't like their smell, apparently  ??? ::)

So Llama curry really should do the business then ;)
HF

You've a dry sense of humour :)

As I understand it, llamas attack the fox although I've only heard of them being kept with sheep as sort of guard dogs.

Seriously now, we're all looking for easy solutions but the fact is that the most reliable way to keep foxes off is to securely fence them out. If you want to rely on some hearsay report that XYZ will deter them, then that's your choice but it's too late to find something doesn't work when you're facing a dead flock.

People used to say bags of human hair or male peeing around the boundary kept them off - well urban foxes are no longer scared of people and those people who transport urban foxes to the countryside mean that country foxes are getting braver.

Incidentally, I think releasing urban foxes into the countryside is pretty cruel to the fox -  They haven't a clue how to survive and are condemned to a lingering starving death. 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 25, 2011, 01:53
Incidentally, I think releasing urban foxes into the countryside is pretty cruel to the fox -  They haven't a clue how to survive and are condemned to a lingering starving death.  

so how do we get this message across the 'animal lovers' john?  :unsure:
they are probably the same ones who kindly released murdering mink to slaughter our pets,  :mad: at least round here foxes are only usually about at night, the mink almost wiped my ducks out during the day. :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 25, 2011, 13:11
Well I tried the local Star of India and they were unable to help with recycled Llama Curry  seems it wasn't a hit with the customers and they kept spitting it out.  However they did suggest Ostrich Curry which is supposed to carry quite a kick.

I had more success with the local hunt who said that hunting with Llamas was possibly a loophole they could exploit.  However they were less confident about Ostrich as they thought it would be easier to carry hawks on their arms.

Misguided animal lovers could readily be kept in check by hunting with man eating tigers. :wacko:

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on January 25, 2011, 23:38
so how do we get this message across the 'animal lovers' john?  :unsure:
they are probably the same ones who kindly released murdering mink to slaughter our pets,  :mad: at least round here foxes are only usually about at night, the mink almost wiped my ducks out during the day. :(

I'm afraid those who released the mink from the cruelty of man were completely oblivious to their own cruelty to the eco-system and caused more harm to more animals than any fur farmer. The sad thing is they could have done so much good with those energies explaining about battery farming to the public.

As for the urban fox rescuers - I applaud their intentions but think they're misguided. I think the answer is to look at sterilising the females - I think they can do it quite easily with drugs nowadays - although I may be wrong.

As for country foxes, well they have their place in the eco-system too. It's our responsibility to protect our livestock and pets. After all, we don't cull potential burglars, we lock our doors. Hope I'm making sense here.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: compostqueen on January 25, 2011, 23:51
Fox attacks have been stepped up round me and I was talking to a chap yesterday that lost 15 in one go. He said the fox had buried the bodies of his hens. My friend has lost six and she said she never heard a sound  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on January 26, 2011, 07:08

As for the urban fox rescuers - I applaud their intentions but think they're misguided. I think the answer is to look at sterilising the females - I think they can do it quite easily with drugs nowadays - although I may be wrong.

I have often thought that might be possible in control of rats or rabbits. Surely in this advanced age it would be relatively easy to make them infertile.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 26, 2011, 16:19
so how do we get this message across the 'animal lovers' john?  :unsure:
they are probably the same ones who kindly released murdering mink to slaughter our pets,  :mad: at least round here foxes are only usually about at night, the mink almost wiped my ducks out during the day. :(

I'm afraid those who released the mink from the cruelty of man were completely oblivious to their own cruelty to the eco-system and caused more harm to more animals than any fur farmer. The sad thing is they could have done so much good with those energies explaining about battery farming to the public.

As for the urban fox rescuers - I applaud their intentions but think they're misguided. I think the answer is to look at sterilising the females - I think they can do it quite easily with drugs nowadays - although I may be wrong.

As for country foxes, well they have their place in the eco-system too. It's our responsibility to protect our livestock and pets. After all, we don't cull potential burglars, we lock our doors. Hope I'm making sense here.

Cull burglars.... now there's a thought but I seem to remember the chap who tried it got into dreadful trouble. In the good old USA things may be different. I'm not sure I'd want to move though.  ???
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 26, 2011, 23:54
As for country foxes, well they have their place in the eco-system too. It's our responsibility to protect our livestock and pets. After all, we don't cull potential burglars, we lock our doors. Hope I'm making sense here.

I would agree regarding rural foxes, one was about the other night as I walked the dog, as long as everyone's shut in it's a concern but not TOO worrying.
However regarding culling burglars, now that would be tempting :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 28, 2011, 11:01

I would agree regarding rural foxes, one was about the other night as I walked the dog, as long as everyone's shut in it's a concern but not TOO worrying.

However regarding culling burglars, now that would be tempting :blink:

What a shame foxes can't be trained to go after them!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 29, 2011, 01:14
interesting images coming to mind :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on January 29, 2011, 20:15
interesting images coming to mind :)

Foxes dressed in red?   Brings a new meaning to the notion of fox hunts!!  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on January 29, 2011, 21:15
interesting images coming to mind :)

Foxes dressed in red?   Brings a new meaning to the notion of fox hunts!!  :lol:

 :lol: :lol: :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: BML on January 30, 2011, 19:01
I am in the process of building a Hen House and run and I have run 13mm wire netting along the ground under the Hen House tacking it up a couple of inches above the ground line to the Hen House.  I have done the same with the run which has 13mm wire netting running along the ground with a covering of gravel.  The 13mm wire mesh is held down with a foundation of concrete blocks with the wire netting folded over with the frame work of the run covered with the same 13mm wire netting including the roof sitting on top of that so I hope that is Fox proof.
Is one alowed to set Fox Snares now days?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on January 30, 2011, 21:13
I am in the process of building a Hen House and run and I have run 13mm wire netting along the ground under the Hen House tacking it up a couple of inches above the ground line to the Hen House.  I have done the same with the run which has 13mm wire netting running along the ground with a covering of gravel.  The 13mm wire mesh is held down with a foundation of concrete blocks with the wire netting folded over with the frame work of the run covered with the same 13mm wire netting including the roof sitting on top of that so I hope that is Fox proof.
Is one alowed to set Fox Snares now days?

When you say wire netting do you mean weld mesh made from crossing wire strands at right angles which are welded at the crossing points which if made from 19swg wire are generally regarded as fox proof?   Or do you mean what is often called chicken wire netting which is made by twisting parallel strands together at intervals forming a sort of hexagonal mesh which is not fox proof since the twists can be untwisted by a fox chewing the fence.   If the latter you are probably wasting your efforts.

Generally a fox proof fence requires a 6 foot high weld mesh protected against a fox climbing it with an electric strand 2/3rds the way up or with an 18inch outward overhang and either protected against digging with an electrified strand at ground level 9inches or so about 18inchs outside the net or burried 18inches deep or bent out 18inches and weighed down with flagstones.

The alternative to having a high fence is a totally enclosed mesh aviary type enclosure.

Another option is a 4 foot electric net (not fence).

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: trencherpilot on April 27, 2011, 16:31
I know it isn't the pc way of detering foxes, but I have the ultimate deterrant. A shotgun!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on April 27, 2011, 17:15
Sorry but they are not suitable for most backyard chicken keepers. Most do not have shotguns or the licence to hold one also they should not be used in close proximity to dwellings.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bastonjock on May 15, 2011, 23:29
I found the foxes den,it took a while but you can sometimes catch a whifff of the fox,anyhow ive taken to walking my dogs down there most nights,a few times they have flushed the fox and had her legging it,she is too quick for them.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on May 16, 2011, 08:35
Quite a few foxes lurking at the moment but Ben, our neighbour's collie who is just 12months now is doing a good job.

He comes and minds the hens while they have their field outings and has now learned to sniff out a prowler and give chase. Earns his biccies  :)  he's a clever chap!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: chandy on May 16, 2011, 11:10
Only had the chickens a month a one been taken by three young foxes this morning. Preparing myself to tell children this evening.

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on May 16, 2011, 11:24
not just foxes - recently we had a mink attack and 10 taken so please be on guard and always lock them up at night.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Spana on May 16, 2011, 17:56
Most of mine are shut in every night but a few hens and 2 Guinea fowl roost in one of the cattle barns.

Just after mid-night last night there was a right commotion.  I dashed out with a torch to find 1 guinea hiding in a corner, the other gone. 

 Had a look round this morning and found a pile of Guinea feathers at the end of the cattle yard by the electric poultry netting.  A fox i think had obviously had a struggle jumping the netting with the guinea in his mouth.  Felt really sad as i like my Guineas  :(

Couple of hours latter I was out doing the drinkers when something across the fields caught my eye.  I could hardly believe it but  there he was, coming home :happy:

I dont really know what happened and can only make a guess. He doesn't look to bad but they have both been very quiet and subdued all day.

 One very lucky Guinea Fowl :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: broodyhen on May 18, 2011, 20:55
^ thats a lovely story  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: OpiumEater on May 24, 2011, 20:04
Only had the chickens a month a one been taken by three young foxes this morning. Preparing myself to tell children this evening.



We lost one this morning, unfortunately the children were having breakfast at the time and heard and saw all the commotion. Sobbing and wailing followed, but all calm now.

Poor Dorcus  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on May 24, 2011, 21:27
No, that's awful, poor Dorcus :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on May 25, 2011, 01:21
My daughter arrived back from Ireland complete with pet rabbit.  ::)

New hutch bought (good old dad). Now I lay awake two floors up keeping an ear open for trouble. Two nights ago woken by heck of a banging sound!!!

Hutch has suspended marine-ply floor and Bunny was drumming like the 1812 overture.
Belted down-stairs (2 sets... heart rate up at my age  ::)) to discover.. no fox but next-door's cat appearing from under the draped cover.

I said some very rude words. Heaven help next-door if they complain about the thumping / banging noises from the rabbit!  >:(

At least it wasn't the local crowd of foxes.  :ohmy:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on May 25, 2011, 09:19
My daughter arrived back from Ireland complete with pet rabbit.  ::)

New hutch bought (good old dad). Now I lay awake two floors up keeping an ear open for trouble. Two nights ago woken by heck of a banging sound!!!

Hutch has suspended marine-ply floor and Bunny was drumming like the 1812 overture.
Belted down-stairs (2 sets... heart rate up at my age  ::)) to discover.. no fox but next-door's cat appearing from under the draped cover.

I said some very rude words. Heaven help next-door if they complain about the thumping / banging noises from the rabbit!  >:(

Great alarm system, I remember that tune from when our girls were young and had lop eared rabbits.   :D

At least it wasn't the local crowd of foxes.  :ohmy:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on May 25, 2011, 15:47
My daughter arrived back from Ireland complete with pet rabbit.  ::)

Great alarm system, I remember that tune from when our girls were young and had lop eared rabbits.   :D

To add insult to injury...(as it were)... the rabbit had a long sleep in the next morning while I wandered around feeling whacked having lost a couple of hours sleep.  ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on May 25, 2011, 17:42
I know how you feel Learner, our rabbits belong to our daughter, she sleeps at the front of  the house, we sleep at the back and where are the rabbits? UNDER MY FLIPPIN WINDOW >:( 4am this morning :mad:

Calm now :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on May 25, 2011, 23:42
I know how you feel Learner, our rabbits belong to our daughter, she sleeps at the front of  the house, we sleep at the back and where are the rabbits? UNDER MY FLIPPIN WINDOW >:( 4am this morning :mad:

Calm now :D

Same here... were at the back 2 flights up while little-miss-rabbit-owner snores at the front (if you see what I mean)  :blink:

Foxes live opposite in a wonderfully wild & overgrown garden. Great  :(

Considering fixing up an outside light with PIR just above the hutch so I can look out of the window rather than have to get up and rush down every time "bunny" decides the create thunder.  :mellow:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: DonnaM on June 02, 2011, 11:07
We have recently had our chickens taken in the daytime, they are locked up every night and yes it is the fox, we have seen it in the woods waiting for its chance and heard one being carried off at 11am  >:(  We have a humane fox trap and friends and neighbours with shotguns but as we have four cats I think it will be more of a cat trap than a fox trap really  ::)
Thinking of getting the electric chicken fencing as we already have a mains unit but was wondering if anyone know how the netting does not earth it out as it touches the floor/ground/grass? And most importantly, does it work?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on June 03, 2011, 12:45
We have recently had our chickens taken in the daytime, they are locked up every night and yes it is the fox, we have seen it in the woods waiting for its chance and heard one being carried off at 11am  >:(  We have a humane fox trap and friends and neighbours with shotguns but as we have four cats I think it will be more of a cat trap than a fox trap really  ::)
Thinking of getting the electric chicken fencing as we already have a mains unit but was wondering if anyone know how the netting does not earth it out as it touches the floor/ground/grass? And most importantly, does it work?

Yes it certainly works.  There's lots of advice on the site on how to install it just search the stickies area.  The key to not shorting it out is to ensure the sides are dead straight and the net taut.  Use treestakes as corner posts and guy rope the insulated posts off these.  Trying to use teh insulation posts guyed to the ground to keep the net taut doesn't work and it will sag but a well hammered in tree stake to guy to does the job.  a 1.22metre high fence is best bait it with abit of bacon wrapped round it and the fox will get a nice shock and after this he won'y come near again.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on June 05, 2011, 14:02
We've foxes galore around here so everyone knows to be careful. However, the other day we had a dog problem. We get a lot of walkers coming by, many of them holidaymakers - which is fine - so suspect one of them as the locals know better in a sheep area. Blasted thing got into next door's field and killed the young rhea, the older birds fled onto the road. Further up the track it got a couple of hens and injured a lamb. We know it was a dog, rheas are too big for a fox.
The farmer who has the sheep on our field got the surviving rheas back into the field. If he sees the dog it will be a shotgun job. Sadly the law doesn't allow shooting the owner. I just can't understand the owner - don't they realise?  :mad:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 05, 2011, 18:41
The owners ought to be held accountable - criminal damage!  >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on June 05, 2011, 22:19
Today two young men went up the track with a lurcher, ignored the sign someone has put up about keeping dogs on a lead and the lurcher rushed off to chase some of the lambs up there.
They'd gone by the time the owner got down. I can see potential for a very nasty incident here. We don't know it was their dog the other day, but the suspicion is there. The owner of the rheas was away when it happened, she's devastated at losing her 'baby' The older birds are still very skitty so she was putting up electric fencing to stop them escaping.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 05, 2011, 22:26
Did you see the people with the lurcher?

