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Author Topic: Recipe Competition #4 - June & July - Seasonal Recipes Grown in Britain  (Read 14193 times)

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John

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We're looking for more recipes that are wholesome and seasonal with main ingredients that are grown in Britain

The best recipes will be put on the recipe pages of the site.

We have another 3 copies of the Dorling Kindersley recipe book, Grown in Britain Cookbook to give away. There's a recipe from the book on the web site: Asparagus Cream Cheese Quiche

The competition is open to all members and you may enter more than one recipe. The winner will be chosen by Allotment Growing at the end of July

The Legal Stuff

By entering you agree to grant to the allotment growing website group including sub-domains and associated sites thereof a non-exclusive licence to publish and use your recipe and extracts from your recipe on the site.

The prize must be taken as stated and cannot be deferred. There will be no cash alternative. Prize(s) unclaimed after 28 days will be deemed to have been forfeited and Allotment Growing reserves the right to offer the prize to another entrant. The winner will need to provide their name and address in order to receive their prize.

Recipes should be in line with the theme of the competition. Entries that do not comply in the sole opinion of Allotment Growing will not be eligible. The decision of Allotment Growing to accept or reject an entry is final. No correspondence will be entered into.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2009, 19:29 by John »
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Glyn

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Jerusalem Artichoke And Carrot Salad

400 g carrots, well scrubbed and trimmed
400 g Jerusalem artichokes, well scrubbed
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or tarragon
2 tablespoons olive oil or walnut oil
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed
Salt and pepper to taste

   
Method 
Whisk together the herbs, oil, lemon juice and capers; season to taste with salt and pepper.
Set aside.
Grate, shred or julienne the carrots and place in a large bowl.
Thinly slice or julienne the Jerusalem artichokes (or cut into thin matchsticks); add to the carrots, and immediately add the vinaigrette and toss together.
Cover and let it sit at room temperature for 30 minutes, before tossing again and serving.
 
 It is delicious with a toasted cheese sandwich or with potatoes.

mumofstig

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Greek style Courgette and cheese pie

Ingredients
2 tbsp. plain bread crumbs
2 tsp. vegetable oil
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
2 cups grated courgette
1 clove minced garlic
3 eggs
1 cup low-fat cottage cheese
1 tbsp. cornflour
1 dessertspoon choppped fresh oregano or teaspoon dried
pinch salt
pinch pepper
small pinch of cinnamon
1 cup grated cheese cheese


Directions
Grease a 9" pie plate, sprinkle it with bread crumbs and set it aside. Heat oil in a large non-stick pan. Add onion and cook over medium heat for 4 minutes, stirring often. Add courgette and garlic. Cook 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes. Preheat oven  gas 4, 180C .

Combine eggs, cottage cheese, cornflour, oregano, salt, pepper, and cinnamon. Stir  until smooth.

In a large bowl, combine cooked vegetables, cottage cheese/egg mixture and cheddar. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 30 minutes or until knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.
Lesley
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I'm not good, I'm not bad, I'm just me - and sometimes I have to apologise for that.

agingchick

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ELDERFLOWER CORDIAL

20 Heads of elderflowers
1.8g of sugar
1.5litres of water
2 lemons, zested and sliced
75g citric acid

Put water and sugar into a large pan,dissolve over a low heat then bring to the boil.
put the flower heads, lemon zest and lemon slices into a large bowl, pour over sugar syrup and stir in citric acid, cover and leave for 24 hours sieve through a muslin cloth and bottle.

I am sat drinking this as I write it is very refreshing with tonic water and ice.
Diane
I use to be indecisive now I'm not so sure

lina

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Masfouf - Couscous with Broad Beans and Peas

This simple vegetarian recipe was donated by my husband Mo, and is eaten in Algeria when the ful (broadbeans) and djalbana (peas) are harvested.

This is a fabulous dish if you are a legume lover. Im sure it could be adapted with mange tout and other beans but I would be breaking cultural copyright laws! 

The quantities are a bit approximate for this as it tends to change on what ratio beans to peas you have...

500g of medium or fine couscous. Dont skimp on a cheap brand as it turns to mush.
250g of fresh broad beans. If the bean pods are new and soft, slice into 2cm chunks.  If the skins are tough and stringy then shell them and use the bean.
250g of fresh shelled peas
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper.
Yogurt and milk in equal quantity for the Raib.

Method

Put the dry couscous in a large bowl and pour in cold water to a level of 2cm above the couscous. Cover with tea towel and leave for a few minutes to swell. Meanwhile lightly steam the peas and beans - do not overcook.

Stir the couscous with a fork to separate the grains and then add bit more water and cover again for a few minutes. The trick with good couscous is not to add too much water or it ends up like semolina. North Africans do not pour boiling water onto their couscous like rehydrating pot noodle! Try to keep the grains separate.

Steam the couscous for 15 minutes until light and fluffy. Return the couscous to the bowl and stir in the steamed peas and beans. Add a generous glug of olive oil some salt and stir until the legumes are well mixed.

Serve hot in a shallow dish or plate. Some of the beans can be used to decorate the top of the pile of couscous.

