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Author Topic: keep the proper dates  (Read 279 times)

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RubyR3d

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keep the proper dates
« on: October 28, 2017, 20:00 »
  In asda for the last 3 weeks we have had halloween, bonfire night and Christmas stuff all cheek by plastic jowel with each other in a mosh pit of jumble. Kids are bought advent calenders to eat now with toffee apples etc. It baffles me that though all hallows eve is an actual date 31 st october and bonfire night actually happened on november 5 the people float them to the nearest Saturday. It makes a nonsense of celebrating at all. Yet Christmas is a fixed date of 25th december and nobody would dream of floating this even though out of the 3 celebrations there is no proof in the bible this was the date of jesus at all. It could be said to be a made up date to appease the pagans. People are odd  ???


mjg000

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2017, 21:39 »
It does now seem that the "hallowe'en" celebration is the one that is taking over.  Shops make the most of selling fancy dress costumes and huge boxes of sweet treats. I remember the first hallowe'en trick or treat happening in our (cul de sac) street in the 70's when some English born children returned from Canada and rampaged up and down the street and my kids and all the others were desperate to join in. Bonfire night is now held on the nearest Saturday and is just  a firework display here in West London. There have been a huge number of fireworks tonight (28th Oct) already ( 9.30pm) and we do hear all the Divali fireworks around here too. I wouldn't mind so much if it was a community celebration for each or any of them but I really do feel that it is just a huge marketing exercise to rake money in for the supermarkets.

robinahood

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2017, 06:13 »
I so agree, also fireworks were once let off on 5 November only, which was a special experience.

Goosegirl

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2017, 15:17 »
I remember my dad buying a little box of fireworks and a packet of sparklers. My favourite was the Snowstorm. Like others say, it's all so commercialised and it's not just the various festive seasons but all the flipping cards you can get for every occasion possible. In reality it trashes the whole reason behind why we celebrate certain things. What cards are they going to come up with next and, if we don't buy one and others do, are we going to feel guilty about it? I for one certainly won't but hey, let's do our own. How about cards for gardeners saying "Sorry you've lost your trowel. Poor sod!" For divorces " You've blighted your troth." For coming out "That's a turnip for the book". On your graduation from University "I always said you knew your onions". Finally for when you give your OH an unexpected festive present of a ton of well-rotted manure "Loam, sweet loam".
"Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend." Martin Luther King.

al78

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2017, 14:02 »
For those of us who work during the week, Saturday is a convenient day to participate in the evening bonfire display, if it was in the working week I would not be able to get back from work in time never mind have an evening meal beforehand. Why should the retired and the unemployed have all the fun? It is bad enough with all the other things that interest me that I can't attend because they are during office hours. Christmas is different as it is a national bank holiday and the majority of people (except those in critical jobs) get Christmas day off work, therefore no need to move it to a weekend. Sometimes to appreciate things you have to step outside yourself and look at the bigger (collective) picture.

Elaine G

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2017, 16:53 »
Well said al78, I couldn't agree more.

I am fortunate to be retired now, but my son in law works long hours with over an hour each way commute, rarely being home by 7pm. Rarely seeing the children actually. Should my grandsons be deprived of fireworks because November 5th falls on a weekday?

And yes I remember we had fireworks on 'the night", but my dad's job was max 15 mins away and mum walked to work. Things are different now, sometimes better, sometimes not, but we do need to be more flexible.

The foolish man seeks happiness in the distance, the wise grows it under his feet - James Oppenheim

Aidy

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2017, 13:42 »
Christmas is different as it is a national bank holiday and the majority of people (except those in critical jobs) get Christmas day off work, therefore no need to move it to a weekend.

Bingo, perhaps Nov 5th should be a bank holiday to celebrate the only human being to enter the houses of parliment with honest intentions! (just saying)

We have always celebrated Guy's life on the 5th no matter what day it is on, appreciate what you say Al and the world has changed and it is what it s now.
Punk isn't dead...it's underground where it belongs. If it comes to the surface it's no longer punk...it's Green Day!

RubyR3d

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Re: keep the proper dates
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2017, 19:23 »
For those of us who work during the week, Saturday is a convenient day to participate in the evening bonfire display, if it was in the working week I would not be able to get back from work in time never mind have an evening meal beforehand. Why should the retired and the unemployed have all the fun? It is bad enough with all the other things that interest me that I can't attend because they are during office hours. Christmas is different as it is a national bank holiday and the majority of people (except those in critical jobs) get Christmas day off work, therefore no need to move it to a weekend. Sometimes to appreciate things you have to step outside yourself and look at the bigger (collective) picture.
     so it isn't bonfire night you are celebrating though. With fireworks on sale all year round you could celebrate it anytime. If Christmas wasn't a bank holiday it seems ridiculous to think it would also be floated just because its more convenient. Bet you most kids dont know why bonfire night is celebrated at all. Its probably deemed in appropriate today. A shame that we seem to go from halloween to Christmas because there's more money to be made



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