It sounds as if you need to have each others mobile numbers so everyone can keep an eye out.

Would the police help if they were called? Perhaps it would be worth letting the local bobbies know if this hasn't already been done.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on June 05, 2011, 23:59
We've got phone numbers, not sure if the police would respond to a call. Thing is most of the farmers around here seem to have shotguns.. Hence I think  it could get nasty.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 06, 2011, 00:53
Anyone allowing their lurcher to chase sheep on someone elseís land (with or without a sign reminding them to keep dogs on leads) might anticipate their dog being shot at.

I can understand your concern - I'd not be relaxed seeing someone waving a shot-gun around but the circumstances make it explainable.

I do hope the local police are taking reports seriously, logging them and issuing crime numbers in the case of killed farm animals.
 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on June 06, 2011, 08:30
Living in the countryside you find people have a different set of rules and for good reason. Shotguns are a necessity, my uncle is a game keeper at a stately home and park and has often had to shoot little fluffy fifi/rex etc because they were attacking the deer even though there are ample signs up stating that dogs must always be on a lead. The owners of said fifi then have the nerve to complain to the local papers and my uncle has to then explain and apologise simply because they ignore the warnings  :mad:.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on June 06, 2011, 20:47
Well I'm a townie and I know you keep your dog under control and you shut gates. It's pretty basic stuff! And when in doubt, play it safe. I wouldn't go in the field with the sheep to speak to the shepherd in case I spooked them until he beckoned me over.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on June 06, 2011, 20:51
yes but you have common sense that is sadly lacking in some people  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 06, 2011, 23:23
yes but you have common sense that is sadly lacking in some people  :(

Some don't choose to use common sense (sometimes I don't think "sense" is that common these days) but prefer to be selfish and thoughtless even enjoying the harm they can inflict.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on June 07, 2011, 00:45
We have sometimes seen 'lost dog' signs locally - general opinion is its buried in the corner of a field somewhere.
One local doesn't speak to me now after I asked her to keep her dog under control (we live alongside a bridleway), it was running round the yard and out of sight into my field long before she was in sight, some people don't understand, yet she keeps hens, I wonder how she'd feel if my dogs ran into her field.
We also had someone round offering to 'control rabbits', I said they could use their ferrets down holes but I didn't want their lurchers running round, (I love to see the hares and pheasants about), they never came back, I wonder why?
people think they can just let their dogs run free on a bridleway, forgeting they jump walls, run into peoples yards and gardens, watched 5 dogs go chasing down one of our fields one day, I think they were after a hare, the owner just stood and watched them, probably 'how nice to see them enjoying themselves' GRRRRR
sorry to hijack the thread, but people who don't control their dogs make me SO angry.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: John on June 07, 2011, 12:09
It's the owners to blame, of course. Sadly it's the dog that often pays the price.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on June 08, 2011, 13:14
The fox visited at 4am this morning >:(

We were woken by Tinkers alarm call and there it was a huge dog fox nose against the run >:(

We'd left the pop hole open because it's been so warm at night.  Tinker and Georgie were in the run so the alarm call was very loud.  OH went out to make sure everything was ok and the fox ran down the garden only to walk back up again in the neighbours >:(

When we finally got them calmed down and did a head count Ruby was missing :( a bit of a mystery as we knew that the run hadn't been broken into :unsure:

We had a quick look under the hedges and in the trees but she wasn't there :(

Later when we let Star and the chicks into their run you can imagine out surprise and relief when out came Ruby too :D

Tonight all the hens will be locked up early and let out late and heaven help the fox if it comes back >:(

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on June 08, 2011, 13:45
The fox visited at 4am this morning >:(

We were woken by Tinkers alarm call and there it was a huge dog fox nose against the run >:(

We'd left the pop hole open because it's been so warm at night.  Tinker and Georgie were in the run so the alarm call was very loud.  OH went out to make sure everything was ok and the fox ran down the garden only to walk back up again in the neighbours >:(

When we finally got them calmed down and did a head count Ruby was missing :( a bit of a mystery as we knew that the run hadn't been broken into :unsure:

We had a quick look under the hedges and in the trees but she wasn't there :(

Later when we let Star and the chicks into their run you can imagine out surprise and relief when out came Ruby too :D

Tonight all the hens will be locked up early and let out late and heaven help the fox if it comes back >:(



Glad to hear the fox was unsucessfull Evie.  I am dreading having any sort of fox encounter.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: evie2 on June 08, 2011, 16:45
We've had hens taken before, it's awful :(  I just hope if it comes back and Tinker gives the alert again we'll be able to hear her from inside the coop :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on June 08, 2011, 17:19
The fox visited at 4am this morning >:(

We were woken by Tinkers alarm call and there it was a huge dog fox nose against the run >:(

We'd left the pop hole open because it's been so warm at night.  Tinker and Georgie were in the run so the alarm call was very loud.  OH went out to make sure everything was ok and the fox ran down the garden only to walk back up again in the neighbours >:(

When we finally got them calmed down and did a head count Ruby was missing :( a bit of a mystery as we knew that the run hadn't been broken into :unsure:

We had a quick look under the hedges and in the trees but she wasn't there :(

Later when we let Star and the chicks into their run you can imagine out surprise and relief when out came Ruby too :D

Tonight all the hens will be locked up early and let out late and heaven help the fox if it comes back >:(



It sounds to me as if Ruby's a clever bird and has a good hiding place.
Look for trap doors under the straw.  :lol:

Pleased to hear they are all safe.  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: jen180387 on June 15, 2011, 17:05
we have lost alot too! ours have been through the middle of the day!! we have tried most things and seems to be getting better this week  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Chickensrus on July 16, 2011, 13:04
Hi all
Just reading some of the posts about foxes and thought I'd add this one to the list of deterrents it's a bit gross but apparently works. You need an empty washing up liquid bottle and then fill it with male urine!! Husbands,dads,brothers this is where they can help out! LOL oncethey have filled the bottle for you simply spray around the perimeter of you fencing about twice a week or after heavy rainfall the foxes are deterred by the scent of the urine!! I know it's gross but if it keeps our Girlies safe I'm sure you'd try it anyway!!!!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on July 16, 2011, 13:08
My husband tries his best to oblige with this but with half an acre it takes a lot of doing  ::). It really doesn't put off a hungry fox or mink though or one with young  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 16, 2011, 15:14
My husband tries his best to oblige with this but with half an acre it takes a lot of doing  ::). It really doesn't put off a hungry fox or mink though or one with young  :(

Maybe there is something to be said for a different life-style/culture.

Ever considered taking on a few more husbands?  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on July 16, 2011, 15:38
 :ohmy: good grief I struggle coping with the one I do have  ::) :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 16, 2011, 22:59
:ohmy: good grief I struggle coping with the one I do have  ::) :lol:

 :lol:  :lol:  :lol: but you love him loads  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on July 17, 2011, 00:48
My husband tries his best to oblige with this but with half an acre it takes a lot of doing  ::). It really doesn't put off a hungry fox or mink though or one with young  :(
get him to drink more? (tea/ coffee of course  ;) )
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: DonnaM on July 19, 2011, 21:40
Just to update.........the electric netting is good stuff, no more chickens gone and more importantly the fox has given up and stopped coming at least when we are around. Our cockerel is a brown leghorn and he jumped over it a few times but jumped back when the girls didnt follow and I now think he has had a shock from it as he has stopped doing it. He used to jump/flap/fly out actually touching the top as he went but didnt get a shock because he was not on the ground at the time so I think it took him a day or two to get a zap. I felt a bit mean though as one of the smaller chickens (maybe 6 weeks old) got zapped pecking at the beads on the joins of the netting - quite attractive to a chicken I should think they look like a black seed. Even though we trimmed his wings back he still did it but has now stopped.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 19, 2011, 23:41
Just to update.........the electric netting is good stuff, no more chickens gone and more importantly the fox has given up and stopped coming at least when we are around. Our cockerel is a brown leghorn and he jumped over it a few times but jumped back when the girls didnt follow and I now think he has had a shock from it as he has stopped doing it. He used to jump/flap/fly out actually touching the top as he went but didnt get a shock because he was not on the ground at the time so I think it took him a day or two to get a zap. I felt a bit mean though as one of the smaller chickens (maybe 6 weeks old) got zapped pecking at the beads on the joins of the netting - quite attractive to a chicken I should think they look like a black seed. Even though we trimmed his wings back he still did it but has now stopped.

Pleased to hear the electric netting is working.

I know nothing about it (and little about chickens) ... Do animals with thick coats (such as foxes) actually receive a jolt from electric fencing? I suppose they must if it works effectively.  :unsure:

I'm not going to try it out.  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on July 20, 2011, 10:02


Pleased to hear the electric netting is working.

I know nothing about it (and little about chickens) ... Do animals with thick coats (such as foxes) actually receive a jolt from electric fencing? I suppose they must if it works effectively.  :unsure:

I'm not going to try it out.  :lol:
[/quote]

Foxes & dogs etc tend to explore with their nice wet noses and ...zap! they soon get the message.  Once this happens they stay clear.  The worst thing is if they learn that jumping them is safe which can happpen they become "educated" and don't develop the fear.  It's sometimes suggested a strip of bacon wraped round with a twist of copper wire which is also in contact with the net is a good idea.  I've never done this but it sounds a good idea where ther's an established fox problem.  Nets are actually better than solid fences which can be climbed and don't produce the fear deterent.

My daughters dog and our cat stay well clear of the poultry net now after having had a shock.

You need to remain diligent and keep the grass down and periodically check the net and change the battery if it is run from one.  Most cases I've heard where it has been claimed that they don't work is where the maintanence has been suspect or they've been inadvertently switched off.  Mine are operated off the auto pophole openers so the moment the pophole opens they are switched on and off at night when closed.  Never lost a chicken behind a net.
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on July 20, 2011, 10:07
I had a feeling it was noses at the forefront.  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: DonnaM on July 26, 2011, 09:10
They dont need to touch with their nose at all. Our cat very 'shockingly' demonstrated this while I was showing someone the new net. Poor cat was chatting and mewing to us and 'stroked' her side along the fence as they do. Needless to say, she scarpered!
Ours is run off the mains unit we already had for the boundary fence so that is not a problem.
The man who sold it us was really really good with his advice. Apparently over there the foxes have all steered clear and no one has lost a chicken whilst the power has been on but seemingly the one night it is off for any reason the fox gets in with massive damage. We still shut ours in at night and let them out early because of this, we then have two prongs of defence as it were. One poor lady lost all her while she had house sitters in, they went in to collect the eggs and forgot to switch back on.
The other thing he said was really important was making sure the net was nowhere near anything that could be jumped on and off, even momentarily as this is how foxes can get in. The net is too high to pop over in one jump and too soft to allow them to bounce on and off.
The name of the place is 'paddock perfection' based in Todmorden, they have a website I think :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mossley on July 27, 2011, 15:18
Well, it finally happened (inevitably?) at 4.30am last Tuesday. I lost 4 of my lovely hens. Of the remaining 4, 1 was injured and I thought she might not pull through. Thankfully, she's still with us, but is still on the mend.

Surprisingly, a few eggs have been laid since, but at nowhere near the same level. After a shock like this, how long do people think it might take them to get back into their stride, if at all?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on July 27, 2011, 15:30
it may take a couple of weeks  :(.
Sorry about losing your birds - I hope you have beefed up your protection as the fox will be back  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mossley on July 27, 2011, 15:45
Thanks- yes, it's been (hopefully) sorted. Without going into too much detail, this particular fox won't be back, but there are plenty more out there.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 01, 2011, 01:03
A notice displayed on our allotment site main gate yesterday stated that traps had been set to help control the fox nuisance. Anyone found tampering with the traps would immediately be asked to vacate their plot/s.

Foxes have caused considerable damage on many plots so I'm pleased to see our site wardens taking robust action. Some plot holders would prefer a softer appproach.  :wacko:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on August 01, 2011, 04:50
are these live traps learner? who checks them - they should be checked a couple of times a day at least? and what will they do with any foxes caught?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Dominic on August 01, 2011, 11:16
I think I had a near miss last night, dogs went absolutly ballistic against the patio doors, and by the time I got out, two of my chickens were hiding in the overgrown bits of the garden, a third was confused in the run.
I'd been a bit lax with it being summer, only really expecting an attack in winter.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Barnsley-Bill on August 01, 2011, 23:33
My Birds have been in there new coop/run for about three day's and last night I had a visit from a cunning fox, well he thought he was until jud my dog got hold of him.

up to this I have never seen a fox or heard of one at my allotment. but the double netting run that I did worked well as I could see were it tried to get through but couldnt, but what suppried me was Jud was laid outside of the chicken run when i left so either the fox was dumb or jud was hiding while the last minute, when I got there this morning he was laid with the fox at his feet.

My birds were in the coop locked up and I dont think they heard anything as most of them had laid there eggs by the time I got there.

