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Author Topic: Bread the stuff of life  (Read 51112 times)

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tosca100

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2015, 00:53 »
We rely heavily on the internet these dismal winter days, and when it goes off we have no telly, and obviously no skype or any contact with anyone. So I turn to cooking and that is when I start doing flavoured breads. (And cakes) However, as I am supposed to be cutting out butter and cheese in any quantity I have had to reduce these as I can't resist. So today, while I made some cards, I tried pitta breads and was chuffed at how easy and how much better than any I have had before. Made plain white but will go for wholemeal next time. Had to put the extras into the freezer so I don't pick. Hopeless I am.


With home made fruit and nut coleslay and scattering of cheese (and ham for OH)


Beekissed

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2015, 01:35 »
That looks drool worthy!!!   :)

chrissie B

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2015, 09:31 »
Looks very tasty i could see a bit of bacon in mine ha ha, ive made before but mine dont puff up to much if any , recipe would be apriciated , maybe im doing somthing wronge.
chrissie b
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tosca100

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2015, 11:54 »
Looks very tasty i could see a bit of bacon in mine ha ha, ive made before but mine dont puff up to much if any , recipe would be apriciated , maybe im doing somthing wronge.
chrissie b

Chrissie, I use a very basic 500g bread recipe, no sugar or fat normally. But for these what I did different was add a good glug of olive oil to my usual, and made it quite soft. After the first prove I shaped it into eight balls but used oil on the work top rather than flour. Left them to prove again while the oven heated. I can only fit four at a time on the shelf so when the oven was ready I just rolled out four quite thin, (with a little flour this time) they only take a few minutes, the first lot I did to use, second lot undercooked to freeze. But the key is to roll and cook straight away. Rather like when you are making rolls but can't be bothered to wait long for them to rise and you get a big hole inside. Haha

beesrus

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2015, 17:33 »
While I appreciate they are not the best option in an ideal world, I use a bread maker these days. I understand the kneading thing and love rhythmic physical jobs, hence I do a lot of them, but there's only so much meditative joy I can handle :). Experience has taught me I either use a bread maker ow automatic washing machine ,or the job just doesn't happen. I do hand make special breads occasionally.
 
Surprisingly, given the love of bread making here, I see no mention at all of using fully organic flour in our breads, and wonder if it is a consideration for people where so much time and love is put in ?

Does anyone know of the horror stories, particularly with American wheat, where they soak the bulk of all wheat crops with glyphosphate just 3 or 4 days before harvesting and processing ? so as to give a few percent higher yield. The incidence graphs comparing glyphosphate use on wheat and celiac's disease over the last 30 years is alarming ... homemade bread or not. I know so many people who are careful with their fresh vegetables, but don't give their bread purity a second thought. I'm not quite sure how that has come about. I only ask because the wheat thing hadn't dawned on me until a couple of years ago, despite being an organic veg grower.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 17:47 by beesrus »

Yorkie

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2015, 18:24 »
I assume there's peer-reviewed, scientifically valid evidence to prove a causative link between glyphosate use in wheat and coeliac's disease, beesrus?  If so, please provide it.

Incidence graphs prove absolutely nothing and are nothing more than scaremongering.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 18:25 by Yorkie »
I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days all attack me at once...

Aunt Sally

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2015, 19:03 »
Your personal opinnion is not good enough, even if forcefully stated, beesrus. You should back up your claims with citations to good scientific research.
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chrissie B

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2015, 19:23 »
Thanks tosca will try that one i think maybe im not making them thin enough .
chrissie b

grendel

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2015, 19:46 »
if you want a really good flavour, try some live yeast, you can get it from most supermarkets that have a bakery, just ask at the bakery, at our local sainsburys its about 60p for 100g, we tried it once and its been live yeast for us since.
you need a little sugar to get the yeast working, you can lose some of the salt, but I would recommend only experimenting with the quantities of one item at a time, that way you know that its the change in the ingredient that is changing the result.
Grendel
we do the impossible daily, miracles take a little longer.

Aunt Sally

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2015, 19:58 »
I generally prove my doughs fairly cool and never use sugar.  The slower a dough prooves the more flavour the bread will have.

mumofstig

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #40 on: January 26, 2015, 20:23 »
I've started using a biga
http://leitesculinaria.com/79243/recipes-biga.html

It isn't as sour as sourdough, but still a lot more flavour than just using yeast. I found it whilst trialling recipes for panettone at Christmastime  ;)
Lesley
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I'm not good, I'm not bad, I'm just me - and sometimes I have to apologise for that.

beesrus

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2015, 21:17 »
My question wasn't aimed at those bread makers that are happy with glyphosphates, and I fully understand many people are, that's their choice, but more for those that might not know what goes on widely with wheat production, and may actually want to know how that herbicide is used with wheat.

While researching into some things re BQ's trials with her family's sad intolerances, I came across  interesting articles regarding assumed gluten problems that might have been useful. I didn't pass on the link for fear of what has happened to me on this thread. One article is linked below on a well read publication
http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/real-reason-for-toxic-wheat-its-not-gluten/ 

That link and long article refers to this research http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/15/4/1416   

compostqueen

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2015, 22:00 »
I buy, when I can get hold of it, organic fresh yeast, which I divvy into 10 grams, cling it and bung in the freezer

Organic flour is regularly the same price as ordinary, so I keep my eyes peeled and get it when it is. You get a better rise I think from organic flour.  Makes better sourdough too I would venture to suggest

I use a tablespoon of oil to 500 g of flour as a general rule, if I'm not using butter  :)

Beekissed

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Re: Bread the stuff of life
« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2015, 23:29 »
My question wasn't aimed at those bread makers that are happy with glyphosphates, and I fully understand many people are, that's their choice, but more for those that might not know what goes on widely with wheat production, and may actually want to know how that herbicide is used with wheat.

While researching into some things re BQ's trials with her family's sad intolerances, I came across  interesting articles regarding assumed gluten problems that might have been useful. I didn't pass on the link for fear of what has happened to me on this thread. One article is linked below on a well read publication
http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/real-reason-for-toxic-wheat-its-not-gluten/ 


That link and long article refers to this research http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/15/4/1416   

Excellent link!  Thank you!  This doesn't surprise me but it will surprise many out there claiming gluten allergies, I'm betting.  I'll be sharing it on my own forum.   :)
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 23:31 by Beekissed »

Aunt Sally

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