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Author Topic: Multi fuel Stove  (Read 4229 times)

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thestens

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Multi fuel Stove
« on: December 06, 2013, 16:59 »
Soon be moving house and the main heat source is a multi fuel stove and immersion heater for water when stove not on No gas within miles of the house. Just trying to get my head round economy seven and also scavenging for pallets etc.

Any advice
Taken over neglected veg garden at new home. Enemy number 1 Ground Elder. Then there is the furry terror - bunnies - to contend with!
Made a start have beds established but moved in too late for serious planting. We shall see what 2015 brings.


barley

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2013, 17:44 »
hi

I live in a rural property - no gas or oil

we rely totally on off peak economy 7

we use these heaters http://www.credaheating.co.uk/product_details/ch1/index.htm

they are actually industrial heaters but are quite a nice size for the rooms
they have 3 input settings to use - 1 being for spring and autumn like temperatures 2 being for chilly days and 3 for proper winter weather

they have a thermostatic control so you can boost it ,as the stored heat begins to deplete and when the heater is no longer radiating heat it has a built in fan which cuts in and blows hot air from the remaining stored heat

we find them absolutely brilliant and very efficient my model is a TSF24K Model Rating (kW) 3.4


my advice is to make sure you get a fan assisted and boost unit - there are many products on the market

sounds like you have a new adventure in your life starting  ;)
« Last Edit: December 06, 2013, 17:48 by barley »

compostqueen

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2013, 23:50 »
I've got a log burner that can burn smokeless fuel

As regards the Economy 7, keep an eye on the readings and on the bill. Apparently our Econ7 meter was not connected, although you couldn't tell that from looking at it.  We'd not noticed it, neither had the energy supplier. It was the meter man who noticed it.  We got a good rebate though  :)

arugula

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2013, 08:19 »
We renovated and live in a rural property and installed bottled gas to run the central heating we installed, heat water via a combi boiler and to power the hob. We installed an electric oven to give more than one option should there be power cuts or shortage of gas. Due to proximites we couldn't install an oil tank.

We retro-fitted a multi fuel stove where there was an open fire in the lounge. These can be obtained with a water jacket which means they'll run central heating radiators but it sounds as though yours has that if it already heats the water. Being multi fuel, you can burn wood or coal on it (smokeless if that's all your local council allows). You can buy logs - currently about 30/tonne hereabouts - or if there's a local builders merchant they always have broken pallets and may be happy to get rid of them to you. You might also find a local tree surgeon or someone else who cuts down trees who might let you have some wood. In Scotland and the same may operate elsewhere in the UK, if you live near enough to Forestry Commission forests, you can obtain a licence to collect fallen wood from the ground, but only what you can pick up and carry, no chainsaws allowed. This licence was 60 but I think may have gone up to 80/year. It's handy having a pickup. :D

We had economy 7 with storage heaters in a previous house and found it the most useless thing going as it "charged" them overnight and belted out the heat all day while we were at work!

In this property, as we did it from scratch, we've tried to cover as many bases as possible because power cuts are more frequent in rural areas - they certainly are here.

Best of luck with it! :)
"They say a snow year's a good year" -- Rutherford.

thestens

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2013, 18:10 »
Thanks for all of above it seem that unless you have storage radiators Econ 7 not worth it. So for a year or so we will run with the multifuel stove for central heating and use the immersion heater as water heat back up and summer use.  We may instal one NSH to use as frost defence when we are away for an extended period.

One of the local farmers is trying to push biomass burners so will have a chat to him. The house also has a dual radiator system that can be hooked upto either an oil boiler or air source heat pump. Both sound as though they have drawbacks and will be expensive to install. Any thoughts?

grinling

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2013, 21:58 »
we have oil and the boiler has a small water tank which it heats up, so only run the boiler in winter..have a dishwasher and showers. neighbours has a water tank which is heated once a day. neighbour also uses 2 oil filled radiators to take chill off in winter before boiler starts.
look at regs for siting an oil tank and don't padlock it.
have multifuel burner, pallets can cause tar in chimney so use a powder from the sweep. burn coal, wood and paper bricks we make with neighbours paper. fir burns well but best used as 2/3/4 year old wood as less spitty and tar.  biomass seems very good, but source the pellets first as well as grants.

Dave Ellid

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2013, 13:38 »
Hi

I am a part time landlord and have found economy-radiators.com (I have removed the www so it should not link) a great alternative to economy seven where there is no gas.

If a building has economy seven wiring even better as all you need to do is replace the socket and get the electricity co to remove the meter.

Hope this helps in some way

Goosegirl

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2014, 13:37 »
hi

I live in a rural property - no gas or oil

we rely totally on off peak economy 7

we use these heaters http://www.credaheating.co.uk/product_details/ch1/index.htm

they are actually industrial heaters but are quite a nice size for the rooms
they have 3 input settings to use - 1 being for spring and autumn like temperatures 2 being for chilly days and 3 for proper winter weather

they have a thermostatic control so you can boost it ,as the stored heat begins to deplete and when the heater is no longer radiating heat it has a built in fan which cuts in and blows hot air from the remaining stored heat

we find them absolutely brilliant and very efficient my model is a TSF24K Model Rating (kW) 3.4


my advice is to make sure you get a fan assisted and boost unit - there are many products on the market

sounds like you have a new adventure in your life starting  ;)
We also live in an isolated area with no gas or oil. Ours is an old and rather small cottage and we use an immersion heater for the water, plus an open fire that heats downstairs and airs the upstairs. Our previous open fire was exactly the same (Rayburn Rembrandt) but had a wrap-around boiler for the water and CH, but wasn't very efficient so, when the boiler burst, we replaced it but without the boiler as they had stopped making that model. Our little refurbished bathroom has underfloor heating that seems very energy-efficient. In extreme cold weather, we have an old oil-filled rad plus a convector heater and a modern paraffin heater half-way up the stairs. Looking at your Creda heating link, do these have to be on off-peak Economy 7 or similar as we are not on that tariff. I just want something to provide a low heat for the two back extension rooms.
"Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend." Martin Luther King.

MickyB

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2014, 17:44 »
Trianco TRG 45 solid fuel boiler or a TRG 60 for larger properties.
I have used a TRG 45 for over 30 years, burning anthracite coal and it does an excellent job, keeps the house very toasty in the winter - I work at a coal mine and get a free fuel allowance so I am not sure how economical it is compared with other fuels.

Ema

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2014, 11:15 »
I just wanted to add that if our going to be burning dodo like pallets that you really need to have the stove swept at least every 3 months by a Hetas approved sweep (also to check what your insurace states) and try to burn a hot coal fire once a week.

barley

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Re: Multi fuel Stove
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2014, 20:19 »
Looking at your Creda heating link, do these have to be on off-peak Economy 7 or similar as we are not on that tariff. I just want something to provide a low heat for the two back extension rooms.

yes GG the creda heater on my link is economy 7 off peak tariff - it does have an ordinary convector heater built in but I 'm sure you could find something less expensive for your needs



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