On the plus side a mate has given me a roll of 13' chainlink fence  so I'm going to extend there run with this as an extra defence. 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on August 02, 2011, 09:10
glad your hens remained safe  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on August 02, 2011, 23:48
Hope you made a big fuss of Jud and a treat as a thank you.  Think we could all do with a guard dog like him.   :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: DonnaM on August 03, 2011, 08:11
What a good dog you have there! What breed is he?
During this last winter I was stunned to see the fox tracks have gone right into my Cairn terriers run, presumably to take their meat and bones. Dogs really dont put them off unless they attack. Even when the Doberman barks he just trots by nonchalantly. Often he does not bark at them anymore as they are so plentiful around here.
Our neighbours are being really hassled by the fox, their chickens are being taken in the day like ours were. And a friend of mine a few miles away has lost the lot, chickens, geese, guinea fowl and some fancy chinese pheasants that cost a fortune.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 04, 2011, 03:13
are these live traps learner? who checks them - they should be checked a couple of times a day at least? and what will they do with any foxes caught?

I've seen only one and believe they are called "box" traps. (They look like a sizeable wire box/cage with a trip and drop down door). They are left baited late afternoon and checked late evening and early the next morning before being reset if needed.

As for what happens once a fox has been unlucky enough to get trapped? I guess a quick bang and that's their lot.

Sad for the fox but they are causing wide-spread damage as their numbers have zoomed up on our site over the last three years.

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on August 04, 2011, 10:18
that's ok then - some people (including some councils so I am led to believe) used to catch them and the release them out in the countryside which for an urban fox used to raiding dustbins and allotments was not fair on the fox nor the countryside. Culling quickly and humanely is the only way to deal with this.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 05, 2011, 01:29
that's ok then - some people (including some councils so I am led to believe) used to catch them and the release them out in the countryside which for an urban fox used to raiding dustbins and allotments was not fair on the fox nor the countryside. Culling quickly and humanely is the only way to deal with this.

It's quick and it's necessary if plot holders are to stand a chance to grow their crops but it's sad to see any life extingusihed. They are creatures in the wrong place.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on August 05, 2011, 05:46
true, I think they are beautiful creatures but do not want any in my backyard getting my chickens  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Barnsley-Bill on August 06, 2011, 12:29
Jud is a Border Collie, trained by myself and i wouldnt sell him for a lottery win lol.
last year a bloke down at our alloments let his 42 chickens out on his garden to help clear it and asked me if jud could round them up to get them back into there coop, I was god smacked by how quick he did this without putting any fear into his birds.

All the other gardners love him as he keeps the rats down, and helps retrieving any wood pigeon's I shoot.

He is my best freind and I would be lost without him.       
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: DonnaM on August 06, 2011, 19:56
Jud is a Border Collie, trained by myself and i wouldnt sell him for a lottery win lol.
last year a bloke down at our alloments let his 42 chickens out on his garden to help clear it and asked me if jud could round them up to get them back into there coop, I was god smacked by how quick he did this without putting any fear into his birds.

All the other gardners love him as he keeps the rats down, and helps retrieving any wood pigeon's I shoot.

He is my best freind and I would be lost without him.       

He sounds like a great dog and definitely a keeper!
I have a friend with a sheep dog that is an amazing worker with sheep but also kills foxes for fun. Amazing how gentle they are with lambs and puppies, dont chase cats yet can kill a fox as easy as pie whilst being totally safe with children as well.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Paul Plots on August 07, 2011, 00:31
Your dog sounds wonderful Barnsley Bill.... I can well imagine how you feel.

As a teenager I had a german shepherd brought home by my dad from the dogsí rescue centre. Once she had settled down, put some weight on and lost her nervousness she was, like your dog, quite amazing.
I still miss her now on occasions.

I decided she was irreplaceable so have not had another dog since.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Barnsley-Bill on August 08, 2011, 15:51
This is Jud after a dip in the river this morning :).

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll291/k3-dude/Allotment/IMG_0550.jpg)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Denise 1963 on August 08, 2011, 23:24
Barnsley-Bill what a lovely dog he is.I have 2 border collies  bill & zak and hope they will look after my chickens,only had the chicken for a few weeks and i live with open fields and allotments behind my house,i know that the foxs are out there as i have had one in my garden and you can hear them at night some times, but hopefully we have done enough to keep the fox out fingers crossed.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Barnsley-Bill on August 09, 2011, 19:27
Hi Denise
I hope Bill and zak look after them like Jud does, and Jud has one blue eye and one brown lol
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on August 19, 2011, 00:24
came across this site, thought it might be of interest
http://www.smallholder-agriculture.co.uk/articles/electric-fences-for-foxes-64
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Andy Pandy on August 21, 2011, 22:48
There is a great new product that allows your chickens to shut themselves in at night!
It doesn't need batteries or power - it just works by weight.  When the chickens climb onto the perch it drops down and a pulley attached to the door closes it.  In the morning when the chickens get off the door opens! We have been using it for 6 months and it is brilliant - the chickens decide when they have had enough and want to go to bed.  This is great if you are not up very early in the morning or you are going out in the evening and not around to lock the girls in. :D
  xRm2U72pu90NR=1
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: storme37 on August 21, 2011, 22:50
I lost all my hens last year to a fox, he/she got in the run and couldnt get out, he was there, carcases all around, feathers everywhere, I introduced him/her to dustbin heaven, now the shotgun is ready (not loaded) I cant shoot them in the street, but if they come into the garden unintroduced, they get a black bag and an introduction to dustbin heaven

Many years ago, I lost my rabbits to a fox, ever since then, I have hated them, I have lost some really beautiful birds to these vermin, I'm not going to lose any more :)

im applying for a shotgun licence asap i do have a .22 air riffle i would if i had to shoot with that to save my birds but it would have to be a life or death job because you cant hunt fox with an air riffle. he would have a sore butt doubt he would be back to soon after that lol.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on August 22, 2011, 10:23
He/she would also end up with a slow lingering death for doing what comes natural to them. It is up to every chicken owner to take precautions to protect their flock (and yes I have suffered a fox attack in the past when it wiped out my ducks and also a mink attack this year when I lost 10 birds so do know what people are going through), but in doing so they should not inflict a painful death on another animal.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on September 10, 2011, 06:37
My beautiful baby collie is now 15 years+8 months and was also wild, extremely stubborn with a terrible attitude problem and still has. She has a huge tumour on her shoulder and is ok at the moment but it is heart wrenching even writing this.

She would have seen any fox off and i once even had to drag her away from a badger she found in field (for her own safety). She was fearless and stupid but wild is an understatement. Saying this i dont think she would have actually tried to kill any fox but more enjoyed the chase.

On this same topic have a look for this for poultry enclosure   www.grow-your-own.ie/electric_fence.html     how to build a leccy fence system.
This is a very good article but note it is more aimed at a farming application and most backyard keepers will not be using permanent fixed installations such as is described.  Electric nets are a more likely thing to use but I note one of the very first equipment recommendations is to use a 7.5joule energiser which would be very unsafe (I think illegal) to use on a flexible net installation.  An energiser of this output energy apart from being very expensive is aimed at a long fixed installation of several kilometres of stock fencing not a 50m poultry net.  I believe 4j is the max legal energy for such an installation and that's overkill.  For a single net I'd recommend an energiser of betweem 0.5joules to 1.2joules depending on the length of the vegetation and number of nets required to be powered.  An animal can become entangled in a net and a 7.5j energiser could well prove fatal as well as being a potential danger for small children.

If you are installing a net make sure the advice you follow is geared to the type of installation you are considering.  Properly installed and specified fences are very safe.

NB Nets do not generally require an eath wire as is described in this article, again this is only a requirement for long (Km) fixed fences.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: digga666 on September 10, 2011, 09:48
That's very true HF. I would think any animal or even child caught in electric netting would be in terrible distress no matter what the output is.

It is a great article to build a fence if you have permanent large enough area though even with a smaller voltage.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on September 10, 2011, 12:48
That's very true HF. I would think any animal or even child caught in electric netting would be in terrible distress no matter what the output is.

It is a great article to build a fence if you have permanent large enough area though even with a smaller voltage.

Just correcting a common misconception.  Voltage is not the issue here it's output energy which counts and it's expressed in joules not volts.  Just like your electricity bill you pay for the energy you use not the voltage.  Voltage is important when it comes to breaking down the insulation which animals are covered in.  Bare skin has little insulation whereas a feather covered chicken has a lot and a fox somewhere beyween the two.  In order to restrain poultry a high output voltage is required ideally 6000+ volts.  Lower output volts may not cause a shock on a feathery back though the comb and skin areas are vulnerable.  Chx do learn and I have some little bantams who have learnt that they don't get zapped if they lift the net by dipping their heads under the bottom strand of the net net and lifting with their hackles.

As digga666 says animals which become entangled in a net aren't killed by the electric shock but can be by the trauma.  It's important that when erecting a net that it is made as taut as possible to reduce the risk of entanglement.  Slack nets easily snagg as well as short to ground.    Such problems are very rare, in over 11 years of using nets I've never had any animal entangled.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: storme37 on September 15, 2011, 20:46
id do what ever i have to to protect my birds if the fox gets hurt so be it thats life it 1 life vs 14 lives no contest im affraid
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on September 16, 2011, 01:39
id do what ever i have to to protect my birds if the fox gets hurt so be it thats life it 1 life vs 14 lives no contest im affraid

Actually it's not very smart to kill the local fox unless it's learnt to get round the net.  What you want to do is educate it that electric fences are dangerous and something they shouldn't cross.  Killing it will just displace another uneducated fox which will be far more danger to your chx than one which has learnt to steer clear.
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ex-cavator on September 16, 2011, 18:55
Just curious, I don't keep chooks, but whenever I log on I see this thread bumped to the top. The title tells us 'It's that time of year again' - the thread started two years ago and hardly a month has passed without a posting. So, just what time of year DO foxes attack?  :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on September 17, 2011, 04:12
Foxes are most active and the most problem to chicken keepers when they have young cubs to feed in the mid March to July period.  The young are born in spring, March and April usually and will leave the den early summer May / June and be taken foraging by their parents.  The family groups start to disperse in Autumn Oct onwards and the young foxes become independant.  Mating takes place through the winter and the vixens are pregnant for about 53 days.

Foxes are a threat all year round but most troublesome once the cubs are weaned until they disperse in Autumn.

Hope this answers your question.
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: derekman on September 19, 2011, 13:28
KILL ALL FOXS IMO.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: hillfooter on September 19, 2011, 20:42
Being in the suberbs of London, we have foxes galore. During darkness we have at least one fox an hour passing the the house at the front and god only knows how many passing through the unlit back garden where the hens are kept. From time to time they can be sen sleeping in the sun on neighbouring shed roofs. Now I like foxes so decided that my chickens would only have access to a run and not the whole garden (I also like my plants). So I took my time and converted an unproductive part of the garden which is shaded by trees for most of the day into a 20ft x 6ft fully enclosed run. It has a base of 4" x 4" gate posts laid flat and staked to the ground to which the upright panels approx 7' x 3' made from 2" x 1" ,are attached. These are covered in aviary mesh as is the roof. I then dug out the interior to about a foot and laid down more aviary wire all overlapped and attached to the gate posts then refilled adding with the earth alot of potting compost which keeps the ground relatively soft for the birds to scratch around in and because we only have 3 hens in this large run, apart from the droppings that are left in the coop itself the run is self composting. I was also a big concern that vermin were not attracted and I am 99% confident that even mice cannot get in! I'll post some pics if I can.

Hi Longbow you're not the guy I used to know on Alcatraz are you?

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: ANHBUC on September 22, 2011, 16:39
Being in the suberbs of London, we have foxes galore. During darkness we have at least one fox an hour passing the the house at the front and god only knows how many passing through the unlit back garden where the hens are kept. From time to time they can be sen sleeping in the sun on neighbouring shed roofs. Now I like foxes so decided that my chickens would only have access to a run and not the whole garden (I also like my plants). So I took my time and converted an unproductive part of the garden which is shaded by trees for most of the day into a 20ft x 6ft fully enclosed run. It has a base of 4" x 4" gate posts laid flat and staked to the ground to which the upright panels approx 7' x 3' made from 2" x 1" ,are attached. These are covered in aviary mesh as is the roof. I then dug out the interior to about a foot and laid down more aviary wire all overlapped and attached to the gate posts then refilled adding with the earth alot of potting compost which keeps the ground relatively soft for the birds to scratch around in and because we only have 3 hens in this large run, apart from the droppings that are left in the coop itself the run is self composting. I was also a big concern that vermin were not attracted and I am 99% confident that even mice cannot get in! I'll post some pics if I can.

Hi Longbow you're not the guy I used to know on Alcatraz are you?

HF

Think he must still be there HF as he hasn't posted for nearly 2 years!!!   :ohmy:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: hillfooter on September 23, 2011, 04:57
Being in the suberbs of London, we have foxes galore. During darkness we have at least one fox an hour passing the the house at the front and god only knows how many passing through the unlit back garden where the hens are kept. From time to time they can be sen sleeping in the sun on neighbouring shed roofs. Now I like foxes so decided that my chickens would only have access to a run and not the whole garden (I also like my plants). So I took my time and converted an unproductive part of the garden which is shaded by trees for most of the day into a 20ft x 6ft fully enclosed run. It has a base of 4" x 4" gate posts laid flat and staked to the ground to which the upright panels approx 7' x 3' made from 2" x 1" ,are attached. These are covered in aviary mesh as is the roof. I then dug out the interior to about a foot and laid down more aviary wire all overlapped and attached to the gate posts then refilled adding with the earth alot of potting compost which keeps the ground relatively soft for the birds to scratch around in and because we only have 3 hens in this large run, apart from the droppings that are left in the coop itself the run is self composting. I was also a big concern that vermin were not attracted and I am 99% confident that even mice cannot get in! I'll post some pics if I can.