To make the Raib, mix equal quantities of milk and plain yoghurt and liquidise or shake vigorously. Serve cold in a glass to accompany the meal. Bon appetite!

home made pie

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Easy Peasy Pasta Sauce

1 good handful of tomatoes
1 sweet pepper
1 chilli (optional if you like it spicy)
1 onion
1 or 2 garlic bulbs
some basil leaves

Chop up all the above HOME GROWN  :) produce to roughly the size of a pea

Season with salt & black pepper

Roast at 160 degrees in some olive oil until all nicely softened

Transfer to a pan on the hob, pick out the tomato skins and add tomato puree and tinned plumb tomatoes (optional but useful to make it go further and makes it more saucy) and 1 small teaspoon of sugar

Continue to cook and adjust seasoning to taste, adding any further ingredients such as a few chopped black olives or thinly sliced mushroom

Serve spooned on top of freshly cooked pasta and finish with parmeson or grated cheese


Here's one I just made tonight  :)







Yorkie

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Masfouf - Couscous with Broad Beans and Peas

Put the dry couscous in a large bowl and pour in cold water to a level of 2cm above the couscous. Cover with tea towel and leave for a few minutes to swell. Meanwhile lightly steam the peas and beans - do not overcook.

Stir the couscous with a fork to separate the grains and then add bit more water and cover again for a few minutes. The trick with good couscous is not to add too much water or it ends up like semolina. North Africans do not pour boiling water onto their couscous like rehydrating pot noodle! Try to keep the grains separate.

Steam the couscous for 15 minutes until light and fluffy. Return the couscous to the bowl and stir in the steamed peas and beans. Add a generous glug of olive oil some salt and stir until the legumes are well mixed.


Hi Lisa, thanks for posting this.  I'm just a little confused about what to do with the cous cous, in particular the steaming bit.  Could you clarify this for me please?

Once the cold water has been added to the cc, and topped up, how do you then steam it?  Do you put all the cold water and cc into an empty saucepan, or something else?  Just can't quite picture how to steam fine cous cous without it falling through the gaps in the steamer.

ta
I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days all attack me at once...

lina

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Hi Yorkie

The couscous should have been partially hydrated by the cold water. Then put it in a normal metal steamer over boiling water until fully hydrated. Inevitably a little falls through the holes - but it should be solid enough to hold in there!

Hope this helps - if not I'll ask the man himself to explain.

Lx
« Last Edit: July 01, 2009, 21:40 by lina »

Yorkie

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Thanks Lina  :D

Might use my metal sieve rather than steamer with big holes but it's clear now what I'm trying to do ... mmmmmm  ::)

poultrygeist

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My darling wife's entry...

Pea Soup

2lb peas and pods
1.5pts water
1 spring onion
lettuce leaves
salt and pepper
1 tbs cornflour
10fl oz milk
half tsp chopped mint

Wash the pea pods. Bring water to the boil. Add peas, pods, spring onion and the lettuce leaves. Season. Boil for 30 minutes. Liquidise. Mix cornflour with the milk  until smooth. Add to the soup and bring back to the boil for 2-3 minutes. Add mint and serve.

Rob 8)

poultrygeist

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And another.....


Vegetable Pasty

makes 4
350 g (12 oz) shortcrust pastry
8 oz (225 g) potatoes
salt and pepper
1 onion
8 oz (225 g) mixed vegetables,e.g. carrots, peas, beans etc.


1. Peel or prepare all the vegetables, cutting the root vegetables into small cubes.

2. Put the vegetables into water and bring to the boil, simmer for 10 minutes, then drain well and season.

3. Divide the pastry into four pieces and roll each piece into a circle about 20 cm (8 in) across. Divide the vegetables between the pastry rounds, dampen the edges and draw the edges of the pastry together to form a seam across the top; pinch the edges together with your ringers to give a fluted edge. Place on a baking tray and cook at the top of the oven for 15 minutes at 200C, 400F, mark 6, then reduce the heat to 180C, 350F, mark 4 and bake for a further 45 minutes. Serve hot or cold.

Rob 8)

poultrygeist

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Summer Pudding

Stale bread and breadcrumbs
Mixture of currants and berries (elder/red/blackcurrants, raspberries, strawberries)
Sugar to taste
 
Warm and mash some of the berries and currants to release to juices, add sugar to taste. Line a basin with bread strips that have been dipped in the juices. Warm the rest of the berries and currants in the remaining juice (if there is any). Sweeten to taste. Fill a third of the bowl with the fruit. Add a layer of breadcrumbs and repeat until the bowl is full and finish with a round of bread.

Put a saucer on the top of the pudding and weight down. Leave overnight. Next day, run a knife round the edge of the pudding and turn onto a dish. Leave the pudding upside down to loosen itself for an hour. Give it a quick shake to release it. Cover with any left over fruit and juices.

Rob 8)

poultrygeist

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Blackberry Leaf Tea

Pick tender green leaves when dry. Cut them up and spread out to dry, this may take up to four days. Dont dry them in the sun. Store them in an airtight tin and turn out frequently to air and prevent from going mouldy. Use as ordinary tea. If you like your tea strong, boil it for 5 minutes after making. Serve without milk.

Rob 8)

poultrygeist

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Last one...


Lavender Tea Cake

180ml milk
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh lavender
6 tablespoons butter, softened
200g caster sugar
2 eggs
250g plain flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Preheat the oven to 170 C / Gas mark 3. Grease and flour a 23x13cm loaf tin.
 
2. Combine the milk and lavender in a small saucepan over medium heat. Heat to a simmer, then remove from heat, and allow to cool slightly.

3. In a medium bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the egg until the mixture is light and fluffy. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; stir into the creamed mixture alternately with the milk and lavender until just blended. Pour into the prepared tin.

4. Bake for 50 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a skewer inserted into the crown of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the tin on a wire rack.

Rob 8)

joyfull

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think I'm going to come round to your place you have some really nice recipes there  :D
Staffies are softer than you think.



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