Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 

News:

How to Post Pictures on the forums.


Author Topic: Aminopyralid - Persistent Herbicide In Manure Causes Problems with Crops  (Read 40872 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Gwiz

  • Guest
We get free manure at our allotment.
and usually it's all good stuff.
the latest batch, however, has some chemical in it which has caused wilting and dying off of my spuds.
we sent some of the spuds and manure off to wisley for analysis, who confirm it's the manure that has caused the problem.
the other plot holders who it has happened to, are displeased as well.....
oh well, still time to put in some extra beans, I suppose. :roll:


John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
I've renamed the topic because so many people are being hit with this problem this year and it will be easier to find.

Apparently some new herbicide is being used for dockleaves and other weeds in straw and possibly silage so it's getting into the manure and thence continues its work It seems to affect a wide range of crops, potatoes, beans, tomatoes.

One chap nearby to me says his plot is half dead. The half that was manured.

This is really serious for all home growers and ironically more so for organic growers who are more dependent on manure for their fertility.

There is another question - are the partially affected crops safe to eat?

Since most of us source our manure from normal farmers who could be inadvertantly supplying poisonous manure and the organic farmers don't tend to dispose of their manure we could all be having to think hard about how we grow now.

Anyone with more info (thanks gobs for your input) and suggestions how to handle this, please post.
Check out our books - ideal presents

John and Val Harrison's Books
 

Gwiz

  • Guest
According to the farmers weekly, the chemical is called Aminopyralid. It is the active ingredient to: Forefront, Halcyon and GF839.

gobs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Chesterfield, UK
  • Posts: 8456
Not at all, John, we were just starting to look into this when Gwiz posted, since then it got confirmed, someone spoke with the farmer, don't know the details yet.

The two active ingredients, aminopyralid or clopyralid seem to be different in consequences, or we just have more experiences of the latter? :?

Somewhat good news, Gwiz, if crop - if any - harmless, not looking tempting, mind. :shock:  :lol:
"Words... I know exactly what words I'm wanting to say, but somehow or other they is always getting squiff-squiddled around." R Dahl

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
I've heard 2nd hand that this chemical is a selective weed killer and that it passes through the cow and is present in the manure (poo rather than the straw)

Anybody else heard this? Anyone know if the soil association or HDRA have any info?

Weessy

  • New Member
  • *
  • Location: Warwickshire
  • Posts: 47
Just read this article in the yorkshire post online, LINK

After having problems with my potatoes, manured, my raspberries, mulched with manure and my runner beans, manure in a large pit under the wigwam, I am getting a bit worried. Does anybody know if or where you can get analysis done? I am a member of garden organic Ryton, was wondering if they might be able to help.

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
I've spent some time looking into this and have been helped by NVS member Dave Hampsey (he's a fantastic grower and has contacts everywhere) - just put up an article about it.

LINKAminopyralid Herbicide Residue in Manure Killing Crops

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
Thanks for that and your informative article.

Now we know what we're dealing with and have some ideas of what to do about it. Precious little, I'm afraid.

I'd describe our chances of getting it withdrawn as poor. Maybe if we had millions to spend we'd have a chance. Don't be surprised if Dow start selling a test kit to detect the damn stuff.

glallotments

  • New Member
  • *
  • Location: Horbury - Wakefield
  • Posts: 36
    • Our plot at Green Lane Allotments
Hi John, It would be good if they could test for the stuff but according to the Pesticide Safety Directorate it is too difficult, too costly and inconclusive! It is a worry that organic farms may have inadvertently sold contaminated manure isn't it?

By the way I put a link to your piece from our webpage too. The more publicity we can get the better - at least gardeners will know to think twice before buying manure.
Visit our blog

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
What's worrying is how powerful it is - the usage rate is 5L per hectare - that's 0.005ml per square metre. One 5ml teaspoon will kill weeds over 10 square metres.

No wonder a 'very low level' residue kills off a plot. It would be nice if we could get some firm information on how long before it was safe.

string bean

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Location: North Lincs
  • Posts: 8
I have a compost bin crammed full of manure which my spuds and runners tell me is causing problems.  How long, I wonder, will it need to stand before it is deemed safe?

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
Quote from: "string bean"
I have a compost bin crammed full of manure which my spuds and runners tell me is causing problems.  How long, I wonder, will it need to stand before it is deemed safe?


2 or 3 years.

You could try putting it on a patch of ground and rotovating it in, repeating the rotovation a few times. This lets the microbes in the soil get at it and break it down. Then it may be OK for next year. May be.

glallotments

  • New Member
  • *
  • Location: Horbury - Wakefield
  • Posts: 36
    • Our plot at Green Lane Allotments
PSD update says affected veg are safe to eat
http://www.pesticides.gov.uk/garden.asp?id=2480

John

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Location: Clogwyn Melyn, Gwynedd
  • Posts: 12858
    • Low Cost Living
Quote from: "glallotments"
PSD update says affected veg are safe to eat
http://www.pesticides.gov.uk/garden.asp?id=2480


Appreciate you posting the update link.

Many people grow their own because they want to grow organically and eat food without residues in them - no matter how safe the government say eating the residues are.

gobs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Location: Chesterfield, UK
  • Posts: 8456
From link above:

'PSD has now assessed additional information from the manufacturer that confirms that using manure, which may contain residues of aminopyralid, does not have implications for human health.

Based on reasonable worst case assumptions: that cattle are only fed grass, or silage made from grass, treated with aminopyralid; that vegetables are grown in soil mixed with manure produced from the animals; and that all the aminopyralid released from the manure is taken up into the plants; the highest residues would not be a concern for health, so vegetables should be safe to eat.'

Ain't that a load of balls?

The manufacturer would say that, they are making profit on it. Who in their sane mind would consider their view as an independent scientific opinion? By the by, defra has got its fair share and financial interest in the trade of agro-chemicals.

Worst case assumptions as stated does not exist on the ground, that statement presents complete ignorance or negligence or both, as luck would have it they just can't exist like that. Much less accumulation and contamination results in complete death of plants or no crop whatsoever. So as such, it is rather safe on that level as there is nought to consume.

 :!:



Share via twitter

xx
CLUBROOT - Brassica Problems

Started by clive f

8 Replies
16058 Views
Last post July 03, 2007, 21:51
by diane g