Hi Longbow you're not the guy I used to know on Alcatraz are you?

HF

Think he must still be there HF as he hasn't posted for nearly 2 years!!!   :ohmy:

Ahh yes now I remember ............ the Birdman of Alcatraz!
HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: teresa f on September 25, 2011, 12:07
Had just come back from walking my dogs at approx 9.30 this morning to find a fox in my chicken run and one of my girls dead. I have had chickens for a year now and although we do have foxes, they have never been a problem, possibly because we had a cockerel who died a few weeks ago. I guess I know the answer but will he definitely be back and any advice on deterants?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on September 25, 2011, 12:44
Had just come back from walking my dogs at approx 9.30 this morning to find a fox in my chicken run and one of my girls dead. I have had chickens for a year now and although we do have foxes, they have never been a problem, possibly because we had a cockerel who died a few weeks ago. I guess I know the answer but will he definitely be back and any advice on deterants?
He or she is likely to be back now they know how easy it is however if you chased him off that might help to deter him or at least make him more wary if he got a fright.

Physical or electric fence barriers are the only sure fire way to stop a fox.  There are lots of chemical repellents and electronic scarers but I've never seen any test reports which show them to be effective.  At best they may repell a particularl timid and well fed fox but you are not assured of complete protection for all foxes.

A quickly erected barrier is an electric net but it doesn't suit all locations.  It has the effect of educating them not to return once they've had a shock.

A persistant offender can be shot or trapped but that will just displace one with another but at least you might have the opportunity to teach him the dangers before he learns how to breach your defences.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on September 25, 2011, 12:46
sorry for your lost but an electric fence is really the best deterrent or a very secure run which is covered in strong mesh and either has a skirt of mesh all around it or is dug down about 12" to prevent a fox from digging down.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: teresa f on September 25, 2011, 15:22
sorry for your lost but an electric fence is really the best deterrent or a very secure run which is covered in strong mesh and either has a skirt of mesh all around it or is dug down about 12" to prevent a fox from digging down.
He came back half an hour later and had another one. fortunately we were watching for him and she was only hurt but we've had to put them in the coop while we decide what to do. My partner has started to build a mesh roof but that will take time and money as it is a big run, we also normally let them out in the garden for part of the day. not sure what to do, we can't keep them in the coop indefinitely. We also have two Jack Russells so needless to say they are neither use not ornament where protecting chickens is concerned
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Dottyaussie on October 14, 2011, 10:11
I do feel abit sorry for the foxes getting all the blame. We have a pet rabbit that roams around the garden freely with the hens but in the last month it has killed one of the hens and this morning I found loads of feathers in the garden and poor Mary cowering in a corner with most of her back feathers gone. I have witnessed the rabbit chasing the hens before but after a couple of pecks its backed off. I'm keeping Mary inside for a bit to recuperate. Might be time for rabbit stew !!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: blackbelt on October 21, 2011, 19:26
Hello I'm new to this forum so please forgive me if I'm stepping on toes. Here on the homestead I have several game cameras about, just so I can keep an eye out for pest. Are you sure it's a fox getting in? If so you might want to live trap it before it gets into your stock. It's a whole lot easier to do before they build and make it a habit. Just thought I'd share that with you. Threw the years here on the homestead we learned a few things.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: HelenMckenzie on October 25, 2011, 23:22
sorry for your lost but an electric fence is really the best deterrent or a very secure run which is covered in strong mesh and either has a skirt of mesh all around it or is dug down about 12" to prevent a fox from digging down.
Hi, I just wondered what you mean by skirt of mesh all around it?? as it's not really very practical at all for us to dig the mesh down and we have been trying to think of what to do to make the run safer as at the moment the mesh sits on the top of the ground and we have put round wood posts along the floor, but part of the wall of the run is next doors garden fence, which also worries me......
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on October 27, 2011, 08:57
Why are people are so anti fox?  He didn't ask to be born - to be constantly hungry and  intelligent and cunning.  Then he finds that people display delicious looking meaty hens tantalisinlgy gettable which they don't even need (supermarket down the road).  We are the bad guys for tempting them so much.  Then people moan that hunting is illegal!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Lewjam on October 27, 2011, 09:06
By a skirt, if you run weld mesh along the ground (going away from your coop) it will stop the fox digging.

The mesh must be securely fastened to the bottom of the coop (ideally the same piece of mesh thatís running on the side of the coop)

And nerdle, i would say most people are not "anti fox" in a murderous way, they are just doing whatís natural.  The trick is to make it not worth their while to try through use of electric fences etc...

Not many people would seek to kill a fox, as really it serves no purpose in the long run as a new fox will soon take over its territory.  As they are not communal, killing wont educate the local population to stay out of your garden, giving one a good jolt of electricity and letting it scurry away with its tail between its legs might though!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: HelenMckenzie on October 27, 2011, 12:01
hi lewjam, thanks for explaining, a good and simple idea  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Casey76 on October 27, 2011, 14:39
Nerdle, unfortunately until you experience the heartbreak of a predator attack I don't think you can truely comprehend the feelings.

I try my best to keep my girls (and boys) safe, but over the past 3 years I have been attacked time and time again, despite as many counter measures as I can afford.  However knowing that, and the fact that I live in a rural setting, next to a stream, and with woodland close by I know there will be predators about.

I don't resent the foxes or martens for killing my birds for food - even if it upsets/frustrates me, but I do get upset when my birds are killed and then left... it seems such a waste!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on October 28, 2011, 10:57
like Casey I live next to water and rural, the main preditor we get is mink (and I have suffered 2 such attacks). I don't blame the mink but do blame the people who let them out into our countryside where they have done untold damage to our native animals - the water vole is a good example  :(.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Maeve on October 30, 2011, 21:17
On Friday afternoon at about 3.30 I lost my two lovely RIR girls to a young cub that has been visiting our garden.  Koko and Wonky Tail (the Black Rock and Welsummer) were standing under one of the fruit trees near the henhouse, looking petrified.  The attack had clearly just happened as the decapitated bodies were still very warm -I think my going out when I suddenly could not see the hens from the kitchen, must have disturbed the fox.
I am very sad and also angry with myself as I never usually leave then out on their own -not even for a few minutes.  On this one occasion I broke my own rule and did so.  I was busy in the kitchen and thought they would be safe for a short while, especially as I could see them from where I was working.  I have learned a very painful lesson.
My two remaining birds were not their usual selves yesterday but seem much better today. 
I know foxes are now part of the urban environment.  However there seem to be so many in our area (North London) now.   What steps, if any, are we entitled to take in order to reduce numbers?  We would welcome advice from members.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bygrace on October 31, 2011, 15:18
Oh Maeve, so sorry to hear about this. You must have been devastated to find your girls like that.
I do hope that you and your remaining two feel better soon.
BG
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on October 31, 2011, 16:48
Regarding digging mesh into the ground to prevent foxes tunnelling under the fence..

I found you can get 100 9" tent pegs from Ebay for about £15 and banged into the ground at the base of the fence at 3" intervals it would be far less work, much cheaper and still prevent tunnelling hopefully - does anyone else think so?

Kate
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 01, 2011, 09:08
personally I would still go with the digging in of the mesh - 3" gaps allows for a digging fox to get a paw in and move them also they will be a lot easier to pull out than mesh which is all the way around - just removing one will create a 6" gap - 2 a 9" gap plenty big enough for a hungry fox  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: HelenMckenzie on November 01, 2011, 11:31
Hi all,
I was looking at doing the skirt around the edge of our run, how long does the skirt need to be to be safe?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 01, 2011, 11:36
Foxes are clever so I would suggest at least 8 inches which I think is about what Omlet have on their runs.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on November 12, 2011, 22:01
I've recently bought an electric fence off ebay, via a retailer not auction (£32 delivered) it would still need wire and posts, but I got lengths of wood and bought some insulators, wire was £8 from ebay. a few strands of wire round would soon sting its nose.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: mummyeagle on November 14, 2011, 11:25
started keeping a couple of hens this summer. we live in a semi-rural area but close to urban areas. woods next to us and we have large garden. fox killed one hen in broad daylight about a month after i got them while they were free roaming in gareden. he didnt manage to get corpse over fence and other hen wasnt attacked-not sure why. this was in August. decided to get another 2 and be very careful not to leave them in garden if we were out and also omly if bright day ( the attack happened on wet dull day). anyway the other day was beautiful, clear and sunny and all 3 were happily wandering around garden where i could see them. then while i was havind lunch in conservatory i looked out and saw the tell-tale pile of feathers on the lawn, with 2 hens looking disturbed. ran out and the fox had one of hens in corner- dropped it when i shouted and jumped over wall. got to hen as it was in death throes, neck broken. this was at 1pm! this fox is bold. any help or advice gratefully received as i would like to be able to let them continue ranging in garden
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on November 14, 2011, 11:33
really the only thing you can do is to buy an electric fence - now the fox knows where there is a source of food it will be back  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bygrace on November 15, 2011, 10:00
So sorry to hear about this mummyeagle. It must have been awful.
This is something I dread, and I feel so sorry for my girls when I only let them out if I'm actually in the garden with them. They gather excitedly by the gate to their enclosure when they see me - "sorry girlies, I'm only on my way to the compost heap and can't let you out  :( "
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Craigx on November 18, 2011, 19:37
id do what ever i have to to protect my birds if the fox gets hurt so be it thats life it 1 life vs 14 lives no contest im affraid

Hey.

So iv been reading every page in this discussion (madness i know, all 25 pages!), This is the post that strikes me as ideal(sofar), they cannot really protect them selfs, but we can protect them!

Craig
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Lewjam on November 21, 2011, 08:07
Craig,

The point thatís missed there - is that killing the fox wonít make a long-term difference.  Donít get me wrong either, this is from a protection of hens point of view rather then an ethical stance against killing foxes.

If you kill the fox, another will take its territory, come into your garden and take your hens as they are not in a fox proof enclosure.

Only way to successfully protect your hens from a fox, is to make your run fox proof.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: mummyeagle on November 26, 2011, 11:01
thanks bygrace. i now have the same thing-every time i go outside the hens go ballistic and want to get out. i try and let them out for an hour at least but only when i am right next to them. getting tricky now weather is getting worse and not so many jobs to do in the garden!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bygrace on November 26, 2011, 12:37
thanks bygrace. i now have the same thing-every time i go outside the hens go ballistic and want to get out. i try and let them out for an hour at least but only when i am right next to them. getting tricky now weather is getting worse and not so many jobs to do in the garden!
Plenty of jobs to do, but so coooold and wet and windy!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Craigx on November 28, 2011, 00:05
Craig,

The point thatís missed there - is that killing the fox wonít make a long-term difference.  Donít get me wrong either, this is from a protection of hens point of view rather then an ethical stance against killing foxes.

If you kill the fox, another will take its territory, come into your garden and take your hens as they are not in a fox proof enclosure.

Only way to successfully protect your hens from a fox, is to make your run fox proof.



Oh yeah, i know, but i agree with what he/she is saying, thats all lol,

Craig
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on December 10, 2011, 11:16
Well, ethical or not, I shot the last fox that came into my garden looking for a 'free lunch'

I dont have a problem with foxes raking out the bins, but they leave my hens alone, okay my hens are locked away at nigght, they have a scratch around in the garden for a few hours, then I put em in the run

I treat the fox as a trespasser, I know that if he does decided to drop in while the hens are in the garden he will have a 'snack' I put a stop straight away, and he gets a welcome to 'dustbin heaven'

The 'do gooders' have no idea of the havoc and death these vermin can cause in a run, so I dont really take any notice of their opinions

Councils dont/cant control the fox population, so its up to the individual to do it, anyway they can, just doing my bit ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on December 11, 2011, 08:48
Pepsi

Supermarket eggs/chicken is cheap so why do you keep chickens?  Are you too poor to buy food at Asda?

I suspect you keep them for pleasure like most people.  The fox isn't doing this for pleasure - he's hungry and has no choice.  Is he supposed to know that they are yours and he may not have them?

I treasure our wildlife (what's left of it).  The spread of the urban fox results from our wastefulness of food - the responsibility is ours. I love to see foxes and hope they never go away.

If you want to pleasure of chickens protect them.  Live and let live.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on December 11, 2011, 09:05
Pepsi

Supermarket eggs/chicken is cheap so why do you keep chickens?  Are you too poor to buy food at Asda?

I suspect you keep them for pleasure like most people.  The fox isn't doing this for pleasure - he's hungry and has no choice.  Is he supposed to know that they are yours and he may not have them?

I treasure our wildlife (what's left of it).  The spread of the urban fox results from our wastefulness of food - the responsibility is ours. I love to see foxes and hope they never go away.

If you want to pleasure of chickens protect them.  Live and let live.



I dont use Asda

I have no problem with any wildlife, but foxes are vermin, same as rats and mice, as they are wild life do I let them run amok in the hen house ?

The foxes I have shot have been mange ridden, chances are they would spread disease, if they want food, the bins are full of it

My chickens are protected, I have lost hens to foxes before, there is nothing nice about a fox in a  hen house, they dont just kill one, they wipe out everything

Its not just hens I lost, they ripped out the hutches for my kids rabbits, killed the lot, YOU TRY TELLING KIDS that is not wrong for a fox to kill their pet rabbits

As long as I am able and have my hens, I will dispatch any foxes that come into my garden, I will put poison  down to kill rats, and other vermin

So you crack on watching the wild life
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on December 11, 2011, 09:46
I suggest you fox proof properly and not impose more anguish on your children.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on December 11, 2011, 09:54
I suggest you fox proof properly and not impose more anguish on your children.

