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Author Topic: Aminopyralid - Persistent Herbicide In Manure Causes Problems with Crops  (Read 40873 times)

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ge0ff

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  • My own potato, destroyed by herbicide in manure
Zippy's 'veganic' route does sound interesting. I too would like to know more - I suppose it's just a click away, so I must get clicking.

...and thanks for the information Nobbie. Everything you say is right. Sorry for not having replied sooner, but I haven't been around for a few days.  ::)
« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 18:53 by Aunt Sally »
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glallotments

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I've just been alerted to the contents of this thread and like others are really sorry that you have been affected. It will be no consolation but you are not on your own at having been affected this year. See this list on my website: http://glallotments.co.uk/Manure2011.aspx
It seems it is usually around this time of year that the problem surfaces.

One thing to bear in mind is that testing isn't foolproof as the chemical is only released once soil microbes break down the manure and also some piles of manure may contain only parts affected if for instance the animals have been fed different fodder.

You shouldn't be complacent if you find a good source of manure as all it needs is for the supplier to change his fodder supplire or the supplier to change the source of feed materials. Even though animal feed should be longer be affected it seems that this is still happening.

The new stewardship should have meant that no fresh manure should be affected but reports seem to suggest that new manure is being contaminated in some way. As for well rotted stacked manure this can hold on to the contamination for several years. It's only contact with the soil that will break down the herbicide contained within.

If you are unsure of what the problem looks like I have loads of photos on my website. Some are taken of my own plants and many others have been sent to me by other victims.

As for courgettes being affected - some plants are more susceptible than others. Some such as potatoes, tomatoes and beans are sensitive at extremely low levels of contamination but at higher levels other plants will be affected. As far as I am aware the only plant family that tolerates the chemical completely is the grass family including cereal crops and sweet corn.
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ge0ff

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This topic has been dormant for a while but, just like aminopyralid, it's been lurking in the background, waiting to rear its ugly head again.

I've just visited your website glallotments and your list of tales of woe has brought it all to the surface again. I agree with your comment about the curious paradox of Dow Agrosciences volunteering to remove contaminated manure but washing their hands of any responsibility. Doesn't quite add up, does it? I wonder, have they decided that this is the cheapest way to contain the problem (ie helping infected individuals), whilst keeping what may well be a highly profitable stable of products on the market?

Many of my crops are still showing signs of poisoning. I'm 'looking forward' to digging up a potato plant to inspect the crop in a few weeks time. As for the tomatoes, will their fruit look as weird as their leaves? Time will tell.

Vit

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All this story have "bad smell", because big chemical business involved :blush:. This "accident" remind me a story about DDT. Feels very sorry for people, who been affected. What i can say - first put some <censored LOL> into the food chain, then say "No, you shouldn't use animal waste for fertilizing, because bla-bla-bla. Use these magic powder/granules/liquid". Simple. :blush:
1)Wiki does not provide any info, how long this chemical decomposing in the soil.
2)Any "antidot" for this substance avaliable?
3)Any other tests apart form "bean test"?

BabbyAnn

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1)Wiki does not provide any info, how long this chemical decomposing in the soil.
2)Any "antidot" for this substance avaliable?
3)Any other tests apart form "bean test"?

1)  I think there is information available in previous posts and on site.  Generally it can be in the soil for up to 3 years but the decomposition can be speeded up if the soil is turned over regularly.  This incorporates air and redistributes it (a dilution effect if you want another word) and allows soil bacteria to help break it down.
2)  No antidote - avoid growing broad leafed plants (which restricts you to things like alliums and sweetcorn) in in the affected area
3)  The "bean test" is ideal for amateur gardeners who don't have access to expensive analysis tests - a bean plant can grow quickly in a pot containing the contaminated soil in the warmth of a sunny windowsill, and any deformities in its development should be detected reasonably quickly.


ge0ff

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And to BabyAnn - nice answers - you hit the nail on the head. Our onions are showing no sign of any problems. However, I reckon that it may well be possible for it to remain in the soil for longer than 3 years - possibly considerably longer.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 18:55 by Aunt Sally »

mumofstig

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However, I reckon that it may well be possible for it to remain in the soil for longer than 3 years - possibly considerably longer.

What makes you say that?.............I've not seen anything that suggests thats the case
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Pompey Spud

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However, I reckon that it may well be possible for it to remain in the soil for longer than 3 years - possibly considerably longer.

What makes you say that?.............I've not seen anything that suggests thats the case

Exactly MoS.

Geoff you have my sympathy with your plight. However, you're confusing fact with assumptions again and potentially leaving this site open for legal action.

My own personal view is it's a shame you didn't carry out all this effort into gaining knowledge about working a plot from the start.
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lazydog

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I think this needs be kept at the top and thanks to Geoff for bringing it up again,as someone else said this stinks big corporation but why for hells sake did the goverbent not ban it this will be a problem until the  license runs out,IRC 7 years time before it is due for renewel!
Also the same pile of manure can vary from top to bottom of the pile so one plot holder may be ok but the next will not be.
If someone like me needs tons of soil conditioner/fertilizer what are we supposed to do this is the food chain and nobody in the right place seems to really care except about money! :mad:   
If God didn't want us to eat animals, he wouldn't have made them out of food

Aunt Sally

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This is a very valuable discussion so has been turned into an information topic in our Information section.

If anyone has any new information to add to the topic please contact Admin. (John or me) or a moderator.

John's info here
http://www.allotment-garden.org/grow-your-own/garden-diary/2010-03/contaminated-manure-fertilisers

If you're getting some manure for your plot or strange growing problems, do read up on it.




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« Last Edit: August 22, 2012, 13:50 by mumofstig »
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