My hens are fine, the run is fox proof, but if a fox comes into the garden they set up a din, they dont know the fox cant get in, I ensure he doesnt

They are dispathed with a single round, they dont suffer, they are introduced to a dustbin

I have 2 hedgehogs hibernating in my garden at the moment, under a compost bin, that is the type of wildlife that thrives in my garden, not vermin like rats, foxes, mice
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on December 11, 2011, 10:13
please can we keep this topic friendly and full of information regarding how best to prevent a fox getting in to kill your birds - by this we mean secure ways of fencing e.g digging down with your mesh, electric fencing etc. Shooting is not always the answer - not everybody is able to aim accurately which leaves an animal to have a slow painful death. Also please remember that even for an air rifle you now need a license, the law doesn't differentiate between those and any other more powerful gun.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on December 11, 2011, 10:27
Thank you joyful, I have a licence for my weapon, I user it responsably, I hit what I am aiming at

I store my weapon securely, I have regular security checks from the police

I shoot rabbits and foxes at a major airport (they used to use myxmatosis to control the rabbits, not a nice way for any animal to go)

On the subject of my hens and their run, I have dug down 18 inches with wire netting, I have a wire frome around the run, they are as secure as I can make them

BUT as the councils are powerless to control the fox population,(if they do, it will be with poison, thats a nice harmless way to go)

I have to do what I can within the law, which I have done, it may not be suitable for everyone, though

Foxes are classed as vermin
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on December 13, 2011, 00:22
................ Also please remember that even for an air rifle you now need a license, the law doesn't differentiate between those and any other more powerful gun.

Hi Joy,

I'm not sure the above is true, you don't need a licence for an air rifle provided it is below the legal Fire Arms Certificate limit which is 12ftlbs of energy.  Most air rifles used for target shooting  and all air rifles offered for sale new online are below the FAC limit.  

However there is no distinction in law between offenses committed with an air rifle and ones committed with a more powerful licenced rifle.  So for example if you threaten or shoot someone with an low power air rifle or an AK-47, the law makes no distinction and both theoretically could carry the same penalty.

If you use an air rifle to control vermin (and I'm not in any way suggesting that Pepsi100 is using an air rifle) you are as with any firearm required to be responsible in how you use it and where you use it and you should know what the suitable quarry for the power of rifle you use is.  Foxes aren't suitable quary for any air rifle.  The following mammal vermin are, brown rats, grey squirrels, stoats, mink and rabbits.  

The BASC provides further guidance on the use of air rifles.

HF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on December 13, 2011, 00:45
Thanks  hillfooter for the information,

ALL firearms regardless of power (from a shot gun to a airsoft gun (toy)) should all be used correctly, no weapon is a toy, they can all cause harm

No matter where a weapon is used (private land or public) you can and will be prosecuted if you do cause harm or undue suffering to ANY animal (vermin or otherwise) or take a weapon out on the streets unless it is in a gun bag

Some here may think I am some kind of nutter who runs around shooting any vermin that appear, just to make things clear, IF I want to use my weapon, I have to go upstairs, unlock the loft hatch, get into the loft, unlocker my steel gun locker, then unlock the steeel ammunition locker at the other end of the loft (shot gun and ammunition cant be kept in the same locker, I would think that anything would vbe long gone by the time I got back

The foxes I have shot have been in the run and havent found their way out, usually covered in feathers from their deed

I have to keep any cartridges I have fired, I can only have a limited amount of ammunition at any time (usually agreed between myself and the police)

I was a soldier for 16 years, I know my way around weapons, I have NEVER had an accident or a ND (neglient discharge) while I was serving, I dont advertise I have any weapons in my home

I think I am safe to use a weapon, so do the police or they would revoke my licence and confiscate my weapon and ammunition
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 13, 2011, 20:42
I think there is some confusion regarding air rifles.
apart from the well known original type, there is one whch I believe uses a type of gas canister, these are commonly called air rifles but do need a form of licence.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: hillfooter on December 13, 2011, 22:07
I think there is some confusion regarding air rifles.
apart from the well known original type, there is one whch I believe uses a type of gas canister, these are commonly called air rifles but do need a form of licence.

Not so.  Airguns are simply guns which use compressed air (or CO2 gas) to propel a pellet.  Whether the compressed air is charged from a gas canister or mechanically generated by releasing a cocked spring is immaterial.  It's the energy discharged which determines whether a FAC (Fire Arms Certificate) is required. 

Guns which use other compressed gas (other than air or CO2) require a FAC automatically.  The majority of airguns use a cocked spring or a CO2 gas charge system.  The benefit of the later being that repeated (automatic) operation is possible from a preloaded magazine.

BASC publish information on air guns and the law
http://www.basc.org.uk/en/utilities/document-summary.cfm/docid/54486592-4812-41DB-8FC5E78820E2D7BAHF
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: penninehillbilly on December 14, 2011, 01:30
Additionally Section 48 of the 1997
Firearms (Amendment) Act includes air weapons powered by compressed carbon dioxide (CO2). Firearms using other gases are not so exempt and require a firearm certificate in order to possess them, regardless of their power.

Presumably these are what BIL was talking about-

Section 5 of the Firearms Act 1968 (as amended) contains various descriptions. Any firearms (regardless of kinetic energy) that fall within any of the following definitions are prohibited weapons.
6. Any air rifle, air gun or air pistol which uses, or is designed or adapted for use with, a self-contained gas cartridge system [Section 5(1)(af)] (i.e. Brocock and Saxby-Palmer type)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on December 14, 2011, 13:11
Hoping to change the subject a bit......
I've put a lot of effort into foxproofing lately but can a fox climb a tree and jump over?  How well do they climb exactly?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on December 14, 2011, 16:28
Hoping to change the subject a bit......
I've put a lot of effort into foxproofing lately but can a fox climb a tree and jump over?  How well do they climb exactly?


Very well so your run/enclosure should be well away from trees, fences or anything else they could climb.

Here is a video link of a fox in a tree, think he is raiding a nest.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmGxacavuvw

and one of a fox on top of a 12 foot hedge

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiwgP7TtOQQ
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on December 14, 2011, 16:56
They are so clever!

They do need something to grip though but I have more fox proofing to do!!!!!!!!!!
A block halfway up a branch should fix it.....I hope.......! :wub:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: mummyeagle on December 17, 2011, 18:42
saw thefox again at 9am it hurtled across the lawn and jumped up the wall at end of garden. nearly made it but fell off- the wall is about 7 ftat thatpoint. he then managed a 6 ft climb further along at about 6 ft and over into the woods ( a 12 ft drop!). so athletic unfortunately. still have my 2 chooks as being very careful
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: TheWebbFamily on December 18, 2011, 14:14
I wish we had known about this site when we first got our girls.  My hubby and daughter really wanted chickens and i suppose i just went along with their wishes.  I always thought i wasn't that fussed with them, having to sweep paths and hose down to keep poop to a manageable level made me think they were hard work at times, especially after a long shift at work.  However after the events of Friday night Saturday morning I was so wrong, I loved our girls, they were fab layers and all had their own little characters.  As i type this i really cant stop the tears flowing.

We had friends visiting this weekend and had been chatting excitedly about introducing them to the girls the next morning.  I even warned them that being at the back of the house they would probably be woken by their indignant squawks that they were still inside ...

At 9.20am yesterday I got up and thought the girls must be out as they were all quiet, thinking our poor guests had been disturbed and been kind enough to let them out.  I went to the back door and it was locked I opened it and at 09.22am my heart broke with the silence and scene that was there to greet me.  I saw a pile of feathers and thought omg what on earth?  (i will hasten to add we were very new to chicken keeping)  as i got closer to the coop it was then i noticed the first mangled bird ..... i screamed until hubby got to me ..... we then checked and there were no others, three missing hens.  We thought they had probably escaped in fear of whatever had done this.  Daughter and one of our friends scoured the neighbourhood and apart from finding some feathers a little further from the house there was nothing :(

We went inside and i just broke down, how could this happen to us?  My daughter went out to the garden and went and sat on the small wall we have which runs to the back of our house and she looked and saw a freshly dug hole, she thought it was odd and called her Dad he ordered her inside and then checked .... yes it was one of the other girls ... double tragedy.  We then considered all the other places a bird could be hidden and started hunting high and low.  To the rear of our garden we have raised beds and in one of these we found Chook, our black speckled neck Maran buried there.  So now we have two buried birds, one mangled bird and one missing one, which we presume the predator must have eaten.

We sat and wept, our beloved chickens were gone and we felt so helpless and that we had let them down.  It was then that discussion turned to foxes had done this. I have NEVER considered foxes, yes i live in a village which is near farms but i just have never seen a fox in our garden or even in the locality.

Following trawling the internet it became aparant that foxes do once inside a hen house, kill all even if they dont eat them and that they bury the rest to retrieve at a later date.  I was flabbercast, i know they call foxes wily, cunning and sly but now i fully understand why.

We have lost pets, including the 17 year old cat this year, but that has always been old age and expected.  To lose these girls in such terrible circumstances has left me so upset i am not sure what we do next.

We may get chickens again in the New Year but the coop will be placed on a patio base .... to protect them.  We need to mourn our loss for now and remember the funny times we had with our girls.

To anyone reading this please please please protect your birds i would never wish this on anyone else.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on December 18, 2011, 16:21
 :(  Sorry to hear your sad news, we do get attached to our hens and you must be heartbroken to loose all of them.

Not the best time for you but welcome to the website and I hope that happer times are just around the corner for you and your family.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: mummyeagle on January 07, 2012, 16:45
condolences to thewebbfamily on the loss of their hens. it is awful when a fox gets them and hopefully it wont stop you getting some more. lots of good advice on these pages.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mickle on January 18, 2012, 14:48
Foxes mainly go under the wire and a good tip is to bend the wire bottom out 12-14" and bury it, they dig right alongside the wire to get underneath and the buried wire thwarts their plans, it also pays for the top of the wire fence to be loose and lean outwards and at a height that would make climbing over virtually impossible.
They are predictable and seem to visit a site on alternate nights approaching on a recognised run.
Being an opportunist they frequently check poulty houses during darkness on the off chance that you havent locked them up. 

Their problem is once in they will kill everything they can get their jaws round be it 1 or 100+1, Fatigue steadies their bloodlust.



Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: viettaclark on February 08, 2012, 23:16
I am sitting here still distraught after a big dog fox had a go at my 6 hens when they were in the garden at 3.30 this afternoon. I've been very wary since seeing a vixen one morning last week and I lost 2 young birds last Spring.
I heard a bit of unusual noise, looked out of the window and my biggest bird was being dragged down the garden with feathers flying everywhere, When I screamed the fox let go and dashed off. Phyllis is ok I think but totally traumatised.....she's a strong, heavy hen and was a bit more difficult to kill.
Then I checked the others and Speckledie was missing with huge piles of her torn out feathers leading towards the bottom fence. She has just come out of a brood and is moulting so she's much lighter and I thought she had been taken off.
The other 4 were rosey and milling about the old coop and eventually I realised they were trying to tell me something.
There was a ragged scrunched up bird hiding in the corner! She eventually came out but neither she nor Phyllis would let me near to check for wounds although both seemed to be walking ok.
I put treats in the run, which is pretty foxproof and they all crowded in, ignoring the food, just shivering in one corner together. Then Phyllis went into the coop and the others followed (this is 4pm) so I locked them in. I've got an Eglu Cube which is definitely fox proof.
I'm not sure what to do now. My first thought was a gun, but an air rifle wouldn't be suitable. Can you get a professional in with a shotgun to kill them? Then poison but we have cats and so do our neighbours. Then electric wire round the 6' boundary fence but that would cost a mint and might hurt the cats.
I always let out the birds during the day. The run was fine for 3 birds but I've got 6 now and I don't like confining them in that space for too long.
The only solution seems to be to expand the run and make sure it's totally foxproof (?) but this will take some time. I must only let the girls out if I'm there with them which is a b****r at this time of year. I'm at my wit's end.
I spoke to the Council after the last attack and they gave me the number of a private vermin removal company. If I pay £150 (per fox and there are at least 2) they will humanely trap and remove them and let them go elsewhere. As dogs will find their way home and money is tight this is not an option.
I'm not looking forward to opening the pop hole tomorrow morning. I may have 2 girls dead from shock. :(
What can I do?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: viettaclark on February 09, 2012, 01:17
I have ordered the walk-in run and extension from Omlet. I haven't told the OH yet (he works away) and it's our holiday money but I researched wire, wood etc (he made the 3x1m run joined on to the Eglu run) and it would cost over £200 to make a basic walk-in run and he's now got no time to make it.
Delivery on Monday so if the kids help we might have more FOX-SAFE space for the chooks in less than a week.
And I won't break my back changing the water!!!
Oh cripes....what's he going to say......? :blink:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 09, 2012, 13:17
I'm sure he will understand, and don't forget to post photos of the run  :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on February 09, 2012, 13:52
I have ordered the walk-in run and extension from Omlet. I haven't told the OH yet (he works away) and it's our holiday money but I researched wire, wood etc (he made the 3x1m run joined on to the Eglu run) and it would cost over £200 to make a basic walk-in run and he's now got no time to make it.
Delivery on Monday so if the kids help we might have more FOX-SAFE space for the chooks in less than a week.
And I won't break my back changing the water!!!
Oh cripes....what's he going to say......? :blink:


I didn't know Omlet did walk in runs, I thought they were stoop in runs!   :lol:  How tall are they?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 10, 2012, 19:32
Eglu have just started to do stand up runs. They are big enough to stand up in.

Interesting to know how much making a stand up run from scratch. we were thinking of doing that but it might be cheaper to buy one form egglu. 

We have a Heath Robinson affair at the moment made of bamboo and netting. It isn't to stop the blasted foxes getting in, the electic fence does that, but we have some intrepid fliers who are also escape artists. I have tried telling them about the fox but they don't seem bothered.  We put up a make shift affair until we can decide what to do.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on February 10, 2012, 20:00
Eglu have just started to do stand up runs. They are big enough to stand up in.

Interesting to know how much making a stand up run from scratch. we were thinking of doing that but it might be cheaper to buy one form egglu. 

We have a Heath Robinson affair at the moment made of bamboo and netting. It isn't to stop the blasted foxes getting in, the electic fence does that, but we have some intrepid fliers who are also escape artists. I have tried telling them about the fox but they don't seem bothered.  We put up a make shift affair until we can decide what to do.

Had a look at the eglu ones, they are expensive.  I would go for something like this
www.chicken-house.co.uk/acatalog/Large_Run.html which is larger, has a roof and cheaper.  ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 10, 2012, 20:25
but that is still £402 plus vat for a 6 feet x 9 feet basic with no anti dig mesh etc, and at least the Omlet ones are made of metal - no wood.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: viettaclark on February 11, 2012, 01:20
Interesting.....I paid £675 for a 3x2x2 m walk-in run which is slightly bigger and easier to move/dismantle. It also fits onto the Cube and run.
If you tally up the wooden run costs it's £584+ and you don't know the delivery but there is a roof too. It looks pretty solid but the posts obscure the view. The Omlet one seems more "open".
Never mind! I've got it now (one of the managers had a meeting in Romsey and brought it down next day because I was so fraught)
It goes up tomorrow as long as the fingers survive doing 300+ clips in icy temperatures....and I've already got a tarpaulin for the roof.
By the way...the chooks are ok if feathers rather lacking and Speckledie has laid an egg for two days. These are her first eggs for 2 months so maybe the shock got her moving......
They are not too impressed with staying in the run but are laying much better.....boredom? ::) :D
New run tomorrow girls!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on February 11, 2012, 22:08
Glad your girls are coping.  Some of mine have just come back into lay so it might be a coincidence.  Good luck with your tricky clips, you could try warming your hands on a newly laid egg!!!   :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 12, 2012, 01:06
Glad the chooks are rallying.
Checked out the wooden run. Think I prefer the omlet run as it will fit in the space in the garden perfectly and seems less intrusive to the garden. Also I know it will be fox proof.

Really need something to stop the ladies flying out. EVen with their wings clipped they are great at flying out! Hence the Heath Robinson affair.

I get so frustrated and mad about councils doing nothing about controlling the foxes. We have so many and they are growing in number. Spoke to a game dealer recently who said that they rarely see foxes in his area except when townies have trapped a fox and come to the countryside to let them go. Apparently they don't last long in his area as the locals go out in their jeeps, lamp them and shoot them.

Although we have the electric fence round the girls run we still get a bit twitchy, especially as my sister has had a fox breach her electric fence and finish off the last of her girls.

We have had the local foxes visiting the garden much more recently and hubby has hurtled down out garden hurling obsenities at them several times a day but they still come back.

We have tried almost everything to keep them out of the garden. We have 6 foot fences and put prikka strips on them optimistically thinking that that would put paid to the  vile creatures but it hasn't stopped them.  They still scramble over the fences prikka strips and all. Narked about that as they weren't cheap.

We also went to the bother of having a small hedgehog hole cut in the bottom of the gravel boards of the new fences and was infuriated to see a fox squeeze though it.
Double jeapardy....... board up the hole and not see our hedgehogs visiting or see the hedgehogs and risk the foxes. As the foxes get in anyway we left the holes as I would miss the hedge pigs.

Sometimes if I put down a lot of chilli pepper it stops the fox  getting through the hole for  a while.

I don't like the sound of pest controllers charging £150 just to catch the fox and let the b.....r out else where. At that price you could get your own fox trap and take it on its holidays and you would still have the  trap for further use.

Although strictly speaking I have been led to believe that it is illegal to let the beast out once you have caught it and that you should have it shot.

I am looking into paying someone to deal with our fox nuisance but I will want to see the body! Not paying for them to let the brute out again  once they have caught it. I believe that they are rather good at finding there way back to their own territories again.

Really bugs me that I can't let our girls free range any more. They do remember and pine to get out in the garden! 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: viettaclark on February 13, 2012, 00:00
Well, we spent all week-end in icy temperatures getting chilblains in toes and fingers and calouses from clipping and tying. Also had to dig out a bit to make the area level.
I hope the girls appreciate the effort!
Anyway, they now have a super new home with even more room than I thought because we managed to join on the 3x1m run made by the OH. All under cover but rain will get in the sides of the walk-in bit.
I was initially a bit surprised at how flimsy it seemed and using a tarpaulin for the roof means rain will run down the edges. However OH has plans for some sort of guttering so I'll be saving rainwater as well.
The instructions were totally BAD and there weren't enough cable ties but too many clips. I have piled loads of saved dead leaves on the earth floor, put paving slabs around the un-wired run and tomorrow I'll cover the wired runs with earth.
Putting the Cube and it's run on seemed to stabilise it more and it's pretty unobtrusive because it's green mesh with no thick supports.
I'm much happier about leaving them in there all day when I'm not in the garden. When we were building the girls were out but I will have to be with them now. I'm not going through that again.
Anyway, hopefully fox-proof and I can walk in to do raking, food, water etc. which is a godsend with arthritic knees!!.
I will try and post some pics of my amazing new set-up soon.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 13, 2012, 07:16
ahem forgotten something?

PHOTO'S please  :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: dancingbillie on February 17, 2012, 13:23

I had 5 of my hens killed by a fox last summer because I'd put all the dogs in the house while I went shopping. 
The silly hens had flown up on top of their coop (which is over 2 metres high and adjacent to the house terrace where the dogs usually play) from their fox proof park,  then flown down into the main garden.  I don't know where the fox got in but he/she killed 5 and traumatised another who was almost featherless after the attack and stood staring at the inside wall of Cluckingham Palace for about 2 weeks, only moving to eat and drink, but since has grown feathers and is laying again.

I'd like to buy an automatic door for their coop but don't know how efficient they are.
Anyone got any experience?

I don't have anymore problems with rats going in their coop since buying a Solway rat proof feeder.
After 3 "lean" months with only getting 3 eggs from 15  hens, they've now started laying "normally."
I've a Speckledy, a White Sussex, 4 Bluebells, 4 Copper Blacks, an Amber Link and 3 little brown hens of unknown breed. 
I bought a second Amber Link at the same time as the one I have at the moment, but had to put it to sleep because it's comb never developed at all, and it was always "sickly" and never laid an egg.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on February 17, 2012, 21:35
Hello Dancingbillie
I'm scared of anything technical but got an auto pop hole cover and an aluminium door from Flyte so Fancy.  Its great !

Huge help when I went on holiday as much easier job for hensitter.

Read the instuctions carefully - it really works!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: bood77 on March 06, 2012, 06:55
when i was a bit youger about 9 i am 16 now a fox came and killed all of my chook i hate foxes now but since then we got rid of our ducks and have had no trouble with them i see them because we live out in the country but thank god nothing has happened my heart goes out to the people who have lost there chooks to foxes.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: dancingbillie on March 06, 2012, 17:12
when i was a bit youger about 9 i am 16 now a fox came and killed all of my chook i hate foxes now but since then we got rid of our ducks and have had no trouble with them i see them because we live out in the country but thank god nothing has happened my heart goes out to the people who have lost there chooks to foxes.

I love foxes and would never harm one.  It was my fault he took my hens because I hadn't protected them enough.  They have their cubs that need feeding at this time of the year, so I'm doubly careful.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on March 06, 2012, 19:23
I totally agree with you dancingbillie.

Keeping chickens without fox proofing is like driving without insurance.

People should be angry with themselves when the chickens get foxed - they didn't take enough care.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on March 07, 2012, 17:31
We all hope that our set up is fox proof but might not know until it is too late.  I love letting my ladies freerange for some of the day and keep an eye on them but it only takes a few seconds for a fox to jump the fence and grab a hen.

They are my pets and they do have a large enclosure but they have cleared everything but the mud at the moment!   ::)  It is really good for them to have a scrat about in the rest of the garden.

If a fox were to attack a cat or small dog would we expect to keep them in a fox proof enclosure for their safety or would we be asking for the fox population to be kept under control?

I really feel for anyone who has lost any poultry to a fox, please do not blame yourselves I am sure you did your best to protect them.

Just my opinion.   ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: dancingbillie on March 08, 2012, 10:24
It is very rare for a fox to take a dog, and it is a very small, elderly sick dog they usually take, same goes for cats.  If people are at home and a small dog is in the garden, I doubt very much the fox would come and take it, and to leave any dog, small, medium or large in the garden when owners aren't there is not wise as there are so many dog thefts with dogs being taken from gardens, outside of shops, cars etc, and the numbers are increasing daily.  The thieves don't care if it is a pure breed, mongrel, old, young.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on March 08, 2012, 10:30
It is very rare for a fox to take a dog, and it is a very small, elderly sick dog they usually take, same goes for cats.  If people are at home and a small dog is in the garden, I doubt very much the fox would come and take it, and to leave any dog, small, medium or large in the garden when owners aren't there is not wise as there are so many dog thefts with dogs being taken from gardens, outside of shops, cars etc, and the numbers are increasing daily.  The thieves don't care if it is a pure breed, mongrel, old, young.

It may be rare but some are not scared of humans any more.
www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1346866/Fox-came-cat-flap-bit-finger-says-ambulance-driver-Tammy-Page.html

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1284505/Baby-twins-Isabella-Lola-Koupparis-seriously-injured-fox-attack.html
 :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: dancingbillie on March 08, 2012, 10:52
Foxes belong in the countryside, but unfortunately people have been luring them into urban areas by feeding them and thinking it is cute to have a fox and her cubs under their sheds in the garden.  Foxes are opportunists and very intelligent.
There is food waste outside of restaurants and fast food places and burger vans.  If a fox, or any wild animal feels threatened, it will either fight or flee, depending which is easiest.  (that includes if it's source of food is threatened! i.e. dog/cat food in the kitchen, etc.)
If there is no available food source, the foxes will leave the area and go elsewhere to look for food.
At the moment vixens have their cubs that need feeding and if scavenging isn't bringing enough food for them, they will take what they can.
They are wild animals that should be treated as such.  I know too many people who are really chuffed that they see foxes in towns and cities, and even try to tame them by feeding them and bringing the food bowl nearer and nearer to their door "so they can stroke them."!!!!  Foxes in towns and cities should be eliminated (I can't believe I just wrote that!!!), but as long as you have idiots who dispose of their fish and chips/hamburger  leftovers etc, foxes will keep coming.
You never get an "overload" of foxes in the countryside because they only whelp and rear according to the area that is available to them, but there are farmers and land owners who actually breed foxes for the hunt.  (yes, it is supposed to be illegal these days, but go tell that to the riders and the packs!)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on March 08, 2012, 11:05
As you say people must be feeding them as we now have wheelie bins so they can't scavenge from them like they did with the old style bins.

Years ago my daughter saw our cat jump back over our fence from a neighbours garden.  Followed by a fox which then jumped over our back fence when it saw her.  This was in the middle of the day so they are too bold for my liking and agree that they should be controlled in residential areas.  Our cat is now very elderly so she can't jump up on a low wall let alone clear a fence.  It is a worry as she is also deaf and if they get really hungry she will be easy prey for them.   :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on March 13, 2012, 19:21
Foxes belong in the countryside, but unfortunately people have been luring them into urban areas by feeding them and thinking it is cute to have a fox and her cubs under their sheds in the garden.  Foxes are opportunists and very intelligent.
There is food waste outside of restaurants and fast food places and burger vans.  If a fox, or any wild animal feels threatened, it will either fight or flee, depending which is easiest.  (that includes if it's source of food is threatened! i.e. dog/cat food in the kitchen, etc.)
If there is no available food source, the foxes will leave the area and go elsewhere to look for food.
At the moment vixens have their cubs that need feeding and if scavenging isn't bringing enough food for them, they will take what they can.
They are wild animals that should be treated as such.  I know too many people who are really chuffed that they see foxes in towns and cities, and even try to tame them by feeding them and bringing the food bowl nearer and nearer to their door "so they can stroke them."!!!!  Foxes in towns and cities should be eliminated (I can't believe I just wrote that!!!), but as long as you have idiots who dispose of their fish and chips/hamburger  leftovers etc, foxes will keep coming.
You never get an "overload" of foxes in the countryside because they only whelp and rear according to the area that is available to them, but there are farmers and land owners who actually breed foxes for the hunt.  (yes, it is supposed to be illegal these days, but go tell that to the riders and the packs!)

Totally agree with the sentiment. They are too bold and fearless and too many. One helped themselves to a friends guinea pig while they were eating Sunday lunch. Dug under the hutch, turned it over and bye bye Guinea pig. She was devasted.

I wholeheartedly agree with the  comment referring to keeping dogs in a fox proof enclosure too. I feel very resentful that I can't let me girls free range because of these pests, If it were  a snarling dog trespassing in the garden we could get someone out to deal with that!

Was talking to a game dealer at a farmers market a while back and he says that foxes in the country are actually quite rare as if there are any people go out in the landie, lamp them and shoot them.

Really had to keep my temper recently :mad: I was serving on a hog roast and someone was going to take the bones to feed the foxes :D I did politely mention that it wasn't a good idea to feed them and made sure I didn't leave any meat on the bones.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on March 15, 2012, 08:12
We lost one of our hens to a fox yesterday morning - OH had locked them up the previous evening but forgot to count them all to make sure they were safe inside the coop. He feels really bad about it certainly made sure that he did a double check last night - he even tried to put the hens away early but they were having none of that.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on March 15, 2012, 13:43
Oh dear Springlands  :(  I bet he feels really guilty.

Luckily only one and the reminder we all need from time to time to remain vigilant.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on March 15, 2012, 16:15
Hi Thrift - yes he does feel guilty about it. Normally it is me who locks up the hens and ducks and I always count them - not easy as we have one very small  hen who sleeps under the wings of a big one and all you can see is a little head peeking out. So last night we put them away together just so we could double count.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on March 15, 2012, 17:04
Sad to hear that you have lost one of your girls Springlands.    :( 

It is really hard to count them sometimes as you have said they do like to cuddle up.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: mummyeagle on March 21, 2012, 10:09
recently seen a red kite hovering over me and chickens in garden. has happened twice and it looked like it was interested in our chooks. we waved arms about and it flew off slowly. also several sightings of sparrowhawks. does anyone know if red kites would be able to take a chicken-i know they can take a rabbit. bad enough that have to watch out for the fox without checking the sky as well!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Jomtie on April 01, 2012, 15:34
We are currently constructing a bigger run for our 4 girls. We have had them for 3 weeks and they have free range in the garden but only when we are out there with them. Their current run (that came with the coop) is only about 7 x 3 feet so hubby is building one in a shady spot at the top of the garden that is 10 x 8 feet. He has dug down around the entire perimeter to a depth of 10 inches and laid a course of concrete blocks. He has then built the framework for the run on top of these and screwed it to the blocks. We are using 25mm square 19g mesh which is stapled and then sandwiched between battons. We plan to slab around the outside of the perimeter too. It is 6 feet high and will have a corrugated plastic roof.  Is there anything else that we need to do to prevent a fox attack?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on April 02, 2012, 09:12
Sounds like chukky Fort Knox to me.  I'm not certain of the strength of the mesh you mention but a pest controller could advise.

I don't think is essential to dig down to keep foxy out - an Eglu style apron of mesh on the ground around the outside will do. 

t-mjxderHVQ
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Jomtie on April 02, 2012, 11:54
Thanks so much for your reply. The weld mesh is the gauge recommended on several websites as able to keep out foxes. Sadly, we didn't realise we needed even smaller mesh to keep out rats. We thought 25mm would be too small for a rat to get through, so back to the drawing board. Can't afford to replace it all now. Our weak spot is the back of the run where it is against a fence. There is gravel board at the base of the panels but our neighbour at the back has a row of Leylandii along the fence on his side and the roots are making it impossible to dig down to put the blocks in. I think an apron of weld mesh along there is the best option. Thanks for the suggestion. We've only had our girls for 3 weeks but they have so much personality and are already part of the family. I would be devastated if we lost any, especially to a fox. We have been rewarded with our very first egg this morning!! I would never have believed how excited we would all be!!   :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on April 03, 2012, 21:33
That first egg is always a thrill - congratulations! There ought to be a 'first egg' section on this site.

A pest controller told me if its clean with no food left out at night there should be no problems with rats.  I'm sure others will know better on that one though. Might get mine a treadle feeder so she can breakfast at 6am when I'm asleep.

So glad you are doing the right thing (foxproofing)- so much trauma going on because of fox attacks and Mr Fox usually gets the blame.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ryan on April 11, 2012, 11:26
went out this morning to be greeted by a chicken thought it was strange as i allways check its secure, went to inspect and found the door closed feathers everywhere, three of them with no heads and two carrying on as normal cant find any holes dug and dont have a clue as to how the fox got in or how the other one got out.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on April 11, 2012, 11:50
Put your escapee back in and put food outside the run where they can see it. They will probably demonstrate it for you.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Jomtie on April 11, 2012, 14:40
How horrible for you Ryan  :ohmy:. Sounds like good advice from nerdle. I really hope you manage to find the place that the fox got in so you can keep your remaining girls safe. What a worry though  :( .
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on April 11, 2012, 14:56
So sorry Ryan.  :( If you can put some photos of your setup on here we might be able to see any areas that are insecure.

The only thing that came to mind is that if you have weldmesh has the fox forced its way in losening the staples.  The weldmesh would spring back and might look secure.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on April 11, 2012, 15:39
I just spotted foxy across the field, probably eyeing our set up. The hens were out on the roadside with Ben, so he rounded them up and in they went.

I was about to take Ben and Bessie over the field to see him off (well Ben would) when he departed into the bog.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on April 11, 2012, 15:55
You never know Thrift, fox might have been on the menu when Bessie was homeless!  :unsure:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on April 12, 2012, 19:36
 :ohmy: :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: isobel on April 15, 2012, 21:19
Having lost my cockerel Percy who laid down his life defending his gels last week I have finally relented and bought some electric fencing. I also found one day recently a huge heap of my other cockerel's feathers outside the coop but the bird was inside the coop and no hens missing! Bizarre, no idea how they performed that trick. Unfortunately the electric fence is not very nice for my cats who now can't hunt in their own paddock anymore :( but what else can you do. Wish I could be a fly on the wall when the fox meets the fence!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: natshens on May 20, 2012, 21:51
So sorry to hear you lost Percy:( Bless him for protecting his girls.
 I've gone the electric mesh way too, but being on a city allotment I'm scared of people pinching the power unit at night. We usually get a couple of raids every summer! :(
If I was allowed to camp at the allotment, believe me I would!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on May 22, 2012, 07:42
We had a fox attack on Saturday and lost one hen. She was a black banty and called Miss Marple because she was so nosey - she was the only one that had a name. The fox attacked at 7.00 on the morning so it was broad daylight - OH was going to fill the coal bucket and he heard the commotion - he was just in time to see the fox escape over the fence with the hen.  :(  The hens were very nervous all day Saturday and Sunday but seem to have settled now.

One of the ducks was slightly injured - we think he might have been trying to protect his lady duck - we managed to catch him and he had just a slight injury - seems to be healing well. 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on May 22, 2012, 20:04
 :(  Sorry to hear that Springlands.  I hope that he makes a quick recovery.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on May 23, 2012, 10:27
Hi ANHBUC - he seems to be back to normal - chasing flies and butterflies and being VERY friendly with his lady duck.  :)  The hens and ducks were very nervous for the first couple of days but seem to be settling down again. They have a new friend - we have a small wild rabbit who wanders up to the wire fencing of the run and watches the hens - and the hens come along and watch the rabbit. It is so funny to watch them just staring at each other for ages.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on May 23, 2012, 10:37
Nice to hear your good news.   :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on May 25, 2012, 19:07
Sorry to hear about the attack Springlands ...... lucky the predator was interrupted or it might have been much worse.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on May 26, 2012, 09:03
Sorry to hear about the attack Springlands ...... lucky the predator was interrupted or it might have been much worse.

Thank you Thrift - it is not nice to lose a hen like that but at least our drake has recovered - watched him chasing lots of butterflies yesterday.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning.
Post by: bennyjet on July 01, 2012, 21:08
how deep will a fox dig to get in a run? i've buried wire a foot deep all around AND have planks at the base of the welded mesh sides. I've covered the run with wire too so the only way a fox could get in is underneath.

A fox wont generally dig in very far, infact the best and easiest way to stop a fox from getting into a pen / digging under is to lay the bottom piece of chicken mesh in an "L" shape so that it creates an apron arround the outside of the pen about 18 inches to 2 feet wide (in other words bend the mesh into the "L" shape and put the bottom part of the "L" on the ground and the upright part of the "L" forms the first part of the fence.

A fox may try to dig at the fence but will give up when it feels the mesh (may even hurt its little feet a bit!) and wont think dig further back to find the edge of the mesh.

This saves a lot of digging and the mesh wont rot as fast as it would if it was under ground.

An old Gamekeeper taught me this trick!

No need for digging and no need for expensive electric fences around hen and pheasant pens.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Chicken_Lover on July 22, 2012, 16:45
Thank god the winter is over again and we can enjoy the lovely weather with our chooks, but still be on guard guys, my neighbor lost a lot of chooks to foxes last summer.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on July 22, 2012, 19:51
foxes are around all the time and not just winter. Once they know that you have chickens they will visit and not just the once - they will come back again in a few days. Mink are no different - after having had 3 mink attacks last year my hens no longer free range - I managed to find it's larder in the middle of the field next to us which contained 6 of my birds  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Chicken_Lover on July 22, 2012, 20:18
Sorry to hear that joyfull  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on July 22, 2012, 21:20
That is awfull joyfull.  Have you managed to trap any yet?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on July 22, 2012, 21:25
no my hens are all now in a fully enclosed run which isn't what I really wanted but since doing that I have had no more sightings and no sign of any rats either  :).
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on July 23, 2012, 09:35
Sorry you've had to confine your hens joyfull ...... I bet they're slightly miffed about that.

Ours are currently free ranging for a few hours a day with Ben as minder. However there is always the odd fox about at all hours of the day. Luckily Ben ( and Bessie, hence the toe damage ) have spotted them and seen them off.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: fraggle69 on September 26, 2012, 23:22
wonder if foxes can throw themselves through glass.  I know it's not mink proof yet, but this is mk1 greenhouse run oZZ_9sx63xs
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: rhysdad on October 11, 2012, 13:17
Lost two of my three beautiful girls last night. My fault as I'd forgotten to put the door to the ark back on. So angry at myself and so pleased Riley (my middle boy) didn't do his usual egg collection as he'd have been horrified at two headless hens :-( I've identified where foxy got in and have reinforced the fence but so very gutted. They were great girls and excellent layers. Got to break the news now to a four and six year old.....
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on October 11, 2012, 14:04
My garden isn't very big so I foxproofed all of it.  The PVC coated weldmesh is barely visible so easy to look at and so worth it for the peace of mind.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Norfolkian on October 22, 2012, 12:02

And we thought foxes were bad.... Bears seem to be worse

http://www.agrisellex.co.uk/blog/?p=260
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Libby on October 26, 2012, 13:07
I had fox walk into the garden at 10.00 am on Sunday morning, whilst I was standing next to the chickens' run having a chat with them  :ohmy:

He dived at my other run, which houses my injured ex-battery hen and the poor little thing screamed the place down.  I ran at him and chased him all over the garden - roaring - don't know why - just seemed right at the time  :tongue2:

Glad they were in the run, as he was next to me before I knew it and I wouldn't have been able to protect all of them.

No doubt he will be back, but I scared him to death that day at least.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: ANHBUC on October 26, 2012, 13:57
I had fox walk into the garden at 10.00 am on Sunday morning, whilst I was standing next to the chickens' run having a chat with them  :ohmy:

He dived at my other run, which houses my injured ex-battery hen and the poor little thing screamed the place down.  I ran at him and chased him all over the garden - roaring - don't know why - just seemed right at the time  :tongue2:

Glad they were in the run, as he was next to me before I knew it and I wouldn't have been able to protect all of them.

No doubt he will be back, but I scared him to death that day at least.

You will have to get some lions poo to put in the garden.  It is supposed to scare the fox away and you have already done your lion impression so you are half way there!!   ::) :lol:

Glad your girls are safe and hopefully he will go and find easier prey.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Libby on October 26, 2012, 14:31
I think you are right - I shall see if Dudley Zoo can help our as they are only down the road  :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: upert on January 28, 2013, 20:06
I regularly see foxes about as late as 3pm in the afternoon at the moment. Earlier it's like Fox Central. I've found their footprints in the snow around my run so my poultry must be getting a fright.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on January 28, 2013, 22:36
We have ruddy Ninja  foxes.
In the snow we could see their footsteps over next doors roof. 
We could also see where they went in our garden and they are obviously giving the electric fence a very wide berth thank goodness.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Hen 1-0 Fox on January 29, 2013, 01:31
Next door has had a hen taken by the fox, he has an insecure setup and hen was taken about 1600hrs. This means I've now become over protective of mine and they've spent most of the last week in their walk in run. Shame the fox has a taste for birds now and will surely be back.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Debbieta on January 30, 2013, 19:31
Hi,
We often have upto 4 adult foxes in our garden and by morning have to side step their 'deposits'.  So far we have been lucky, although the shed and run are pretty impregable.  When we watch them (so far) they haven't seemed too bothered with the chicken 'corner' but wouldn't let them out to wander unattended as we can't be too sure how close they are during the day as we are in the middle of  nowhere and all manner of wildlife suddenly appear!
Is there ever a quite time of year when foxes aren't such a nuisance?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on January 31, 2013, 15:03
Unfortunately no - whilst you have hens there is always a danger from foxes if the hens are not adequately protected.  :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Sue33 on January 31, 2013, 15:20
we had a fox in our garden at 11am last Sunday, I went down to let the chickens out and it was behind the pampas grass, gave me the shock of my life, if it hadn't moved I would have had no idea, not sure if it was sleeping or lurking  >:(  managed to shut the girls back in their run and it skipped over the fence - really shook me up though.  The girls weren't making a fuss at all that's why I think it may have slept there all night and I woke it up  :unsure:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 10, 2013, 13:14
Just out of interest, does rat poison have any affect on foxes ?

The foxes were over the bins last night and were raking over the rat poison boxes
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 11, 2013, 05:37
no idea - it may depend on what type. It would be best to contact the manufacturer but please do not use it for something that it wasn't intended for.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nerdle on February 11, 2013, 08:32
Well foxproofed Mrs B!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 11, 2013, 08:46
no idea - it may depend on what type. It would be best to contact the manufacturer but please do not use it for something that it wasn't intended for.

Not my bins or bait boxes, they belong to the flats across the road, the bins are like a dumpster, got lids on em, but the foxes get in and bring out rubbish bags and scatter them all over, there isnt supposed to be food put in bags, but they still put it in there, the bait boxes were topped up on Friday, dont kknow what bait they used but it attracted the attention of the foxes, hence my question does rat bait kill or affect them ?
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 11, 2013, 08:54
We try to stay vigilant too and check the electric fence daily to make sure it is working properly. There are so many of the darn things  near us.

My sister has hens and she has lost three lots to foxes despite having an electric fence.

We went to the expense of putting prikka strips on the top of all our 6 foot fences to stop the foxes scrambling over them but to no avail. They continue to scramble over them.

Maybe Boris will be doing something about the excess of foxes in London after the dreadful fox attack on the little boy.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 11, 2013, 09:02
Maybe Boris will be doing something about the excess of foxes in London after the dreadful fox attack on the little boy.

I doubt it very much, he was in favour of the hunt banb, cant see him getting anyone to trap, kill old brer fox, even the councils arent bothered about the fox population around now, they think they are 'cute'

It wasnt the first attack, it wont be the last
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 11, 2013, 10:18
Unfortunately I don't think it will be the last either. :(

I have just investigated the cost for getting pest control to trap and 'humanely' dispose of a fox and it is very expensive; between £50 to a £100. :(

Not too sure about Boris tho'. There seem to be hidden depths there underneath the buffoon topping.
Maybe I am being optomistic about him doing something :(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Thrift on February 11, 2013, 13:57
I can't believe the number of people who don't believe that the baby was attacked by a fox. We all know just how brazen and fearless they can be.

They are bad enough in the country but I can well imagine how inured they become to the human species when born and reared in town.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: finleyfreyaseth on February 11, 2013, 18:47
my chooks are on the allotment and you see local foxes all time of day ,one day last week bout 9am i was up there as usual to check and feed water etc,my run door is one that opens in 2 halfs id done the chooks and i quite often leave top half open why im there ,i was in my shed when sensed something looked round and big dog fox was walkin up my path not 10 ft from chooks and me shed next to them,so nothing does suprise me .
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 11, 2013, 18:59
I listened to the news tonight, it looks like its all our fault these foxes are out there

These foxes have bred under sheds, in sheds, green houses, they have been treated like pets, people dont cover their bins with a heavy enough lids, they have been treated like pets, even fed by some

A muppet said that a cull of foxes isnt required, they are not a threat to people or pets

If foxes are seeen the councils wont touch them, but they advise a professional is contacted (at your cost)

So if you do have foxes and they are taking your hens, pets, its YOUR problem, not any official body (like the local council)

I wonder how that Mum feels about her baby now ?

I thought I remember reading about foxes coming into peoples homes and biting other kids some time back or am I wrong ?



.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 12, 2013, 09:29
We were yelling at the guy on the news last night too and OH emailed the program he was so angry.

We must all keep our doors and windows closed must we. :mad:

And yes you are right about the foxes getting in and mauling  2 twins.

No one would stand for wild dogs getting into our homes and gardens so why must we put up with foxes who are wild dogs.

Actually some councils do get in and shoot them. A friend of mine lives in Essex and told me about the posters they put up warning residents that a cull would be happening.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 12, 2013, 09:51
While I wasnt in favour of a hunting ban on foxes, its always been an ineffective way of killing them, it was just a jolly for horses and dogs, they did kill a few,not many though, but now they can breed without  any hinderance,

I think attacks will get more as they get used to people even more

They shoot, poison, use anything in Australia to get rid of them, they hate them more than dingos

They (foxes) have lost their fear of people, they live on what we chuck out, so its about food, they get plenty, they breed more, no natraul predators to keep their numbers dowm vets treating them, they should just put em down, they are vermin, just bigger rats

That is nice to hear that at least someone is culling them, I hope it spreads to my way



.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 12, 2013, 10:16
Hope it spreads my way too. There are so many  :blink: :blink:

There was a picture on the net showing an enormous dog fox that a vet  had put down which was pictured next to his son and was about half as big again as his son. With all the food available to them in the towns it would appear that they are getting bigger :ohmy:

An Aussie friend of mine told me about the way they deal with the dingos and foxes. They have a novel way with the giant toads too.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: pepsi100 on February 12, 2013, 10:29
An Aussie friend of mine told me about the way they deal with the dingos and foxes. They have a novel way with the giant toads too.

Oh yes, cane toad golf or cricket, a great sport, and you are never too old or too young to play it ;)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 12, 2013, 12:00
An Aussie friend of mine told me about the way they deal with the dingos and foxes. They have a novel way with the giant toads too.

Oh yes, cane toad golf or cricket, a great sport, and you are never too old or too young to play it ;)

Oh yes, those are the ones. ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Agatha on February 12, 2013, 13:12
A big dog fox ran at me last year while I was walking Bonnie - I charged at him, yelling loudly and he ran when I was about 5 feet away.  I was really relieved as he could have done both of us a lot of damage.  We were in a really open area, so it wasn't that he felt trapped and had to attack to defend himself - he obviously just didn't like us being on 'his' land.  And one of my friends has had a chicken taken from her flock while she was standing there - the fox just charged in, grabbed one and ran away again before she could stop him!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Sparkyrog on July 16, 2013, 21:15
The reason being they no longer have any reason to fear humans in urban areas !
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: jacquil58 on November 03, 2013, 09:44
We had a fox attack in June this year and it killed a chicken which I had hand reared from 1 day old.  We were so upset but fortunately it didn't get my others because my daughter heard the commotion and frightened the fox off.  I have always been against fox hunting and thought it cruel but after seeing what they can do first hand, I could have cheerfully finished the thing off if I could have caught it!

I live in northwest England and we've been advised not to let them free in the garden until at least 9:30 am.  I love living in the countryside but this year has shown it's downside.  I hope you have a fox free winter and wish you well.

Jacqui
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on February 09, 2014, 17:39
My OH heard the magpies screeching at about 3 this afternoon. He was in the bath and asked me to check what was going on. The chickens and ducks were all lined up looking out of their run. At first I could not see anything but then at the top end of the garden spotted a Fox looking back at the hens. I ran out but the Fox was quite brazen and watched me approach before running off. Good job our hen run resembles Colditz.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: upert on May 30, 2014, 20:02
We will probably end up killing all wildlife that impinges on our lives.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on May 31, 2014, 07:18
We will probably end up killing all wildlife that impinges on our lives.

Yes , that is the way of most territorial animals. If it is a problem we get rid of .

Fleas , slugs , rats, wolves all have the same rights to life as us but when it comes to the crunch people that do not control pests (and their neighbours) will lose out.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: robbiejormerod on November 12, 2014, 23:41
This might not be suitable for everyone, but I have a security guard for my chickens. She generally patrols the outside of the run, but does like to pop in from time to time to make sure that everything is in order.  :D
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on November 13, 2014, 17:07
Awww, how lovely is that. :lol: :lol:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: barley on November 13, 2014, 18:43
bless her

my little one not only guards our chooks she thinks she is one LOL

(http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/oo204/julie456/101_4434-2.jpg) (http://s376.photobucket.com/user/julie456/media/101_4434-2.jpg.html)

Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 23, 2015, 10:10
Oh well I suppose it had to happen. We have 2 foxes that make free in our garden at all times of the night and day, and up to now the electric fence has kept the girls safe. Damn things are totally fearless.

All I can say is thank heavens Mr Bee woke up early and was able to save most of our girls. We lost Daisy an old girl and Inky a new girl and Mr Bee has taken to his bed with a sick bucket he is so upset.

I am off to clear up the feathers and entrails. :(

And I thought all was well in the Bee household.


Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Springlands on February 23, 2015, 11:41
Oh I am so sorry to hear about the Fox attack. It is really horrible when it happens.  >:( 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 23, 2015, 12:02
Thanks Springlands. I suppose we have been incredibley lucky that this is the first time anything like this has happened in the 6 years we have had chickens. I was ridiculously upset. I can dispatch sick chickens with no qualms or upset but the thought of that fox getting my healthy girls.......... :( >:( >:( :mad:

Although now that Mr Bee is up and explained what happened and why he went back to bed, I have to admit to there being a grin on my face.

Apparently when he got up at 6.30 and saw the fox with Daisy in his mouth he ran out  in nothing but his  tee shirt and undies and was chasing the fox round the garden to try and get the ****ing fox to drop her.

He was so freezing cold afterwards he felt sick and came back to bed to get warm.

Looking on the bright side, it was fortuitous that he did get up or we would have lost all 11.

The electric fence is definitely not working 'cos I went and grabbed hold of it to test it. Never sure if the little tester gadget really works.
Mr Bee is looking at whether it is the fence or generator that is broken. The girls have the hump at the moment because they are in the smaller eglu enclosure for the time being while we sort this problem.

Oh well, never any chance of there being nothing to do in this house.

And to add insult to injury, the ****ing fox has trashed a patch of my snowdrops and crocus while trying to bury Daisy. Inky was eaten on the spot.

And we have to cover up our pots with garden chairs tipped on their sides to stop them digging them up too.
 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: 8doubles on February 23, 2015, 13:42
Always got be vigilant with charlie, he does not miss a chance !

Sounds like Epping  could do with a few more lads with rifles and night vision scopes ! ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 23, 2015, 14:19
 ::) ::) ::) now there is a thought. :D

New electric energiser will be here in the morning. Until then they are cramped but safe in the inner eglu pen.

Or I hope they are safe in there till the morning.
Irritating thing is we didn't know it was bust until the fox got in.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 23, 2015, 20:37
so sorry, good luck for tonight x
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 23, 2015, 21:04
Thanks Joyful. X
We came back from shopping this evening to find 2 of the little******** roaming around the garden together and the front doorstep stinking of fox urine.

We have been out chasing them away 4 times already this evening. I know it won't do any good but we can't help ourselves. 

The girls are safe for tonight we have shut the door of the eglu cube and know that they will safe until the new electric thingy arrives tomorrow. We are getting one with double the volts this time too.

It is the first time in all the years we have had chickens that this has happened so I suppose that is something to be grateful for. And the second thing to be grateful for is we lost 2 but Mr Bee saved 9 even if he nearly got hypothermia doing it. Still don't know why he didn't shout for me to come and help; daft devil.

Things seem to be getting worse here with foxes and there were 10 of them roaming around here in the Summer.  >:(
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 23, 2015, 21:44
Oh yes, and despite it all the girls still managed to lay 6 eggs today, bless 'em. :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 23, 2015, 22:28
after having had a couple of mink attacks in the past I really do feel for you.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: barley on February 24, 2015, 06:10
Know it doesn't help but its just nature unfortunately  :(

being a ground living bird it's inevitable it will happen

we prided our selves on a fox safe environment with fences to put any prison to shame only to loose one to a swooping buzzard !!!!!

so sorry anyway xxx

 
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 27, 2015, 00:12
Well the electric fence is fixed and up and running thank goodness.

Mr Bee was worried that the layout of the fence needs changing as he is worried that the electric charge is not strong enough.

I watched the pair of foxes prowling towards the hens enclosure and watched in delight as the fox jumped back about 4 foot as it got hold of the fence. :D They went round the enclosure several times and then slung their hooks.

I think the electric charge is strong enough. So glad we got one with a much stronger charge.

Girls are really happy to be out in the run again and rewarded us with 9 eggs.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: joyfull on February 27, 2015, 07:25
remember to keep checking it and also keep any grass around it very short  :)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on February 27, 2015, 10:15
Thanks Joyful. Will do.

We only have a little grass up to the enclosure, so it might be worth cutting out a fire break so to speak.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nannytroll on April 29, 2015, 10:33
Reynard paid me a visit last night, tunnelled under buried wire to get into the coop and killed 6 hens plus their coq. The irony is they free range during the day and should have been safely tucked up. :(. I keep my birds in 2 separate coops, and let 1 group out on alternate days, just in case someting like this happens. The pens are roofed with fishing net to protect from Pine Martens, which are a real problem here. Sometimes poultry keeping, and gardening seem like open warfare!
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on April 29, 2015, 10:52
So sorry Nanny. That is awful for you. I know just how you feel. :(

And you are right about chicken keeping and gardening being like open warfare.  :(

We just have to keep fighting back.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: nannytroll on May 01, 2015, 12:01
My Peahen has just started sitting on 6 peggs. She's in a fully -fenced pen, with her mate to protect her, and the whole lot surrounded by 7 strands of leccy tape connected to the mains energiser!! Do you think that's OTT ? :unsure:
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on May 01, 2015, 19:40
Not OTT at all. Most sensible. Perhaps a Brenn gun at the ready too.

Lets hope that keeps your predators away.
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: New shoot on September 19, 2015, 09:16
We had a young fox in the garden the other day, which I chased off.  It was back in the wee small hours this morning and woke me up, as I could hear something in the garden.  It fled as soon as I put the downstairs lights on, but this morning has revealed footprints all over the cover of Alphie's run and an attempt to dig under the eglu.

Fear not fans of the small white wonder.  He slept through the lot and is up and about strutting his stuff without a care this morning :lol:

I'm going to get some wire mesh for the house to sit on to deter the fox, but be warned folks.  Darker mornings and evenings, plus young foxes dispersing isn't a happy mix for poultry keepers  ::)
Title: Re: Fox Attacks Warning. It's that time of year again.
Post by: Mrs Bee on September 19, 2015, 19:38
Darker evenings and mornings!!!!! :mad:

We have them all day every day in broad daylight and in the evening throughout the year.

Totally fearless of humans, screaming and fighting in the middle of the night and early morning, wrecking gardens and defecating in the garden, in front of the garage doors and  all over the front garden so it got trodden in the house.

And where we are there are loads of them.

We have moved to the upstairs bedroom in our bungalow and the other night one of them walked past and stuck its nose in the open window. I have seen one walking on the very top of next doors bungalow and sit there screaming. :mad: :mad: :mad:

The majority of the neighbours are sick of them.

Scuse the rant. Hope you keep your fox away from Alphie, New Shoot.